1. #1

    User Info Menu

    So lots of folks sub the first note (D) with a G obviously because they want to play it in the low register and there is no D there (on a 6 string).

    I just cant make up my mind if I like that or not. Hence this thread here asking for opinions.

    What do you do? How do you play it?

    Thanks in advance for some input...

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

    User Info Menu

    I would leave it to the bass player
    On a marginally more serious note, I would play it an octave up, and play D. There's a lesson on this site, with suggested fingerings
    Miles Davis For Guitar | So What Tabs, Autumn Leaves Solo & 10 Licks
    If the rest of the band insisted on it being in the lower octave I would tune the E string down to D, and still play D.

  4. #3

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Average Joe
    I would play it an octave up, and play D.
    That's how I used to do it and most people do it that way.

    But...

    Grant Green on "Sunday Morning": plays it in F- and starts on a G, so changing the melody
    Jim Casey - Miles goes Wes: Bass player plays the first D note an octave higher
    Ximo Tebar - So What!: Plays a G
    Larry Carlton - Friday Nite: Omits it, just doesn't play the first note. So he can stay in the low register.
    Ronny Jordan - The Antidote: Plays G

    All other recordings I have do the standard thing D.

    Funny, isn't it?
    Last edited by DonEsteban; 04-03-2019 at 07:19 AM.

  5. #4

    User Info Menu

    Yeah, I learned it off Antido originally but these days G sound wrong to me. But it's interesting as an example in practical problem solving.

  6. #5

    User Info Menu

    Larry Carlton and Ronny Jordan play in the original key D-Dorian (C major). They both play it in a fast tempo.

    Ronny plays the first note consistently and pronounced, Larry plays it more like a ghost note.

    When played in this tempo, you could alternatively play a half muted open E as the first note, like a rhytmic thump. E is in the scale.

    When changing to Eb-dorian you could go on with the half muted open E as the first note. It then becomes a passing note to the Eb-Dorian mode. Try it. Play in a fast tempo and compare with G as the first note. Then ask a band member if they could hear a differerence and what version they prefer.

    Many scores suggests G as the starting note, but I'm not sure if Paul Chambers (Kind of Blue) plays a G...it sounds more like a rhytmic thump to my ears.

  7. #6

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by JCat
    Larry plays it more like a ghost note.
    I play it usually in that tempo and I do exactly the same, sometimes just playing another A note before the "official" one.

    Quote Originally Posted by JCat
    Many scores suggests G as the starting note, but I'm not sure if Paul Chambers (Kind of Blue) plays a G...it sounds more like a rhythmic thump to my ears.
    To my ears he definitively plays the D. It's hard to hear though because of the way the recording sounds.

    Today I listened to all variant versions I have another time and I think, I agree with Average Joe: The G sounds just not right to me, so I'll continue doing what I do all the time.


    PS.: On an off-topic side note, whenever possible I try to suggest "Impressions" when "So What" is called.
    Last edited by DonEsteban; 04-04-2019 at 05:04 AM.

  8. #7

    User Info Menu

    The "right" note is D, subbing G sounds a bit "off", ghosting, thumping, or damping the low E actually sounds OK, like "could've been D".

  9. #8

    User Info Menu

    I just play d on the sixth string and the rest of the melody on the two middle strings. Or sometimes skip the first note altogether.