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  1. #1

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    I am a very casual user of Audacity, but can do what I need to do (not that much) with that tool. This would be things like noise reduction, normalization, maybe some EQ and reverb, and not much more.

    I also own a video tool called Wondershare. I have used it a half dozen times for mostly editing out unwanted sections of stuff and/or maybe splicing a couple of things together.

    If I want to do a little "Audacity Stuff' to the audio portion of a video file (captured by a webcam), is the basic approach here going to be to load the audio into Audacity which seems trivial to do. Do whatever processing is needed. Then, assuming that I didn't change the timeline of the audio file save it back to whatever format it came from, strip out the audio from the video file using Wondershare, and replace the audio with the file I just processed with Audacity.

    Then using Wondershare I can do whatever cutting, adding trailers and stuff, etc that I choose. Or would it be better to capture with Audacity and my webcam software simultaneously and then do the merge?

    Is that how folks would do this?

    Thanks.

    dave
    Gibson ES-175D
    Eastman AR905CD-BD
    Jesus Marzal Classical (Cedar)
    Ashley Sanders Classical (Spruce)
    Garcia Classical (mostly used as wall art)
    Yamaha SLG200NW Nylon-Electric

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  3. #2

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    I always record the audio simultaneously into a separate recording device, then tidy it up, mix it, add some reverb, etc. in Audacity, and then drop it into the timeline under the video in my video program. I just line it up visually or by ear with the waveform that was captured by the webcam (so that it is in sync), then I suppress the 'original' webcam audio.

    Reason for all this is simply that the original webcam audio doesn't sound much good to me.

    On the other hand, if you're talking about an existing video where you're stuck with what you've got, then your method sounds reasonable (assuming your software lets you do everything you described).

  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveLeeNC View Post
    I am a very casual user of Audacity, but can do what I need to do (not that much) with that tool. This would be things like noise reduction, normalization, maybe some EQ and reverb, and not much more.

    I also own a video tool called Wondershare. I have used it a half dozen times for mostly editing out unwanted sections of stuff and/or maybe splicing a couple of things together.

    If I want to do a little "Audacity Stuff' to the audio portion of a video file (captured by a webcam), is the basic approach here going to be to load the audio into Audacity which seems trivial to do. Do whatever processing is needed. Then, assuming that I didn't change the timeline of the audio file save it back to whatever format it came from, strip out the audio from the video file using Wondershare, and replace the audio with the file I just processed with Audacity.

    Then using Wondershare I can do whatever cutting, adding trailers and stuff, etc that I choose. Or would it be better to capture with Audacity and my webcam software simultaneously and then do the merge?

    Is that how folks would do this?

    Thanks.

    dave
    That is the basic approach except like grahambop, I record audio through a nice mic into my DAW while simultaneously capturing the video with my smart phone. I bring them both into my video editor software, line them up, then mute the audio on the video track (to just use the audio from that mic and DAW).

    One nice thing is this way you can multi-track. I often will record multiple parts, like this one where I recorded rhythm guitar, bass guitar, lead guitar (drums I sequenced together with EZdrummer 2)

    B+
    Frank (aka fep)

  5. #4

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    Thanks for the comments. This confirms what I suspected. And it is probably best to do a simultaneous capture.

    dave
    Gibson ES-175D
    Eastman AR905CD-BD
    Jesus Marzal Classical (Cedar)
    Ashley Sanders Classical (Spruce)
    Garcia Classical (mostly used as wall art)
    Yamaha SLG200NW Nylon-Electric