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  1. #1

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    Bobby Broom in this video plays so soulfully solo guitar... the tune sounds like a typical gospel/soul stuff but I still wonder what it original is...

    Thanks

    Music stats form 02:30


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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Tennessee Waltz!
    Here’s the very first recording by the co-composer Pee Wee King.

    Norah Jones did a nice version, with Adam Levy on guitar.
    Last edited by KirkP; 04-19-2019 at 03:53 AM.

  4. #3

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    Yes! Thanks!

  5. #4

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    And here's Bobby with a group...


  6. #5

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    Monster player who is well worth study!! IMHO - Will

  7. #6

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    TW is one of my favorite tunes so I'm going to post this. I find jazzing up these traditional tunes quite hard. Or rather it's not hard but what you can get away with on a jazz tune can sound very odd and maybe pretentious with this kind of thing. So one has to be careful with the subs etc.


  8. #7

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    Ella and Joe set a milestone for a jazzy "Tennessee Waltz" in 1976:





    Sonny Rollins and Jerome Harris are not bad either; here a 1992 video:





    and in a similar tradition played Benny Wallace and John Scofield in 1985:





    Yes, not easy to translate older and simpler folk tunes into something meaningful jazz.
    Maybe it would be best to just stick close to the original, like Caitlin Canty and Noam Pikelny did on Fretboard Journal last year.







    "The only two tunes that were difficult on that album ['Twilight Time", 1985] were “It’s True What They Say About Dixie” and “Tennessee Waltz,” where I really totally knew complex harmonies through those really mundane tunes." - Bennie Wallace
    Last edited by Ol' Fret; 04-24-2019 at 11:02 AM.

  9. #8

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    I must be honest, I'm not at all convinced by the Ella/Joe version. Doesn't do it for me, I'm afraid. Shame, because, well, it's them.

    Sonny sounds a bit desperate to me, like they're damn well going to do this tune no matter what!

    The Wallace and Gromit, sorry, Sco, version is probably the most acceptable. I mean they've definitely turned it into a jazz song. It verges on free playing but seems to survive :-)

  10. #9

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    But if we want to stay diatonic, but go completely potty, there's this -


  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ol' Fret View Post
    Ella and Joe set a milestone for a jazzy "Tennessee Waltz" in 1976:





    Sonny Rollins and Jerome Harris are not bad either; here a 1992 video:





    and in a similar tradition played Benny Wallace and Joe Scofield in 1985:





    Yes, not easy to translate older and simpler folk tunes into something meaningful jazz.
    Maybe it would be best to just stick close to the original, like Caitlin Canty and Noam Pikelny did on Fretboard Journal last year.






    "The only two tunes that were difficult on that album ['Twilight Time", 1985] were “It’s True What They Say About Dixie” and “Tennessee Waltz,” where I really totally knew complex harmonies through those really mundane tunes." - Bennie Wallace
    All great videos!
    Thanks for the links.
    Best
    Kris

  12. #11

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    Fortunately, jazz is such a big house! No need to be ashamed or even to apologize for something that does not necessarily correspond to the mainstream opinion.

    If I consider the melody, mood and lyrics of "Tennessee Waltz", i.e., bittersweet memories of someone's past - maybe your own, my favorite version on guitar (so far) was played by Sco who loves this song: focusing on the essentials by omitting the dispensable, a real narrative, emotionally told by a master guitarists. It seems I like the seasoned Sco much more than I did the younger one.

    That encore starts at 1:25:13


  13. #12

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    Lovely. They didn't want to stop, I know the feeling :-)

    Thanks for that.