1. #1

    User Info Menu

    Hello all

    Anyway, i'm looking for a John McLaughlin song I saw online once. I remember it was just him on guitar, no accompaniment. It was lots of chords, more harmonic than a solo melody type song. Not fast at all, just lovely changes with a lot of voice leading.

    Sounded like it wasn't early in his career, played with an electric in the version I heard. And I found it through a list of songs that were considered 'standards' so i'm hoping one of you can help me find it! If anyone has an idea which one it might be please post a link and i'll see if that's the one.

    Thanks

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

    User Info Menu

    Well, this isn't it but what the hell. (and no it's not a "classical guitar concert", lol)



  4. #3

    User Info Menu

    Maybe it was this? (the first tune is Stella by Starlight, solo chord melody)


  5. #4

    User Info Menu


  6. #5

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop View Post
    Maybe this?

    Great one, how it did not flashed for me? One of my favorite, but the absolute winner is Goodbye Pork Pie Hat (does not satisfies the description of OP, anyway it worth to recall and mention it:


  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop View Post
    Maybe this?

    That's the one! Legend, thanks for posting it

  8. #7

    User Info Menu

    No problem, your description immediately suggested it to me!

  9. #8

    User Info Menu

    I've read that on that tune, he used a trick Talk Farlow did- tuning your low E string down to A (the song is in the key of A). Never worked for me, lol, I use standard tuning.

  10. #9

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by spankyf View Post
    That's the one! Legend, thanks for posting it
    Now you need to check out transcription by Francois Leduc!



    You have to tune the bottom E down to Ab. I was wondering about all of these impossible chord fingerings and then saw a comment on Leduc's video that both E&A bass strings are often fretted with the thumb.