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  1. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by setemupjoe View Post
    I teach a course in songwriting at college and the text I use is the excellent Songwriting: A Complete Guide to the Craft by Stephen Citron.
    .....
    Personally I love to hear verses as it gives added meaning to what can be some very well known choruses. My personal favorite is the collected songbook recordings of Ella Fitzgerald.
    Great post! I love Ella's songbook recordings too. She was great with Rodgers and Hart material. Here's some wicked fun with a great verse. (I think that's Herb Ellis on guitar.)


    Didn't know you taught a songwriting course. Godspeed!
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

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  3. #52

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    Great post! I love Ella's songbook recordings too. She was great with Rodgers and Hart material. Here's some wicked fun with a great verse. (I think that's Herb Ellis on guitar.)


    Didn't know you taught a songwriting course. Godspeed!
    For the last 6 years since coming off the road with Royal Crown Revue I have been teaching at Musicians Institute in Hollywood. I rewrote their Music theory curriculum and also helped rewrite their Ear Training program. Now I also teach two levels of advanced songwriting as well as do private lessons and help run the famous Schroeder’s jazz workshop (now renamed jazz improv)
    As I’ve hit my 60’s I’ve found college life is a lot more sustainable for me than touring and I get to wake up in my own bed every morning.
    Life as a musician is challenging but there’s no alternative that I would rather settle for.

  4. #53

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    By the way the Ella songbook of Rodgers and Hart is my favorite. I was very lucky to spend some time with Herb Ellis in the late 80’s. A treasured memory for me that I pass down to my students. My job is to keep these guy’s legacy alive.

  5. #54

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    Quote Originally Posted by setemupjoe View Post
    By the way the Ella songbook of Rodgers and Hart is my favorite. I was very lucky to spend some time with Herb Ellis in the late 80’s. A treasured memory for me that I pass down to my students. My job is to keep these guy’s legacy alive.
    I really like the Rodgers and Hart one too. Did she do a Johnny Mercer one? I know there's a Sinatra compilation of Mercer lyrics---great stuff. (I also prefer his version of R&H's "I Wish I Were In Love Again" to Ella's.)

    I think Ella's first songbook record was of Cole Porter tunes, right? I love her versions of "Anything Goes" and "It Was Just One Of Those Things" (-another tune with a great verse: "Romeo, why not face the facts, my dear >>>>>It was just one of those things.") Lot of gems in those records but those two are standouts for me.


    As for Herb Ellis, he's my favorite. He put a bit of blues in everything and had great time / feel. Would love to hear any stories about your time with him.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  6. #55

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    Many standards are Broadway tunes...the verse is the part usually sung with minimal accompaniment before the tune as we all know it kicks in. They kind of set up the story of the tune. An "intro" in pop/rock is a good comparison.

    A lot of times they're scrapped when playing instrumentally. Many vocalists will keep them, at least the good ones.

    Some are great, like "Stardust." Some are downright forgettable.
    What he said. Some, like Spring Can Always Hang You Up the Most or Baby, Won't You Please Come Home, and definitely Lush Life (interestingly, NOT a theater song) it would be most egregious to omit---like cutting off someone's head---except for time constraints. (A very young Barbara Streisand sang Spring Can...---and beautifully---on the Tonight Show---around '62?---for that reason)...