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  1. #1

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    ...Adapted for a 6-string (with altered tuning, of course!).



    This is my arrangement of a technical tour-de-force, quite honestly the most challenging piece I've ever played, an intricate set of variations based on a Russian folk melody. I'd love to hear your thoughts!

    And though this is not strictly jazz, I hope this is still OK to post here. This is my last video of 2020 and I wanted to share with the community here which has been really supportive. Thank you everyone.

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  3. #2

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    Well done. Beautiful melody. I looked into the Russian 7-string guitar for a while, and was hugely impressed with the standard and amount of music that was available for it. Keep digging.

  4. #3

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    Thank you! Very enjoyable playing, sound and arrangement. The Russian folk song genre is massive. I remember my Granddad and his Russian buddies singing them well into the night)
    (Was a bit much for a 6 year old trying to sleep)))

    Ya Vastrelni Vas has been my fav.

    d

  5. #4
    Your performance captures the real spirit of a folk melody. Really beautiful and so full of soul. That kind of rubato phrasing and control over the voices is what I love hearing when a jazz performer plays a solo piece, and the reason I'm always turning to nylon string classical for inspiration.
    Very inspiring performance. Thank you!
    Do you play it on the 7 string?

  6. #5

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    yet another beauty b...a great way to end the year!...the video editing mirrored the intensity of the playing

    been great to have you aboard!


    happy new year!


    cheers

  7. #6

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    Braavo, Maestro! We're the ones who should be thanking you for your wonderful performances.

  8. #7

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    Bravo, Soul Man and Happy New Year!
    Play live . . . Marinero

  9. #8

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    Thank you!

    Funny thing is that one of the leading places for Russian 7 string guitar revival is located in the States...

    To be honest though being Russian and growing up and living in Russia I have never been a fan of Russia folklore songs... I appreciate it but just not interested that deeply... probably partly because I grew up in St.Petersburg (very European style city) and never travelled a lot around the country.
    I also do not like modern jazzified folk that becomes common here today as some kind of modern root music movement... I find it blatant and corny.


    When I was a kid there were still lots of 7 strings around.
    They were quite common in 50's -70's for accompanying songs at home, and they were almot exclusively used by so called 'bards movement' (sort of singing poets movement who mostly sang or recited their poems with a simple accompaniment of one guitar - partly underground - popular in Soviet Russia of 60s-80s, some of them were really great and exceptional ones like Vladimit Vysotsky or Alexander Galich or Bulat Okudzhava).

    I guess this tradition comes from so-called 'urban romance song' that was common in Russia (and I guess in Europe too) in late 19th and early 20th century..

    Also in Russia the Gypsy music was extremely popular and the Gypsy bands and singers were often invited to the parties and to the restraunts though it was consdered not appropriate for real nobel eintertainment being too vulgar and rackety.

    So Gypsy guitar music also influenced that style of 7 strings guitar (but not in a way Django was influenced)))

    But in 70s under influence of Western rock they were often stringed with 6 strings an dtuned like Spanish guitar.

    In the 80s 7 strings was considered a rudiment already.
    Now there seems to be new interest in it ... but it seems that these there is new interenst almost in everything.

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonah
    Thank you!

    Funny thing is that one of the leading places for Russian 7 string guitar revival is located in the States...

    To be honest though being Russian and growing up and living in Russia I have never been a fan of Russia folklore songs... I appreciate it but just not interested that deeply... probably partly because I grew up in St.Petersburg (very European style city) and never travelled a lot around the country.
    I also do not like modern jazzified folk that becomes common here today as some kind of modern root music movement... I find it blatant and corny.


    When I was a kid there were still lots of 7 strings around.
    They were quite common in 50's -70's for accompanying songs at home, and they were almot exclusively used by so called 'bards movement' (sort of singing poets movement who mostly sang or recited their poems with a simple accompaniment of one guitar - partly underground - popular in Soviet Russia of 60s-80s, some of them were really great and exceptional ones like Vladimit Vysotsky or Alexander Galich or Bulat Okudzhava).

    I guess this tradition comes from so-called 'urban romance song' that was common in Russia (and I guess in Europe too) in late 19th and early 20th century..

    Also in Russia the Gypsy music was extremely popular and the Gypsy bands and singers were often invited to the parties and to the restraunts though it was consdered not appropriate for real nobel eintertainment being too vulgar and rackety.

    So Gypsy guitar music also influenced that style of 7 strings guitar (but not in a way Django was influenced)))

    But in 70s under influence of Western rock they were often stringed with 6 strings an dtuned like Spanish guitar.

    In the 80s 7 strings was considered a rudiment already.
    Now there seems to be new interest in it ... but it seems that these there is new interenst almost in everything.


    Interesting info, J,
    And, don't forget the Brazilian 7 string guitar with its greatest proponent-- the uncomparable Yamandu Costa!
    Play live . . . Marinero



  11. #10

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    Beautiful.

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero
    Interesting info, J,
    And, don't forget the Brazilian 7 string guitar with its greatest proponent-- the uncomparable Yamandu Costa!
    Play live . . . Marinero


    Yes.. but it is totally different thing. Brazilian 7 strings is about additional bass string to Spanish tuning.

    Russian 7 stirings are open tuning which implies different conception of playing and texture, it is very similar to baroque lute open tuning too in that sense.

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonah
    Yes.. but it is totally different thing. Brazilian 7 strings is about additional bass string to Spanish tuning.

    Russian 7 stirings are open tuning which implies different conception of playing and texture, it is very similar to baroque lute open tuning too in that sense.
    Yes, J,
    That's correct however the intent of the 7 string is to broaden the tonal scope of a 6 string guitar regardless of the tuning. However, I love the sound of both and am listening to more Russian 7 string for my own education. Here's Sergei Orekov. The passion and melancholy of both Russian and Brazilian 7 string shows the deep spirit and emotion of its people and music.
    Play live . . . Marinero


  14. #13

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    Bravo!!! Any of us aspiring to play solo jazz guitar would be very well advised to listen and learn from this performance. So much here emotionally and technically to absorb.

  15. #14

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    Super! As much as dont like rubato in solo jazz gtr, in this music it is natural and organic.

    Even though I was born and lived in St Petersburg Russia for half my life, I've never seen 7 string guitar in flesh. When I was a kid I wanted to play like Visotsky, who used 7 string. I didnt even know any teachers who would teach it, and I dont remember it was taught in any music schools. I guess yea, like Jonah said, the Western influence was too strong and everyone wanted 6 string.

    Anyway, I love hearing Russian songs played with such passion and skill. Also hear jazz tunes on trad Russian instruments, it's also a thing.

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hep To The Jive
    Super! As much as dont like rubato in solo jazz gtr, in this music it is natural and organic.

    Even though I was born and lived in St Petersburg Russia for half my life, I've never seen 7 string guitar in flesh. When I was a kid I wanted to play like Visotsky, who used 7 string. I didnt even know any teachers who would teach it, and I dont remember it was taught in any music schools. I guess yea, like Jonah said, the Western influence was too strong and everyone wanted 6 string.

    Anyway, I love hearing Russian songs played with such passion and skill. Also hear jazz tunes on trad Russian instruments, it's also a thing.
    Hi, Hep,
    Do you think it might be generational to your age group? Would your parents have had a different experience?
    Play live . . . Marinero

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero
    Hi, Hep,
    Do you think it might be generational to your age group? Would your parents have had a different experience?
    Play live . . . Marinero
    I guess ma and Hep, we are approximaely the same generation.


    I began to play guitar when I suddenly found two Beatles LPs in mys stepfather collection. Those were the only Beatles LPs issues in USSR.

    My parantes got me a guitar... the thibg is that in USSR it was a problem to get a decent guitar (6 or 7 strings - no matter)....
    Soviet 6 strings were weird beasts -- some kind of mix of Spanish guitar and 7 string in costruction (bolted neck)... designe for steel string they might have classical bridge etc.
    Heavy, with thick necks, mostly plywood (except top ones)... we called them 'logs'

    Now imagine.. after1 year of playing my parents noticed that I began to play from the scores myself - they asked if wanted to go for classical guitar...

    And I went to study classical wit hthe same guitar and played all the stuff on it - just with nylon strings... even German or Czech guitars were difficult to find and expensive.

    It is really difficult to describe what range of instruments was available in Soviet Russia was days.
    In a word: no range available... )))