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  1. #1

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    Not my listing / no financial interest. Just figured this crowd would be interested. Saw it over at the cafe...

    Mandolin Classifieds

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    $3650? Seems reasonable given condition.

  4. #3

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    Too much for one that's had the neck off and finish work imo

  5. #4

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    I agree I am always a bit cautious about Gibson's that have had the neck off. Normally Gibson's rarely ever need a neck set they are very good for that aspect compared to most other guitars. They have a mortise and tenon and not the easiest to get off and done correct. An ace can do it for sure but I always wonder what happened that cause the problem in the first place. It is a beautiful guitar. I happen to price L7's on reverb just for fun now and they are the best buy I think for authentic archtops that at least have some resale if you decide to sell.

  6. #5

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    Deacon Mark, curious what you mean, when you say Gibsons(from '41?) have a 'mortise and tenon' (neck joint?). I believe they have a dovetail joint in that period. IMO, the complicating factor, in resetting a Gibson neck, is that Gibson assembled the neck to the body, before finishing: the lacquer at the neck/body joint can(but not always) chip off, when doing a reset(requiring significant touch up). But a well done neck reset(and Gibson archtops do sometimes benefit from them) is not a reason to shy away, IMO.

    The '41 L-7 in question is a great looking example, I think.

  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by daverepair
    Deacon Mark, curious what you mean, when you say Gibsons(from '41?) have a 'mortise and tenon' (neck joint?). I believe they have a dovetail joint in that period. IMO, the complicating factor, in resetting a Gibson neck, is that Gibson assembled the neck to the body, before finishing: the lacquer at the neck/body joint can(but not always) chip off, when doing a reset(requiring significant touch up). But a well done neck reset(and Gibson archtops do sometimes benefit from them) is not a reason to shy away, IMO.

    The '41 L-7 in question is a great looking example, I think.
    dave i have never reset a neck on a Gibson of any type. I had always heard the used s mortise and tenon not tradition dovetail. Maybe that referred to solid bodies like les pauls?
    Help me out in this who knows I might need to sometime and have to figure it out.

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by deacon Mark
    dave i have never reset a neck on a Gibson of any type. I had always heard the used s mortise and tenon not tradition dovetail. Maybe that referred to solid bodies like les pauls? Help me out in this who knows I might need to sometime and have to figure it out.
    I've worked on a pile of them and can confirm that Gibson archtops are built with dovetail joints.

    Les Paul-style and ES-3x5 Gibsons are built with mortise/tenon joints and the specifics of those joints have been discussed ad nauseum by the Les Paul weenies on various Les Paul forums.

    A few others:
    -Heritage archtops are built with mortise/tenon neck joints.
    -Hofner archtops are built with mortise/tenon neck joints.
    -Campellone archtops are built with dovetail neck joints.
    and so forth.
    Last edited by Hammertone; 03-30-2020 at 10:30 AM.

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by lukmanohnz
    Not my listing / no financial interest. Just figured this crowd would be interested. Saw it over at the cafe...Mandolin Classifieds
    Looks like it has been heavily renovated and has a lot of question marks, but still a very cool guitar.

  10. #9

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    Hammertone’s correct, it’s the Les Pauls/solid bodies which have a tenon joint.

    And, adding to Hammertone’s list, Vega arctops, from the early 50’s at least, have a shallow ‘neck heel’ tenon, like a violin( where the neck heel is a butt joint, set 1/4” into the body. Uhh, don’t ask how I know this...

  11. #10

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    Shouldn't the scale be 25.5" on that one?

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by nopedals
    Shouldn't the scale be 25.5" on that one?
    Yes, it should have the longer scale. The guitar is quite similar to yours, IIRC. It's possible that the seller has simply made a mistake and that the guitar has a longer scale - his description suggests that he is not that familiar with these guitars. But, this is where it gets interesting. Gibson no doubt had some Advanced-scale necks left over when they changed their archtop designs in 1938, so one might find the occasional pre-war archtop with the newer body style and older neck style. It's also possible that a customer specifically ordered an L-7 with the shorter scale. I don't have a copy of the Gibson ledger page that lists that serial number - that may or may not be useful to see if was a special order.
    Last edited by Hammertone; 04-03-2020 at 03:50 AM.

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hammertone
    I've worked on a pile of them and can confirm that Gibson archtops are built with dovetail joints.

    -Heritage archtops are built with mortise/tenon neck joints.
    Now THAT is very interesting, considering how Heritage is thought of as carrying on the Gibson tradition.

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by daverepair
    Deacon Mark, curious what you mean, when you say Gibsons(from '41?) have a 'mortise and tenon' (neck joint?). I believe they have a dovetail joint in that period. IMO, the complicating factor, in resetting a Gibson neck, is that Gibson assembled the neck to the body, before finishing: the lacquer at the neck/body joint can(but not always) chip off, when doing a reset(requiring significant touch up). But a well done neck reset(and Gibson archtops do sometimes benefit from them) is not a reason to shy away, IMO.

    The '41 L-7 in question is a great looking example, I think.
    Ditto. One of the best guitar decisions I've ever made was buying a '44 L7 knowing it needed the neck reset, fretboard leveled, and refretted. That was when I had an excellent luthier nearby! The price factored in the needed work, so i was entirely comfortable with the choices i made. Still am. It was a player, and will continue to be played for many years to come!

  15. #14

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    My '63 Super-400CES had the top re-finished and a neck reset - all professionally done many years ago - and was priced accordingly so I was able to buy it. It's not a collector's item but IMHO no such guitar should ever end up in a display case or on someone's wall, it needs to be played so people can hear what a great archtop can sound like !
    This L7 looks mighty fine and I'm sure that in the hands of an able strummer it will most certainly make some beautiful noises ....