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  1. #1

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    Enjoying my most recent acquisition ...

    DB


  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    What a totally overhwhelmingly wonderful tone! Clean but thick. Beautifully played.

    And I even remember this, as a veteran of rmmgj from 15-20 years ago.


  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone
    What a totally overhwhelmingly wonderful tone! Clean but thick. Beautifully played.

    And I even remember this, as a veteran of rmmgj from 15-20 years ago.

    Thanks Lawson. So you remember that classic thread at RMMGJ! Yes you were there, I remember that. It was way before the days of JGBE ... Many of the posts here are Deja Vu for me because we discussed many of the same things 20 years ago ... Many posted clips too at the time. It was a very lively community with a.o. Joey Goldstein, Kevin van Sant, Joe Finn, Jack Zucker, Mark Kleinhaut, Joe Ragusa, Dan Adler, Ralph Patt, Tom Lippincott, Steve Herberman, Holger Weber, Clay Moore, Bob Russell, Cliff Kuplen, Jimmy Bruno, Jon Fox, Rick del Savio, Tim Berens etc. etc. Unfortunately that forum was destroyed by the trolls. What remains is an empty shell of its former self.

    I stll have that 175 that I am playing on the old RMMGJ clip you just posted.

    DB

  5. #4

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    We’re enjoying it too! Beautiful guitar, beautiful tone, beautiful ideas and playing. Thanks!

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by DB's Jazz Guitar Blog
    Thanks Lawson. So you remember that classic thread at RMMGJ! Yes you were there, I remember that. It was way before the days of JGBE ... Many of the posts here are Deja Vu for me because we discussed many of the same things 20 years ago ... Many posted clips too at the time. It was a very lively community with a.o. Joey Goldstein, Kevin van Sant, Joe Finn, Jack Zucker, Mark Kleinhaut, Joe Ragusa, Dan Adler, Ralph Patt, Tom Lippincott, Steve Herberman, Holger Weber, Clay Moore, Bob Russell, Cliff Kuplen, Jimmy Bruno, Jon Fox, Rick del Savio, Tim Berens etc. etc. Unfortunately that forum was destroyed by the trolls. What remains is an empty shell of its former self.

    I stll have that 175 that I am playing on the old RMMGJ clip you just posted.

    DB
    That's a real roll call of the online heroes of Jazz Guitar! I first got on rmmgj when my dad had a heart-attack and stroke and I went to his home for about 3 weeks, and every night via dial-up internet read that newsgroup and got my daily "fix" of jazz guitar. That was quite a time!

  7. #6

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    those were the days. man, i miss cliff cuplen. goldstein is still batteling it out at rmmgj, i read dan's name at martino's gofundme page. clay seems to hang out here from time to time, havent heard from ragusa in ages, hope he is well.

  8. #7

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    One of my favorite tunes, made my day;
    Sounds great, I like the way you play!

  9. #8

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    Great playing DB! I enjoyed that. Some very nice, clear improv ideas on a great ol' tune. The earlier version is great too but if I may, I'd like to say that I appreciate the space and phrasing of the more mature player.

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by ccroft
    Great playing DB! I enjoyed that. Some very nice, clear improv ideas on a great ol' tune. The earlier version is great too but if I may, I'd like to say that I appreciate the space and phrasing of the more mature player.
    Thanks. Yeah, you are right there Croft. It took my quite a while to get more space into my playing. At the time I thought it was vital to play as many notes as I could. Speed never was a big deal for me so I overplayed all the time.

    DB

  11. #10

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    It's one of my biggest beefs with a lot of guitarists. We don't get to stop and take a breath, and sometimes I feel like I'm listening to a dog chasing it's tail around in little circles. I'll admit to falling into the same trap back in early fusion years.

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by djg
    those were the days. man, i miss cliff cuplen. goldstein is still batteling it out at rmmgj, i read dan's name at martino's gofundme page. clay seems to hang out here from time to time, havent heard from ragusa in ages, hope he is well.
    Joe Ragusa (PMfan) is a FB friend and still sends me videos of funny cats and dogs regularly and we have the occasional chat. Cliff Kuplen and Ralph Patt have died. Joey Goldstein is an active member of Jack Zucker's FB page "Modern Jazz Guitar." Pat Smith and Joe Finn have their own FB groups I think.

    A few old RMMGJ members follow my Blog FB page or my are FB friends (Bob Russell, Joe Finn, Dan Adler, Jack Zucker, Charlie Robinson, Rick del Savio, Kevin van Sant, Max Leggett, Joe Finn, Skip Moy, Lawson Stone).

    Some of them are right here (PMB, Paul Sanwald, Holger Weber, Lawson Stone).

    Sorry if I forgot someone.

    I learned a lot from that group. I was a jazz guitar rookie in those days. The core of that group was as close as virtual closeness can be. Some of the guys actually met in the real world.

    O yeah, Richard Bornman, remember him haha! Good player though.

    DB

  13. #12

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    That's wonderful - great sense of time and space and that ES 350 sounds wonderful plus "Just Friends" is a fave of mine.

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by DB's Jazz Guitar Blog
    Joe Ragusa (PMfan) is a FB friend and still sends me videos of funny cats and dogs regularly and we have the occasional chat. Cliff Kuplen and Ralph Patt have died. Joey Goldstein is an active member of Jack Zucker's FB page "Modern Jazz Guitar." Pat Smith and Joe Finn have their own FB groups I think.

    A few old RMMGJ members follow my Blog FB page or my are FB friends (Bob Russell, Joe Finn, Dan Adler, Jack Zucker, Charlie Robinson, Rick del Savio, Kevin van Sant, Max Leggett, Joe Finn, Skip Moy, Lawson Stone).

    Some of them are right here (PMB, Paul Sanwald, Holger Weber, Lawson Stone).

    Sorry if I forgot someone.

    I learned a lot from that group. I was a jazz guitar rookie in those days. The core of that group was as close as virtual closeness can be. Some of the guys actually met in the real world.

    O yeah, Richard Bornman, remember him haha! Good player though.

    DB
    Close indeed. That group got me through the death of my (beloved) step-mother, my dad, and my brother, all over a fairly short interval. I had a lot of lonely nights working on estate and medical business, with no entertainment but the guitar. The rmmgj newsgroup was a lifeline and many on that group kept me encouraged and functioning in a very hard period of my life.

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by DB's Jazz Guitar Blog
    Joe Ragusa (PMfan) is a FB friend and still sends me videos of funny cats and dogs regularly and we have the occasional chat. Cliff Kuplen and Ralph Patt have died. Joey Goldstein is an active member of Jack Zucker's FB page "Modern Jazz Guitar." Pat Smith and Joe Finn have their own FB groups I think.

    A few old RMMGJ members follow my Blog FB page or my are FB friends (Bob Russell, Joe Finn, Dan Adler, Jack Zucker, Charlie Robinson, Rick del Savio, Kevin van Sant, Max Leggett, Joe Finn, Skip Moy, Lawson Stone).

    Some of them are right here (PMB, Paul Sanwald, Holger Weber, Lawson Stone).

    Sorry if I forgot someone.

    I learned a lot from that group. I was a jazz guitar rookie in those days. The core of that group was as close as virtual closeness can be. Some of the guys actually met in the real world.

    O yeah, Richard Bornman, remember him haha! Good player though.

    DB
    that's good to hear. pkirk also hangs out here and did visit us a few years ago.

    i always thought you set a gold standard of what dedicated "amateurs" can acheive if they don't miss the forrest for the trees. the DB method.

  16. #15

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    I used to follow RMMGJ, probably didn’t post that often as everyone seemed to know more about it all than I did!

    In those days I was just known as Graham, it was before I had the Boperation (a very painful procedure).

  17. #16

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    What a great thread. Great music and a cautionary tale about trying to preserve a good thing. There is always someone or something out there, whether on purpose or not, trying to change or destroy it - or both.

    Those trolls should have just left you guys alone. But no, they just had to spread their misery to your little slice of paradise.

    Sorry to sound a little bitter, but I have heard this type of story a bit too many times in my life.

    At least this site does a pretty good job of keeping out folks who come in and muck things up.

  18. #17

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    I dunno, yeah there were more notes in the earlier clip but he did rest here and there, I liked 'em both

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by djg
    i always thought you set a gold standard of what dedicated "amateurs" can acheive if they don't miss the forrest for the trees. the DB method.
    Thanks Holger. I have always thought the best way too study jazz is reproducing the sounds. Playing transcribed solos and licks. Building up muscle memory. I never indulged in theory discussions, not in my RMMGJ time and not now in this place. I disabled the theory forum even here. I believe playing jazz guitar is behavior, not necessarily knowledge. It may coincide or may not.

    By the way, most people here probably do not know what a fine player you (djg) are. Listen to this dudes:



    Do you have full clips somewhere?

    DB

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlsoRan
    What a great thread. Great music and a cautionary tale about trying to preserve a good thing. There is always someone or something out there, whether on purpose or not, trying to change or destroy it - or both. Those trolls should have just left you guys alone. But no, they just had to spread their misery to your little slice of paradise. Sorry to sound a little bitter, but I have heard this type of story a bit too many times in my life. At least this site does a pretty good job of keeping out folks who come in and muck things up.
    Yes, it was a good place for years. And it still exits. But it was unmoderated and it was literally destroyed by a few trolls. Many left and now it is dwindling.

    I must have left over 10 years ago.

    DB

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by DB's Jazz Guitar Blog
    Joe Ragusa (PMfan) is a FB friend and still sends me videos of funny cats and dogs regularly and we have the occasional chat. Cliff Kuplen and Ralph Patt have died. Joey Goldstein is an active member of Jack Zucker's FB page "Modern Jazz Guitar." Pat Smith and Joe Finn have their own FB groups I think.

    A few old RMMGJ members follow my Blog FB page or my are FB friends (Bob Russell, Joe Finn, Dan Adler, Jack Zucker, Charlie Robinson, Rick del Savio, Kevin van Sant, Max Leggett, Joe Finn, Skip Moy, Lawson Stone).

    Some of them are right here (PMB, Paul Sanwald, Holger Weber, Lawson Stone).

    Sorry if I forgot someone.

    I learned a lot from that group. I was a jazz guitar rookie in those days. The core of that group was as close as virtual closeness can be. Some of the guys actually met in the real world.

    O yeah, Richard Bornman, remember him haha! Good player though.

    DB
    Sounding great, DB! I caught up with Dan Adler and Paul Sanwald late last year in NY for a lovely Sunday afternoon jam. As for Richard Bornman, we perform together every weekend here in Sydney (or did until the virus closed off our gig). He's still as mischievous as ever and playing up a storm.

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by DB's Jazz Guitar Blog
    Thanks Holger. I have always thought the best way too study jazz is reproducing the sounds. Playing transcribed solos and licks. Building up muscle memory. I never indulged in theory discussions, not in my RMMGJ time and not now in this place. I disabled the theory forum even here. I believe playing jazz guitar is behavior, not necessarily knowledge. It may coincide or may not.

    By the way, most people here probably do not know what a fine player you (djg) are. Listen to this dudes:

    Do you have full clips somewhere?

    DB
    you're too kind. that CD was recorded during rather tough times. i had lost function in my right eye a few months earlier and wasn't in any shape. here's something from a live gig a few months later. a little wes tribute. nothing to write home about. will put it down in a few days.


  23. #22

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    I still have some old RMMGJ posts on an old computer. Some of the repeat offenders were;

    Tom Lippincott
    Bob Agnew
    Elliott Randall
    Margaret Wilson
    Dom Minasi
    Tom Walls
    Stan Fong
    Jay Carlson
    Mike Cea
    Glenn Murch
    icarusi
    David Moss
    Tim Berens
    Mark Sabatella
    Pt
    Mark Guest
    Mark Smart
    Kurt Shapiro
    Clay Moore
    David Littleboy
    Tom Brown
    Gerry Scott-Moore
    Keith Freeman
    Harry Avant
    Greg D oasysco
    Victor Magnani
    Nice Dan from UK
    Joe Giglio
    Nate Najar
    James Seaberry
    Lord Valve
    Doug Wamble
    Tim McNamara
    Ted Vieira
    Willie K Yee
    Jeremy Poparad
    Jay Wolfe
    Chip Zempel
    Michael L Kankiewic
    Wesley Dick
    Jim Kangas
    Joe Vinikow
    Rick Ross
    David C Stephens
    Paul Kirk
    JimboL5
    Jim Kroger
    Bob Patterson
    Chris Buzzelli

  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by djg
    you're too kind. that CD was recorded during rather tough times. i had lost function in my right eye a few months earlier and wasn't in any shape. here's something from a live gig a few months later. a little wes tribute. nothing to write home about. will put it down in a few days.

    Excellent playing Holger!

    DB

  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by PMB
    Sounding great, DB! I caught up with Dan Adler and Paul Sanwald late last year in NY for a lovely Sunday afternoon jam. As for Richard Bornman, we perform together every weekend here in Sydney (or did until the virus closed off our gig). He's still as mischievous as ever and playing up a storm.
    That's cool PMB. Wasn't Richard here for a while? Probably did not last long!

    RMMGJ created some life long friendships. Virtual or real.

    DB

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by djg
    that's good to hear. pkirk also hangs out here and did visit us a few years ago.

    i always thought you set a gold standard of what dedicated "amateurs" can acheive if they don't miss the forrest for the trees. the DB method.
    By the way Holger, there is still a review and photo page of our gig at the Crow with Anton Goudsmit way back in 2004:

    Draai om je oren - Jazz & meer - Weblog

    DB

  27. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by DB's Jazz Guitar Blog
    Thanks Holger. I have always thought the best way too study jazz is reproducing the sounds. Playing transcribed solos and licks. Building up muscle memory. I never indulged in theory discussions, not in my RMMGJ time and not now in this place. I disabled the theory forum even here. I believe playing jazz guitar is behavior, not necessarily knowledge. It may coincide or may not.

    By the way, most people here probably do not know what a fine player you (djg) are. Listen to this dudes:



    Do you have full clips somewhere?

    DB
    You just stated the huge change in my approach in the last 3-4 years


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  28. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by DB's Jazz Guitar Blog
    By the way Holger, there is still a review and photo page of our gig at the Crow with Anton Goudsmit way back in 2004:

    Draai om je oren - Jazz & meer - Weblog

    DB
    Makes for a fun read in ‘microsoft-english’! Some cool photos too.

    Just Friends on my 1952 Gibson ES-350-b7356c7e-2980-46ff-bb78-1cf6ef3a8d46-jpgJust Friends on my 1952 Gibson ES-350-6748a699-38bb-4f76-ad2b-1094ad484611-jpgJust Friends on my 1952 Gibson ES-350-7cfc16c4-f818-4bae-a23f-6dfa6b574001-jpeg

  29. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop
    Makes for a fun read in ‘microsoft-english’! Some cool photos too.
    Thanks for translating Graham!

    DB

  30. #29

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    No problem! My favourite bit is ‘regularly poked the fire with his sticks’!

  31. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone
    You just stated the huge change in my approach in the last 3-4 years Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    I am not totally against the chord/scale theory thing. Some may benefit but on the whole it is very much an academic (teaching) thing. Contrary to what many people think I do have a basic knowledge of scales and know how to use them over chords (the modes, melodic minor, lydian dominant, diminished, altered etc. etc.) and I could even tell you where I use what in one of my solos. My first (and only) teacher taught me that. However, I hardly think that way anymore because music is not much of a cognitive thing once you are out there. It is behaviour based on sounds that you have internalised somehow. Therefore I have found it much more useful to study those sounds in action, especially in licks and transcribed solos. I believe it is even perfectly possible to forego the whole theory thing simply by imitating what you hear. It is perfectly possible too to learn a language without knowing any grammar right? You have to develop a good ear for sounds.

    Nobody plays scales. They are not musical. But licks are. Focus on sounds and play, play, play. Learn a lot of licks, internalise them and change them into your own lines so that you develop your own voice. If you want to label them within the chord, scale theory thing, be my guest.

    Though I hardly ever give advice, I did write a Blog about my approach. It is not mine by the way. The aural tradition was the way all our heroes learned to play jazz before the 70s.

    Dutchbopper's Jazz Guitar Blog: Why You Should Study That Lick

    DB

  32. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by DB's Jazz Guitar Blog
    That's cool PMB. Wasn't Richard here for a while? Probably did not last long!

    RMMGJ created some life long friendships. Virtual or real.

    DB
    to be fair, rmmgj was a sharktank with people constantly at each others throat. fun times.

    paul pls say hi to RB. he may think i hate him but the opposite is true.

  33. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by djg
    to be fair, rmmgj was a sharktank with people constantly at each others throat. fun times.
    O yeah, it was umoderated so clashes would occur regularly and obviously people did not get on well with everybody. Same here. But nothing like what happened when the real trolls entered. This was after I had left but when I occasionally lurked a few years later I was amazed at the vitriol and the flaming. Did you ever witness those? Oh man ...

    DB

  34. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by DB's Jazz Guitar Blog
    I am not totally against the chord/scale theory thing. Some may benefit but on the whole it is very much an academic (teaching) thing. Contrary to what many people think I do have a basic knowledge of scales and know how to use them over chords (the modes, melodic minor, lydian dominant, diminished, altered etc. etc.) and I could even tell you where I use what in one of my solos. My first (and only) teacher taught me that. However, I hardly think that way anymore because music is not much of a cognitive thing once you are out there. It is behaviour based on sounds that you have internalised somehow. Therefore I have found it much more useful to study those sounds in action, especially in licks and transcribed solos. I believe it is even perfectly possible to forego the whole theory thing simply by imitating what you hear. It is perfectly possible too to learn a language without knowing any grammar right? You have to develop a good ear for sounds.

    Nobody plays scales. They are not musical. But licks are. Focus on sounds and play, play, play. Learn a lot of licks, internalise them and change them into your own lines so that you develop your own voice. If you want to label them within the chord, scale theory thing, be my guest.

    Though I hardly ever give advice, I did write a Blog about my approach. It is not mine by the way. The aural tradition was the way all our heroes learned to play jazz before the 70s.

    Dutchbopper's Jazz Guitar Blog: Why You Should Study That Lick

    DB
    This really resonates for me. I started jazz 30 years ago with chord-scale thinking, and learned a lot, but just didn't feel like I was playing what I wanted to play. I transcribed a few solos, and remember thinking that I learned more from that than from the chord-scale books, though I guess those books taught me something about what I would "see" in my transcribing.

    Then I started in on the Jimmy Raney solos in the Aebersold set and I feel like I'm getting the ear-fingerboard-hands links in place for the first time. I don't post much of my own improvisation, but I am seeing progress in my practice of improvisation and feeling a lot of hope to suck way less than I used to. Something about playing excellent music, hearing that stuff coming out of my own amp, created by my own hands, has taught me more than half-a$$ed scale runs and arpeggios ever did, though I am totally in agreement that we need to know the fingerboard up and down, and the positions for scales and arpeggios are vital for that. Still, for getting the feel and tone down in the basement of our playing, nothing has helped me more than playing stuff created by masters and then branching out from that.

  35. #34

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    Agree. The earlier clip fits the “burning” profile - chops, speed, creativity. Loved it. Both were great!

    AKA

    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon
    I dunno, yeah there were more notes in the earlier clip but he did rest here and there, I liked 'em both

  36. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone
    This really resonates for me. I started jazz 30 years ago with chord-scale thinking, and learned a lot, but just didn't feel like I was playing what I wanted to play. I transcribed a few solos, and remember thinking that I learned more from that than from the chord-scale books, though I guess those books taught me something about what I would "see" in my transcribing.

    Then I started in on the Jimmy Raney solos in the Aebersold set and I feel like I'm getting the ear-fingerboard-hands links in place for the first time. I don't post much of my own improvisation, but I am seeing progress in my practice of improvisation and feeling a lot of hope to suck way less than I used to. Something about playing excellent music, hearing that stuff coming out of my own amp, created by my own hands, has taught me more than half-a$$ed scale runs and arpeggios ever did, though I am totally in agreement that we need to know the fingerboard up and down, and the positions for scales and arpeggios are vital for that. Still, for getting the feel and tone down in the basement of our playing, nothing has helped me more than playing stuff created by masters and then branching out from that.
    Good for you. On the web you see all kinds of nonsense advocated such as play all scales and arps in all keys in all positions etc. I am utterly and totally convinced the guys you and I love so much never did that.

    Your Raney and Donna Lee stuff is the way to go.

    I'd strongly recommend Joe Pass' books, I got more out of his stuff than for instance the Bird solos that I studied because Joe thinks like a guitarist and Bird does not. Joe's melodic concept is so logical. If you don't read music well, get "On Guitar." He even explains what he is playing. Darn, that's the second advice today and I hate giving unwanted advice. After you studied that book the melodic minors and altered licks creep in and you sound better right away. Very often that is what I miss in student level playing. There's too little "real" jazz content and it's all very diatonic. Even over a static major chord can throw in altered stuff ...

    The etude below was an eye opener for me in the early 2000s.

    DB


  37. #36

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    Nice. I have all his books. I need to go back and play those exercises.

  38. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone
    Nice. I have all his books. I need to go back and play those exercises.
    My vid is one of the longer etudes. But the good thing about the book is that there are so many short phrases (he calls them "examples") of 2, 3 or 4 bars that you can learn and then apply right away into your own playing.

    DB