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  1. #1
    destinytot Guest

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    amazing player with outerwordly good technique. Very impressive indeed.

  4. #3

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    There is a long thread about him and his brother on another sites heres some of the other videos from that thread.

    As a kid with his brother


    Good close up of his hand work



    The brothers together later in New York



    More solo PG



    PG with his new guitar




    There is quite a bit of PG and his brother is you search around.
    No, I'm not going to give you the answer to your question. I don't want to deny you the pleasure you'll receive when you figure it out yourself. -- Bill Evans talking to his brother.

  5. #4

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    I see from Facebook that Pasquale Grasso has a solo guitar recording, 'Reflections of Me', coming out this week.

    London Jazz Guitar Society:
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  6. #5

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    I've watched in fascination at this guys mind boggling technique. It's clear he knows the Bebop vocabulary backwards too.

    Another clip, so you can marvel at the combination of a vintage Gibson ES-150 and Samick practice amp.


  7. #6

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    I bought his album couple days ago. He is a great player. Amazing technique. I didn't like his tone (his tone control must be at 0).

  8. #7
    destinytot Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by pubylakeg View Post
    I've watched in fascination at this guys mind boggling technique. It's clear he knows the Bebop vocabulary backwards too.

    Another clip, so you can marvel at the combination of a vintage Gibson ES-150 and Samick practice amp.

    Bebop. Forever.

  9. #8
    very impressive technique
    HB
    Last edited by Hyppolyte Bergamotte; 01-11-2016 at 03:58 AM.

  10. #9

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    I've just recently discovered this guy and am obsessed with his approach....Does anybody have any insight into his technique or approach?

    So far I've discovered:

    + He uses a lot of the Barry Harris method for comping

    + He uses "Chuck Wayne Picking" (What is this apart from sweeping or economy picking?)

    + He studied with one of Chuck Wayne's disciples

    + He studied classical guitar

    I'm just floored by how articulate and smooth everything is. His playing is like a Saxophone and Piano combined. I'm just wondering if at this point in my development it would even be worth it to work towards playing and learning his sort of concepts. It might sort of be like reinventing the wheel.

    I guess I'd have to worry about finding somebody that could show me the Chuck Wayne approach to things first..certainly nobody around my parts plays like this.

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by JazzMuzak View Post
    I've just recently discovered this guy and am obsessed with his approach....Does anybody have any insight into his technique or approach?

    So far I've discovered:

    + He uses a lot of the Barry Harris method for comping

    + He uses "Chuck Wayne Picking" (What is this apart from sweeping or economy picking?)

    + He studied with one of Chuck Wayne's disciples

    + He studied classical guitar

    I'm just floored by how articulate and smooth everything is. His playing is like a Saxophone and Piano combined. I'm just wondering if at this point in my development it would even be worth it to work towards playing and learning his sort of concepts. It might sort of be like reinventing the wheel.

    I guess I'd have to worry about finding somebody that could show me the Chuck Wayne approach to things first..certainly nobody around my parts plays like this.
    Having a brother who plays Jazz saxophone helps with phrasing like a sax.

    Here's another great Jack Wilkins talking about Chuck Wayne.....

    Jack Wilkins


    Chuck’s mastery of the instrument was legendary. Every facet of guitar playing he had thought out and put to the best possible use. The picking technique he used, called “alternate consecutive,” enabled him to play arpeggios and scales with the least amount of motion and with maximum relaxation. When I first saw Chuck play, his pick hand reminded me of a spider crawling up and down from one string to another and back again! It was beautiful to watch. His fret hand stayed so close to the fingerboard that you almost thought he wasn’t playing at all. That’s how easy it looked. When I transcribed some of his solos, I realized how difficult it was to play them. Till this day I can’t believe he was able to play like that.
    No, I'm not going to give you the answer to your question. I don't want to deny you the pleasure you'll receive when you figure it out yourself. -- Bill Evans talking to his brother.

  12. #11

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    Astoundingly good player. To watch him is to marvel.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  13. #12

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    Chuck Wayne...

    I have four albums of his now, he's got an interesting vibe and great lines:



    Listen to that subtle chime... reminds me of Johnny Smith (JS is more chimey, Chuck is darker)



    And at 70


  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by docbop View Post
    Having a brother who plays Jazz saxophone helps with phrasing like a sax.

    Here's another great Jack Wilkins talking about Chuck Wayne.....

    Jack Wilkins


    Chuck’s mastery of the instrument was legendary. Every facet of guitar playing he had thought out and put to the best possible use. The picking technique he used, called “alternate consecutive,” enabled him to play arpeggios and scales with the least amount of motion and with maximum relaxation. When I first saw Chuck play, his pick hand reminded me of a spider crawling up and down from one string to another and back again! It was beautiful to watch. His fret hand stayed so close to the fingerboard that you almost thought he wasn’t playing at all. That’s how easy it looked. When I transcribed some of his solos, I realized how difficult it was to play them. Till this day I can’t believe he was able to play like that.
    Thanks for hipping me to that CD!

    Quote Originally Posted by Irez87 View Post
    Chuck Wayne...

    I have four albums of his now, he's got an interesting vibe and great lines:



    Listen to that subtle chime... reminds me of Johnny Smith (JS is more chimey, Chuck is darker)



    And at 70

    Thanks for these! Is the title of the record "tasty pudding"? I couldn't find that anywhere with a quick internet search. Are there any other "definitive" recordings?

  15. #14

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    Didn't Chuck write Solar into the deal?

    Pasquale is a frightening individual on guitar...

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Didn't Chuck write Solar into the deal?
    So the story goes

    "Tasty Pudding" can be found on the "Jazz Guitar Classics" album under Chuck's name. I think it's a compilation, but it sounds like a complete album to me.

  17. #16

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    The "Solar" story: Chuck wrote a tune called "Sonny" for his Woody Herman colleague, trumpeter Sonny Berman. They recorded it onto an acetate in Oklahoma in 1946 while touring. Miles was a friend of Sonny's. He heard the tune soon after and recorded it as "Solar" (the name gives away the source). The first Chuck heard about Miles' recording was when he came across Eddie Costa playing a version at a NY bar. Chuck was understandably shocked and asked Eddie how he learned the tune. Eddie replied, "It's on the new Miles Davis album!".

    Here's the first section of Chuck's recording:

    https://audioboom.com/boos/875326-so...by-miles-davis

    Wayne wasn't impressed. I wonder if he knew that the opening bars of melody ended up as an inscription on Miles Davis' tombstone?

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...avis_grave.jpg

    If anyone wants to know more about Chuck, PM me. I've written an as yet unpublished book of transcriptions with a forward by Jack Wilkins that was proofread by both Pasquale and his teacher, Agostino Di Giorgio. I had access to Chuck's sketches and scores before they went to the LOC, and have been in constant contact with his widow, Diane. I've also held that "Sonny" acetate in my hands and urged Diane to get it digitally transferred before it went missing or became damaged!

  18. #17

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    Me Me Me, PMB, I would be more than interested to hear more about Chuck.

  19. #18

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  20. #19
    dortmundjazzguitar Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by PMB View Post
    The "Solar" story: Chuck wrote a tune called "Sonny" for his Woody Herman colleague, trumpeter Sonny Berman. They recorded it onto an acetate in Oklahoma in 1946 while touring. Miles was a friend of Sonny's. He heard the tune soon after and recorded it as "Solar" (the name gives away the source). The first Chuck heard about Miles' recording was when he came across Eddie Costa playing a version at a NY bar. Chuck was understandably shocked and asked Eddie how he learned the tune. Eddie replied, "It's on the new Miles Davis album!".

    Here's the first section of Chuck's recording:

    https://audioboom.com/boos/875326-so...by-miles-davis

    Wayne wasn't impressed. I wonder if he knew that the opening bars of melody ended up as an inscription on Miles Davis' tombstone?

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...avis_grave.jpg

    If anyone wants to know more about Chuck, PM me. I've written an as yet unpublished book of transcriptions with a forward by Jack Wilkins that was proofread by both Pasquale and his teacher, Agostino Di Giorgio. I had access to Chuck's sketches and scores before they went to the LOC, and have been in constant contact with his widow, Diane. I've also held that "Sonny" acetate in my hands and urged Diane to get it digitally transferred before it went missing or became damaged!
    is that a major chord at the beginning of sonny?

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Irez87 View Post
    Chuck Wayne...

    I have four albums of his now, he's got an interesting vibe and great lines:
    Chuck's "You Brought A New Kind Of Love To Me" (head and his solo) are transcribed in one of Jack Grassel's books. Tasty stuff indeed.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by PMB View Post
    The "Solar" story: Chuck wrote a tune called "Sonny" for his Woody Herman colleague, trumpeter Sonny Berman. They recorded it onto an acetate in Oklahoma in 1946 while touring. Miles was a friend of Sonny's. He heard the tune soon after and recorded it as "Solar" (the name gives away the source). The first Chuck heard about Miles' recording was when he came across Eddie Costa playing a version at a NY bar. Chuck was understandably shocked and asked Eddie how he learned the tune. Eddie replied, "It's on the new Miles Davis album!".
    Fascinating story. Not the first time I've read---here, even---of Miles taking credit for a tune someone else (apparently) wrote. Unfortunate, isn't it?
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  23. #22

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  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by dortmundjazzguitar View Post
    is that a major chord at the beginning of sonny?
    Would still be actionable as the melody is similar enough. The harmony doesn't fall under copyright.

    So - what lesson do we learn from this? Copyright your tunes!

  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by dortmundjazzguitar View Post
    is that a major chord at the beginning of sonny?
    Yes, Miles did make that change. Also, the recording here is in Db rather than C but I'm not sure if Miles transposed it down a semitone. Maybe Chuck and Sonny also played it in C but the tapes weren't running at the correct speed for the recording. I have lots of Chuck's original lead sheets but nothing for that tune.

  26. #25

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    Grasso just uploaded a new video to YouTube - a burning run through Monk's 'Hackensack'. The video gives a good look at his left hand fingerings.


    London Jazz Guitar Society:
    www.meetup.com/londonjazzguitarsociety
    LJGS on Twitter: www.twitter.com/LDNJazzGuitar

  27. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by David B View Post
    Grasso just uploaded a new video to YouTube - a burning run through Monk's 'Hackensack'. The video gives a good look at his left hand fingerings.

    Amazing finger independence.
    No, I'm not going to give you the answer to your question. I don't want to deny you the pleasure you'll receive when you figure it out yourself. -- Bill Evans talking to his brother.

  28. #27

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    I was lucky enough to see Chuck Wayne/Joe Puma Duo at the Holiday Inn (?) in New Haven around 1972...

    They had 1 hour free "concerts" at 12 pm on Fridays for a while, so it was --cut my performance seminar-- every week and see the likes of Zoot Sims Chuck Wayne // Bucky Pizzerelli and George Barnes etc or sit and listen to someone I didn't know play classical piano or Flute for an hour....

    just barely passed that course and brought my grade average down overall but I wouldn't have missed it for the world!~~!

  29. #28

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    A new studio release from Chris Byars' group with Pasquale Grasso:

    Pasquale Grasso-image-jpeg

    London Jazz Guitar Society:
    www.meetup.com/londonjazzguitarsociety
    LJGS on Twitter: www.twitter.com/LDNJazzGuitar

  30. #29

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    Thanks to Targuit for the heads-up on a new Pasquale Grasso video:


    London Jazz Guitar Society:
    www.meetup.com/londonjazzguitarsociety
    LJGS on Twitter: www.twitter.com/LDNJazzGuitar

  31. #30

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    Another video, uploaded today:


    London Jazz Guitar Society:
    www.meetup.com/londonjazzguitarsociety
    LJGS on Twitter: www.twitter.com/LDNJazzGuitar

  32. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fidelcaster View Post

    Jeez, the guy's not even breaking a sweat! Pretty amazing. [He's featured in the Feb 2016 Just Jazz Guitar mag.]

  33. #32

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    In his teens:


  34. #33

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    Incredibly good.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  35. #34
    destinytot Guest

  36. #35
    destinytot Guest
    Love the spice and sauce of Dan's lines as much as the intricacy of Pasquale's - but Pasquale's double-time from 6m49... !!!
    Last edited by destinytot; 03-12-2016 at 10:52 AM.

  37. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by David B View Post
    Grasso just uploaded a new video to YouTube - a burning run through Monk's 'Hackensack'. The video gives a good look at his left hand fingerings.


    He is an heir to Joe Pass, a very worthy one at that! The beauty of his playing is that he just does everything so well. Phrasing, fidelity to a melody and classic jazz harmonies. Martin Taylor must chuckle when he hears this video of Pasquale.

    Nice guitar sound to me. Signature.

  38. #37

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    Couple of observations meant in no way to defile Pasquale's ginormous talent and technique. I just took a spin at this song playing on my classical along with Pasquale. What I say here should be heard as simply my opinion.

    Apart from Pasquale being the best I ever heard at doing this song in this manner, it is doable. Though I would s-l-o-w it down about 20% with a Transcribe software or that type of thing. I should spring for it, though someone I know might squelch the deal right now. Don't misconstrue that comment. I believe that anything as articulated flawlessly at breakneck tempo can be heard and comprehended much better at a slower tempo. You can hear the artistry and subtleties of technique so much easier. Then, of course, you could take years to play it with the élan of Pasquale.

    I plead ignorance - I don't know this tune. But playing along here to this jump bebop blues song in F, my impression is that Pasquale is adhering to a melody, either in his head or 'the' melody of the song impeccably harmonized in a horn like manner, all executed at a breakneck tempo. Fabulous playing. Flawless.

    I'm going to have to go to the original source of this Monk tune. But to pull off what Pasquale has achieved here would seem to be masterful musicianship. And he does it on ever song. And that he and his brothers did this after some pasta and wine dinner at home blows my mind. The whole family is musical.

  39. #38
    destinytot Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by targuit View Post
    He is an heir to Joe Pass, a very worthy one at that! The beauty of his playing is that he just does everything so well. Phrasing, fidelity to a melody and classic jazz harmonies. Martin Taylor must chuckle when he hears this video of Pasquale.

    Nice guitar sound to me. Signature.
    For me, it's the specific 'bebop' heritage that makes Pasquale's playing so special - solo playing drawn from guitar and​ piano. Other brands exist...I think he's in a league of his own.

  40. #39

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    If you haven't been following the MMC thread in the 'Players' section, Grasso recently recorded a video for www.mymusicmasterclass.com - it'll be released in a few months.

    Pasquale Grasso-grassommc-jpg

    Quote Originally Posted by Adam Small View Post
    It will probably be a few months since we have so many videos in the queue right now, but it may be possible to push it out a little earlier...we'll see. He covers some great warm-ups/technical exercises, voicings, Barry Harris piano style stuff, solo playing, legato concepts and a bit more. It's gonna be cool!
    Last edited by David B; 03-15-2016 at 04:16 PM.

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  41. #40

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    Very classy do you know the venue. Best regards

  42. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by nodog View Post
    Very classy do you know the venue. Best regards
    In the first video? That's Mezzrow in NYC.

    London Jazz Guitar Society:
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  43. #42

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    David B,
    Thanks for the reply its been a long time since ive been in New York about 20 years and i did not get to any music venues . Im from Scotland but im thinking of going back for another visit and for sure will look up that club to see Mr Pasquale playing he is amazing. New York seems a fantastic place for guitarists. Best regards.

  44. #43

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    This is getting to be so old hat. Yet another fantastic performance by Pasquale. (Yawn...) Technically unbelievably good. E un paisano, of course. Bravo, Pasquale! Like Mike said - in a league of his own. Scary good.


  45. #44

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    Pasquale is an extra-ordinary musician, even by the stratospheric standards of today's young hot-housed college players.

    But let's be clear:

    - Parker invented these lines;

    - Joe Pass copied them from Parker by ear and "on the streets" (Joe states this himself);

    - Pasquale studied them with teachers in and out of college.

    I am 1000% certain Parker would not be playing like this if he were 25 years old today; I'm 99% certain that Joe wouldn't either.

    The question in my mind is - "what would they be doing?".

    Parker was an innovator, not because he thought it was cool to be an innovator; but because this style (never before heard) was part of his chemistry - he didn't "develop" his style, unlike, say, Coltrane or Miles, whose development as artists is clear from their recorded work.

    Joe Pass was not an innovator at all musically, despite his greatness as a guitarist.

    And this music is obviously not innovatory either; but music doesn't have to innovate all the time, does it.
    "Really welding was my talent, I think, but I sort of swished it aside." Wes

  46. #45

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    A new video from Grasso, uploaded last night.
    A medley of 'Glass Enclosure' / 'Sure Thing' / I've Never Been in Love Before'


    London Jazz Guitar Society:
    www.meetup.com/londonjazzguitarsociety
    LJGS on Twitter: www.twitter.com/LDNJazzGuitar

  47. #46

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    Hey Grasso, your classical is showing! I just love his playing man

  48. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by sunnysideup View Post
    Pasquale is an extra-ordinary musician, even by the stratospheric standards of today's young hot-housed college players.

    But let's be clear:

    - Parker invented these lines;

    - Joe Pass copied them from Parker by ear and "on the streets" (Joe states this himself);

    - Pasquale studied them with teachers in and out of college.

    I am 1000% certain Parker would not be playing like this if he were 25 years old today; I'm 99% certain that Joe wouldn't either.

    The question in my mind is - "what would they be doing?".

    Parker was an innovator, not because he thought it was cool to be an innovator; but because this style (never before heard) was part of his chemistry - he didn't "develop" his style, unlike, say, Coltrane or Miles, whose development as artists is clear from their recorded work.

    Joe Pass was not an innovator at all musically, despite his greatness as a guitarist.

    And this music is obviously not innovatory either; but music doesn't have to innovate all the time, does it.
    buzz killer.

  49. #48

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    this sort of music is great to play and it's an important aspect to learning jazz but come on, throw that conservative idealogy out the window, we don't need more wynton's around pretending like it's 1958, to me that sort of playing is gimmicky and meaningless

  50. #49
    destinytot Guest
    Remarkable group, with Pasquale Grasso playing like a pianist. (Interesting strings the bassist uses... great sound.)

  51. #50

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    I dig his way. I don't have nothing but respect for those who want to build from tradition.
    Today We can find several guitarists who claim about a departure from the past but they sound all the same.
    I heard more individuality in Grasso's playing than in those "innovators".
    He is so young and sure He will build his personality in the future, step by step. If He can play Bud Powell with a guitar he has no limits.