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  1. #1

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    This one is short and sweet. It's not on any CD. I passed on it for Melody Messenger, but NY chanteuse and radio host Mary Foster Conklin requested a track by a female composer (Irene Kitchings, in this case) to play on her WFDU FM radio show: Women in Jazz.

    I like to call this approach to tempo when I got into it 'back porch swing'...



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  3. #2

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    Hi, Joel. Nice playing. However, the composition didn't do anything for me. It just seemed to wander. I think your "back porch style" description was correct. I don't recall you mentioning ,in previous posts, what guitar you play, strings and amp. I didn't hear any reverb. Your sound is very clean. Are you willing to share your secret potion? Good playing . . . Marinero

  4. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero
    Hi, Joel. Nice playing. However, the composition didn't do anything for me. It just seemed to wander. I think your "back porch style" description was correct. I don't recall you mentioning ,in previous posts, what guitar you play, strings and amp. I didn't hear any reverb. Your sound is very clean. Are you willing to share your secret potion? Good playing . . . Marinero
    OK, you're entitled. I like the tune---1st heard Billie sing it on a collection. Tommy Flanagan did it to a T, instrumentally.

    I play a Godin 5th Ave. Kingpin with 13s. The amp is a Fender, I forget which, but a small tube one at Bobby Lenti's home studio. There is reverb, added from the board, just not that much...
    Last edited by joelf; 02-25-2020 at 06:19 PM.

  5. #4

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    Kitchings wrote some cool tunes including Some other spring, I'm pulling through, Ghost of yesterday.
    Her style is little different but that's what makes her interesting to me.
    She's largely forgotten today, but as long as those Holiday performances get played her small contribution to the music will endure.
    If you're not familiar w them listen to the vocal performances first.

  6. #5
    It was practically impossible for a woman to be anything but a singer in jazz---especially a black woman---going back many decades. These talented women were real heroines who really caught hell. I was reading about Valaida Snow---they reprinted her obit in yesterday's NY Times. She did pretty well for a time from the '30s until WWII, but she was the exception. Remember Billie Tipton? A woman masquerading as a man just to be able to work. That's the way it was. Kitchings and Irene Higginbotham (Good Morning Heartache) wrote as well as any man. The world wasn't ready in their time, but those songs will be with us for many more years...

  7. #6

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    like the idea behind it-the tribute, like the playing and the tune

    sound is a bit dry to my ear as well...next time use a larger verb setting and a little more of it..warms things up a bit...a little room ambience helps..

    still like it tho..well done

    cheers

  8. #7

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    Yes, also wondering what the ticking static sound is on a lot of your recordings.

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon
    Yes, also wondering what the ticking static sound is on a lot of your recordings.
    Not 100% sure, but of course I heard it too. We (Bobby mostly, at my urging) cleaned a lot of that up by darkening the sound. On this track (not on the released recording anyway) we focused more on editing than cleaning those things up b/c I goofed the melody on the bridge when we 1st recorded it, and a segue from the verse to Spring Can Really...didn't quite come off, so I substituted that little intro. Maybe the static is the different setting, different day?

    All I can tell you is we broke our asses making, editing, and adding to that recording---in a home studio set up---and it's done. I think he did a great job, especially in view of my fussiness and ups and downs mood-wise. I'll live with the remaining flaws. I used my ears when I could afterward, and Bobby is the tech guy, also with sharp ears and input (he's a hell of a rock and blues player and writer). Time to move on to something else...
    Last edited by joelf; 02-25-2020 at 07:18 PM.

  10. #9

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    Thanks for posting a great recording, Joel, and reminding us of those women in jazz who have gone missing.

    Hazel Scott started out as a pianist and trumpeter and was admitted to Juilliard at the age of 8. She later had a career mostly as a singer (and had some movie roles), but was blacklisted as a communist sympathizer, which of course she wasn't; she was also very involved in civil rights, with her husband Adam Clayton Powell. As a result, like many other African-American jazz musicians, she moved to Paris.

    Hazel Scott is credited as the first African-American woman with her own TV show, in 1950, but Una Mae Carlisle had her own short-lived TV show in the late '40's. She was an extremely talented pianist, composer, and singer who was discovered by Fats Waller in the '30's when she was still a teenager. She had a coast-to-coast radio show on ABC every Saturday night in 1950. Her popularity was huge. And now? Hardly remembered, if remembered at all.

  11. #10
    The saddest story I've heard is about what Leonard Feather did to the career of the very talented pianist-organist Jutta Hipp: He was her enthusiastic cheerleader at first, helping her come to the states and writing rave reviews of her recordings. Then he, a married man, hit on her. When she declined his advances he trashed her next recording. She left the music business shortly after this, and lived and died in obscurity in Queens, NY---where she worked as a seamstress...

  12. #11
    I thought Valaida Snow was the first woman of color to have her own TV show? At least according to that obit...

  13. #12

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    and lets not forget beloved mary lou williams!!

    harlem jazz 58 photo w monk to her left



    cheers

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    The saddest story I've heard is about what Leonard Feather did to the career of the very talented pianist-organist Jutta Hipp: He was her enthusiastic cheerleader at first, helping her come to the states and writing rave reviews of her recordings. Then he, a married man, hit on her. When she declined his advances he trashed her next recording. She left the music business shortly after this, and lived and died in obscurity in Queens, NY---where she worked as a seamstress...
    Most who were close to her don't feel Feather killed her career. He actually was responsible for her having one in music, brought her to the US, got her gigs and set up the record sessions.
    Gigs were slowly drying up and apparently she really didn't want to be in bands and gave it up for steady work on the advice of her accountant. She also had personal problems, severe stage fright medicated w alcohol etc
    But there is a story of Art Blakey forcing her to sit in w the Messengers when she was drunk and then blowing her off the bandstand and announcing to the crowd "that's why we don't want European musicians taking our jobs"

    I love Art, but shame on him...

  15. #14

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  16. #15
    I don't trust anything Marc Meyers prints. Maybe I didn't get the story 100% right, but Feather still comes off a predatory creep. He also tried to write Monk out of modern jazz history. Ugh...

  17. #16

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    Well, he may have printed it but he didn't write it. Sounds like the most informed piece on her I've ever read. draw your own conclusions...and it sounds like you did.

  18. #17
    I was misinformed. Thanks for the heads up. But feelings are feelings...

  19. #18
    I think this track will be played sometime today, Sunday, March 1 (3-7 PM EST) on Mary's show (or next week?) on WFDU FM. Go here and select HD2 WFDU Player

    If she doesn't play it, it's an excellent listen anyway. She knows her stuff, is an accomplished singer herself, and the show features women in jazz...

  20. #19
    Alas, not today. But Mary's a woman of her word---and I really dig her as a broadcaster. Been listening on and off for awhile, on FDU and WBAI. Good show today...

  21. #20

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    I really like this. Thanks for sharing.

  22. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by L50EF15
    I really like this. Thanks for sharing.
    Thanks. So easy with a great tune...