The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
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  1. #1

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    For your consideration...


    I have a vintage ES125. I believe its a 1958...could be a 59?


    As far as i can tell, the only thing that has been changed is the pickup. The previous owner said it just stopped working one day. He had another p90 installed by his local tech. The original pickups is included.


    Its in awesome condition for 64 years old!!! Beautiful tobacco burst! Incredible Brazilian board! No breaks or repairs.


    The neck is a full 50s carve.


    The knobs are the really tall gold speed knobs...like the ones on early les pauls.


    Truss rod works perfectly. It sets up great! Plays and sounds wonderful!!!


    Comes in an old chipboard case...doesnt really protect the guitar very well.


    $2700 plus shipping


    Thanks for looking!!!




    IMG_3736 by brent HENDERSON, on Flickr


    IMG_3738 by brent HENDERSON, on Flickr


    IMG_3739 by brent HENDERSON, on Flickr


    IMG_3744 by brent HENDERSON, on Flickr


    IMG_3740 by brent HENDERSON, on Flickr


    IMG_3741 by brent HENDERSON, on Flickr


    IMG_3742 by brent HENDERSON, on Flickr


    IMG_3743 by brent HENDERSON, on Flickr


    IMG_3745 by brent HENDERSON, on Flickr


    IMG_3746 by brent HENDERSON, on Flickr


  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    IMG_3747 by brent HENDERSON, on Flickr


    IMG_3748 by brent HENDERSON, on Flickr


    IMG_3749 by brent HENDERSON, on Flickr


    IMG_3750 by brent HENDERSON, on Flickr


    IMG_3751 by brent HENDERSON, on Flickr


    IMG_3752 by brent HENDERSON, on Flickr


    IMG_3753 by brent HENDERSON, on Flickr


    IMG_3754 by brent HENDERSON, on Flickr


    IMG_3755 by brent HENDERSON, on Flickr

  4. #3

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    Interesting, I didn't know that there were spruce top ES-125's. I thought they were all laminate maple.

  5. #4

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    Must be the laquer checking and aging that makes it look a bit like spruce.

    I've tried one of these a few months back. Lots of vibe obviously. Does not really sound like non-cutaway P90 equipped 175, but has it's own thing going on despite the build similarities, at least on paper. Had the chunkiest neck I've seen.

    Very cool guitars. Martijn van Iterson makes great sounds on his.


  6. #5

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    Those knobs suggest it is older than 1958. I believe a ‘58 or ‘59 would have gold “top hat” knobs, like these…
    Keith
    1958 Gibson ES-125-39fa1aef-687a-4d18-a351-95037da86ca2-jpeg

  7. #6

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    I'm pretty sure this guitar has mahogany sides and spruce top based on the pictures.
    Pictures (from the top) 5 and 6 shows the spruce grain lines. Older spruce guitars also sometimes have crack lines along the grain lines. You can also see the way the lines sparkle under the finish in close ups like spruce does.
    Also the pictures 10 and 11 show that the sides are mahogany. I'm not saying it's not a ES 125, but certainly not a typical one.

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175 View Post
    I'm pretty sure this guitar has mahogany sides and spruce top based on the pictures.
    The sides are mahogany. The only way to tell if they're laminated is at the jack-hole, but statistically they would be laminated.

    The top is laminated maple. I can see why you would look at the fracture lines and think it's spruce but this pic makes it clear that it's maple. It's not just the maple-lam grain; spruce would have a center seam and this doesn't:




    IME whether it's laminated has a much more powerful sonic influence than what kind of lamination.
    I'm not saying 'spruce ply sounds just like mahogany ply sounds just like maple ply." I am saying, "Even spruce ply sounds like ply."
    There are always exceptions but even so.
    Last edited by Sam Sherry; 08-08-2022 at 07:48 PM.

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by floatingpickup View Post
    Those knobs suggest it is older than 1958. I believe a ‘58 or ‘59 would have gold “top hat” knobs, like these…
    Keith
    Conversely, the tailpiece looks like chrome not nickel plating (i.e. mid-1965 or later)
    Maybe the knobs got swapped for repros at the same time -- not that I'm saying "Hey, those are repro knobs"
    Dating instruments by hardware is always second-best

  10. #9
    All ES-125's are laminated maple/mahogany/maple except for a small batch in the 1940s, which were mahogany/mahogany/mahogany (similar to the J-45 flattop, which was also produced with a mahogany top for a short time in the 1940s). This top is unmistakably maple, although the finish checking does make it look like spruce up close. All nitro-finished hollowbody guitars this old will have extensive finish checking, regardless of what the top is made of. The cracks, though, need not follow the grain lines although they will typically be vertical on the top.

  11. #10

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    " All nitro-finished hollowbody guitars this old will have extensive finish checking, regardless of what the top is made of. "

    The majority yes, all? No.

  12. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon View Post
    " All nitro-finished hollowbody guitars this old will have extensive finish checking, regardless of what the top is made of. "

    The majority yes, all? No.
    Unless they've been kept at a more or less constant temperature throughout, which is extremely unlikely, given that these guitars have typically been used a lot (as opposed to locked away in a refrigerator) and the lacquer gets more brittle as it ages. I've seen a lot of vintage guitars and owned a few and I have yet to see an archtop or hollow body from the 50s, especially one made of solid wood, without any cracks in the lacquer.

  13. #12

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    I concur that the oldest 125's would likely be mahogany laminate and mahogany neck.
    The speed knobs were common. The earliest having no numbers and being much taller versions. Flat backs.
    Serial numbers are horribly confusing and lead to misdating frequently.
    Some pics of my '46. Great guitars.
    1958 Gibson ES-125-20220808_151327-jpg
    1958 Gibson ES-125-20220808_151421-jpg

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Minor Seven Flat Five View Post
    Unless they've been kept at a more or less constant temperature throughout, which is extremely unlikely, given that these guitars have typically been used a lot (as opposed to locked away in a refrigerator) and the lacquer gets more brittle as it ages. I've seen a lot of vintage guitars and owned a few and I have yet to see an archtop or hollow body from the 50s, especially one made of solid wood, without any cracks in the lacquer.

    I have a couple from the mid 60s right here, zero checking. Not likely but not impossible.

  15. #14

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    Ttt

  16. #15

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    Ttt

  17. #16

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    make me an offer

  18. #17

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    Ttt

  19. #18

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    Sold