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  1. #1

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    I have ask this before but will again as things change. I have never done any recording and playing from a digital stand point. Can someone suggest a package set up that is ok and does the job for home recording? I don't want to spend huge fortunes on this because i am busy person and find that just sitting down playing acoustic archtop my bag but it need to give this a go. Here are some suggestions from Sweetwater, Do any of you use these?

    recording bundle | Sweetwater

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    I have a Focusrite 2i2. It's a nice interface for the money. I can't comment on the bundles. Do you use a Mac or PC? If a Mac, then I believe it comes with recording software (at least it did when I still owned one). If a PC then Reaper is free to try and cheap to buy with lots of features.

  4. #3

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  5. #4

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    Yes the Focusrite 2i2 will do the job.

    Are you recording acoustically or thru an amp? ... Many musicians already have gear such as amps, mics, mic cables, mic stands, headphones, all of which can be used. If you have these perhaps you don't need a bundle and just buy the Focurite interface or some other audio interface.

    I'd also say this won't be just ok, it will be actually pretty great. The technology is affordable and surprisingly good.

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by fep
    Yes the Focusrite 2i2 will do the job.

    Are you recording acoustically or thru an amp? ... Many musicians already have gear such as amps, mics, mic cables, mic stands, headphones, all of which can be used. If you have these perhaps you don't need a bundle and just buy the Focurite interface or some other audio interface.

    I'd also say this won't be just ok, it will be actually pretty great. The technology is affordable and surprisingly good.
    I have guitars and amps but not mics or mic cables. I don't even have headphones. I would like to record both ways acoustic and with the amp. Does this bundle include the interface or do I need to get that separate? This stuff is not my forte I spend too much time repairing and playing guitars so recording and such is just zero to me. I come from the early 1980's when we had Martze Superscope tape player to record and play things over. I am can handle computers but I just have done much with recording and getting things set up.

  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by deacon Mark
    I have ask this before but will again as things change. I have never done any recording and playing from a digital stand point. Can someone suggest a package set up that is ok and does the job for home recording? I don't want to spend huge fortunes on this because i am busy person and find that just sitting down playing acoustic archtop my bag but it need to give this a go. Here are some suggestions from Sweetwater, Do any of you use these?

    recording bundle | Sweetwater
    The first things we need to know is what your budget for this home studio is and what style you play.

    Also you are going to need software for recording.

    BTW-have you thought about an all in one hardware like these:

    https://www.amazon.ca/DP-008EX-Porta...ruments&sr=1-2

  8. #7
    After looking at this I see the bundles some with software download. My budget is rock bottom that will just let me record for myself and some playback. Seems these on the Sweetwater page seem to be my level.

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by deacon Mark
    After looking at this I see the bundles some with software download. My budget is rock bottom that will just let me record for myself and some playback. Seems these on the Sweetwater page seem to be my level.
    Try Audacity-free software and adequate for just recording yourself.

    Audacity (R) | Free, open source, cross-platform audio software for multi-track recording and editing.

  10. #9

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    I have the Focusrite 2i2 (about $100) and I use it with Reaper (free to evaluate, $60 to buy).

    I use my laptop to run Reaper. The Focusrite plugs right in with a USB cable.

    If you're recording a guitar with a pickup you can go right into the Focusrite (which, in effect, becomes part of your computer). You can monitor with a guitar amp. It will work fine. Don't let any recording-philes see this, or they'll tell you you're crazy to monitor with a guitar amp. I do it and the results have been played on the radio.

    If you want to record a guitar without a pickup, then you need a microphone. You can get a fine one for about $100 (Sennheiser 609, which is what I have and sounds fine to me). You can drape the mic from the handle of the amp, or you can use a mic stand.

    That's about it. You can get started for the price of the Focusrite. Then, buy Reaper and a mic. $260.

  11. #10

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    I really like the Zoom H8. The H6 probably has all the features I need, but for a while the H8 was on sale for the same price. I wanted something portable and easy to set up, so I’ve avoided audio adapters. I can record to the included XY stereo mic, plug in direct, plug in the line out from my amp, or use up to six external mics (8 with an optional module). I can quickly record ideas in any room of the house or layer multiple tracks over a backing track. With a bit more mic’ing equipment I could record a decent demo of a small jazz ensemble. I can also use it as an audio interface to a PC or Mac, but why bother when I can record direct to the H8? It can be connected as an audio adapter to an IOS device, but only two tracks (“stereo mode”). That could be useful for video recording or live-streaming though. I can also mix a multitrack recording on the H8, or if I need a more full-featured app mixing, move the tracks to a computer.

    If I didn’t need all the tracks and capability of the H8, I’d consder one of the cheaper models in the H series. I’ve used an H2 for years but that has no multitrack or external mic capability. The H4N is much better since it adds a couple of XLR inputs with phantom power. I think earlier models have noisier preamps though.

    Those Sweetwater bundles you linked to include mics, headphones, etc. Those choices very much depend on what you intend to record and your budget. If you’ll be more specific about that I’m sure folks here can help.

    H8 | ZOOM

    H6 Audio Recorder | ZOOM

    Here's a quick demo done on my kitchen counter this morning. I played an iReal Pro backing track on my iPad which was plugged into the XY stereo input of the H8. I plugged an Eastman AR810CE into the B channel using a Fender Twin effect. Then I mixed, adding a bit of reverb. The most time consuming thing was attaching the recording to a video on my PC and uploading to Youtube so I could share it here. (Please ignore a couple of clams!)
    Last edited by KirkP; 03-16-2021 at 04:11 PM.

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by rpjazzguitar
    I have the Focusrite 2i2 (about $100) and I use it with Reaper (free to evaluate, $60 to buy).

    I use my laptop to run Reaper. The Focusrite plugs right in with a USB cable.

    ...

    This. Though the prices have gone up over time for the hardware. You probably don't need the extra features of the dual channel Focusrite 2i2 ($170) vs the less expensive single channel Focusrite Solo ($120). People recommend Focusrite because you don't have to fight software drivers and the answer to any question you might have is a quick Internet search away.

    You plug a guitar (or line out from an amp or preamp) into the Focusrite and plug the Focusrite into your PC using a USB cable (not sure if this is included or not.. cheap online). At that point your computer can 'see' the signal and you can monitor using whatever you use for sound on your PC using the RCA outputs or headphones. You may yell at it some getting everything set up but when it all works you'll see that it's pretty simple.

    You'll need to use recording software to put down tracks. This is the part that actually requires a little time. Not hard. But does take some getting used to. I would start with Reaper (still $60) because it's as simple as anything else at the basic level but won't limit you later. You can download and try it free. The online support including basic youtube tutorials is great.

    Recording acoustic guitar is another step in the process that you may wish to leave for another day. Getting a microphone to work is easy. Getting it to sound good depends on how you define 'good'.

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spook410
    I would start with Reaper (still $60) because it's as simple as anything else at the basic level but won't limit you later. You can download and try it free. The online support including basic youtube tutorials is great.
    I have come to believe that the $60 I spent on Reaper is the best deal I ever got on anything. The license is for life, the software is often updated, and it can do a lot more than you'll ever need for it to.

    (By the way, I use the Scarlett 2i2 for guitar and vocals. I use EZDrummer for drum tracks and they easily go into Reaper.)

  14. #13

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    I have the Presonus audio interface. And it does a really good job. The PreSonus bundle (including headphones & monitors) looks really good and it also comes with Studio One as a DAW.

  15. #14

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    I was looking for a 2-channel interface and couldn't really decide. Been browsing around checking the reviews (which I dont trust anymore.. except some technical ones).
    The reviewers tend to avoid talking about sound. Knobs, plugs and "it sounds so good" - which means nothing at all anyway.
    Not many A vs. B with sound examples around.
    So this was interesting Focusrite's budget Scarlett vs top notch Clarett. So I found this:

    If you find that the difference is obvious and clear to you, you might not want to settle with the lesser one. Because it's a matter of music, not podcasting or streaming.

  16. #15

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    the easy way to record is with a zoom camera....The sound quality is pretty darn good. One of these days I will get a interface and have to learn to use a DAW. I have been putting that off. The newer zooms cost a few hundred bucks, I believe

  17. #16

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    Focusrite and Reaper is a classic starter combination with which you can't go wrong. I bought a Zoom U44 instead of the Focusrite simply for it's ability to act as a mobile recording unit (also runs on batteries) - easy to set up and use.

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by emanresu
    I was looking for a 2-channel interface and couldn't really decide. Been browsing around checking the reviews (which I dont trust anymore.. except some technical ones).
    The reviewers tend to avoid talking about sound. Knobs, plugs and "it sounds so good" - which means nothing at all anyway.
    Not many A vs. B with sound examples around.
    So this was interesting Focusrite's budget Scarlett vs top notch Clarett. So I found this:

    If you find that the difference is obvious and clear to you, you might not want to settle with the lesser one. Because it's a matter of music, not podcasting or streaming.
    I'm a bit of a skeptic, one would need to do a blind test. It would have been better if he hid the identities until the end. I could hear the "air" thing, which is probably EQ.

    Somewhere, I ran across a blind test of various interfaces, I couldn't tell which was better or more expensive, and those were wav files.

    They no doubt both do a great job recording audio, save some money or buy for features. The same can generally be said for DAW software.

    There is a weakest link idea, improve your weakest link. You can take a great recording, like something from AJA or Gaucho by Steely Dan, import it to your DAW, patch the output back into the input of the interface and record it to a separate track. If you can't tell the difference between the tracks, your DAW and your audio interface is not a problem. Invest somewhere else in the chain, like new guitar strings or something. New guitar strings are going to make a much bigger difference than the difference between interfaces.
    Last edited by fep; 03-18-2021 at 07:21 PM.

  19. #18

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    I use my guitar straight into a 2 channel Behringer interface UMC204HD (<$100) then into my laptop running Reaper software. Sometimes, I tweak a MIDI backing track in Power Trax (a BIAB product), then save it as a .wav or .mp3 then open in Reaper and record along with it. If I'm recording acoustic guitar, I use either an SM57, an Audio Technica 2035 large condenser, or a pair of Behringer C2 small condensers. If you have BIAB, you can make a track and open it directly in Reaper (lots if YT vids). My whole system is super simple and didn't cost much. I highly recommend Reaper as it's easy to get started (again, lots of vids) and you can even sync video to your audio right there in the program. Another thing that gives unbelievably good recording quality is the Zoom H1N recorder for about $100 - put it in front of your amp or acoustic guitar, record your tune, transfer to reaper, add effects and output it as an .mp3 or .wav. I don't think you have to go crazy to get reasonably good home recordings - some folks get really into it but if you just want to record something for family and friends or even You Tube, the above works just fine.

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by deacon Mark
    After looking at this I see the bundles some with software download. My budget is rock bottom that will just let me record for myself and some playback. Seems these on the Sweetwater page seem to be my level.
    For your minimalist use case, rock bottom budget, and simplicity I’d recommend considering the Zoom H4N Pro. If if you really want to keep the budget low, look for a used H4N.

    http://www.sam-mallery.com/2019/09/i...-zoom-h4n-pro/

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by fep
    I'm a bit of a skeptic, one would need to do a blind test. It would have been better if he hid the identities until the end. I could hear the "air" thing, which is probably EQ.
    He had this "air" thing off at some point. Listen to those. With Clarett, you can hear the room echo much better (that's a solid hint which is better at capturing nuances), you can hear the bass drum fading rumble. And it's just more "real". 3D.. better.
    Listen to delicate details, not the bang.

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by emanresu
    He had this "air" thing off at some point. Listen to those. With Clarett, you can hear the room echo much better (that's a solid hint which is better at capturing nuances), you can hear the bass drum fading rumble. And it's just more "real". 3D.. better.
    Listen to delicate details, not the bang.
    With fresh ears this morning, the comparison (not including the "air" examples), I can hear a difference but not in the reverb, to me it sounds more like an EQ difference between the two interfaces. I do prefer the Clarett but I'm one that is usually going for the lower pitched sounding vintage drums over the more modern drum sound. I am 63 and can only hear to 13k which is about average for my age. I think blind, I can prefer one of the other, but I wouldn't feel like I could tell which one was more expensive. I think maybe I could get there with some EQ adjustment on the Scarlet.