1. #1

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    So I have a Tele or an Ibanez AFJ85 going into a Lexicon LXP 1 reverb unit going into a Vox AC15C1 (I'm experimenting with both channels and all settings).

    I'm recording the Vox with either a Shure 57, Shure 58 or Rhode NT1A through a Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 into Reaper.

    I'm trying to get closer to the sound in the track below as my sound is currently some way off.

    I don't want to copy the sound perfectly but I'd like to get nearer.

    Just to add that my music room is not a proper studio but still

    Any tips would be appreciated.

    Thank you

    Last edited by Liarspoker; 12-07-2021 at 11:33 AM.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Man, that was one of the best jazz songs I've ever heard. Wow.

    It's pretty dark, but still clear so I would say your best shot would be to use the condenser but put it right up on the cone. This makes it bassy kind of like a dynamic but you'll still get crisp detail. Then use whatever effects. It sounds like the reverb? effect is mostly in the daw or you could approach it that way if you aren't able to get that sound out of the amp.

  4. #3
    Thanks Clint. I'll try a condenser onto the cone.

    I've added an MXR carbon echo in the chain which gets me a bit closer too.

    I know that Ben uses two amps but I don't think that is the secret to the great tone.

    It is great music isn't it. So many surprises

  5. #4

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    No prob. Yes, great music. I was very surprised. Yeah so my reasoning is 1. gotta use a condenser because they offer the top end detail which that tone has. Dynamic mics won't really get you there at reasonable volumes. Then 2. you just gotta decide on placement. If you place a condenser about 3-4 inches or more away from the amp, it starts to pick up the room which can be a benefit, and it thins it out a bit and sounds more acousticy. This recording doesn't have that, it's direct and bassy. So you want to have it close to the amp, condensers will sound more compressed and bassy within a couple inch threshold from the speaker. Then there's just the axis of from the cone to the edge of the speaker. Cone is bassier, edge is brighter. I think you'll be able to get where you want using those principles.

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Clint 55
    Cone is bassier, edge is brighter.
    I thought it was the other way round? Aiming the mic directly at the cone gives more brightness. Moving the mic towards the edge reduces it.

    At least that’s what I’ve read, and the few times I’ve tried mic’ing an amp seemed to bear it out.

    Some info here which might be useful:
    How To Record Guitar Cabs With One Mic

  7. #6

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    Oops

    Sorry about that. But yes, 2 axis to think about. The axis of distance from the speaker, and axis of cone to edge.
    Last edited by Clint 55; 12-08-2021 at 04:13 PM.

  8. #7

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    This came to my mind immediately after the first few bars : he plays with his fingers (with nails), not with a pick. His touch is very delicate, he lets the strings vibrate as long as possible and plucks the low notes with the flesh of his thumb. The reverb sounds like a more expensive software, def. studio quality. It's a unique and beautiful take on that great old tune !

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Liarspoker
    So I have a Tele or an Ibanez AFJ85 going into a Lexicon LXP 1 reverb unit going into a Vox AC15C1 (I'm experimenting with both channels and all settings).

    I'm recording the Vox with either a Shure 57, Shure 58 or Rhode NT1A through a Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 into Reaper.

    I'm trying to get closer to the sound in the track below as my sound is currently some way off.

    I don't want to copy the sound perfectly but I'd like to get nearer.

    Just to add that my music room is not a proper studio but still

    Any tips would be appreciated.

    Thank you

    I think that tone is mainly a function of him playing through two Fender amps, both turned up pretty loud, with the guitar signal split via the delay, along with quite a bit of digital reverb. The delay itself sounds fairly long to me, with a fair amount of repeats, but mixed pretty low. The richness of the tone comes from the amps being somewhat overdriven and him managing tone and dynamics via his technique. The atmosphere of it comes from the stereo sound being captured by a multi-mic set-up that picks up the sound of the amps in the room. I don't think you can nail that by tweaking a single mic and amp set-up. If you have two amps and two mics, go for it. But it's pretty tricky to record a stereo amp rig, and I suspect you'll get closer using an amp sim and a stereo delay in your DAW (that has been experience, anyway).

    He describes his set-up here: Ben Monder: Interview with Bowie's 'Blackstar' Guitarist
    Last edited by John A.; 12-10-2021 at 06:45 PM.

  10. #9

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    Side note: Man.. what a great collection of guitar sounds and playing on this CD. He's playing with The Bad Plus now which seems a good match.