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  1. #1

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    I've decided to humiliate myself beyond my room.

    What equipment do you guys (and gals) use to make a video to post on youtube?

    What's an inexpensive way to get a good sound?

    I'm totally new at this. All suggestions are welcome.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    I've wondered about this very thing myself. I sometimes think about being humiliated somewhere other than my livingroom as well. Curious to see the suggestions.

  4. #3

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    Capturing decent video for YouTube is not too hard these days, most laptops and smartphones can do it well enough. I have started using my iPad for this, it has a better onboard video camera than anything else I’ve got.

    What is harder is to get good audio. I use a Korg SOS recorder to capture the audio part. I edit/mix the audio file and add reverb etc. using Audacity. Then I match up the video file and the audio file using some video software on my desktop PC.

    So it’s all a bit fiddly really. Which is why lots of folks just do the whole thing on a phone and put up with not-so-great sound.

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop View Post
    ...which is why lots of folks just do the whole thing on a phone and put up with not-so-great sound.
    That could work to my advantage ....

  6. #5

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    I've done a lot of videotaping myself playing music. It's been an evolution so what I do now is maybe about the end of the process of getting myself set up for recording music videos. I use Reaper and microphones for the audio. Reaper is a software used for recording multitrack recordings and is really robust but inexpensive and is used by pro recording studios.

    I have a couple condenser microphones and a dynamic microphone that I use for various things. For my guitar I use my Dynamic Shure sm57 placed really close to the speaker but towards the rim of the speaker. For vocals I use a dynamic mic, for acoustic guitar and vocal recordings I use a condensor mic, for my bass I go in direct.

    I record the video on my phone, which can create good HD quality videos. I combine the video and the audio in a video editing software, I've just started to use a software called VSDC, it is working well for me and is not too resource intensive. The thing about video editing software is they take a lot of computer resources, the previous ones I've used kept crashing my computer. Serious video editing folks have powerful computers. This is probably a lot more than what you want to do but it's kind of my hobby, I really enjoy the process. Please ask any questions if you're interested in all this.

    Then again you can just use a smart phone, they can do a surprisingly good job (no multitracking with a smart phone like I do though)
    B+
    Frank (aka fep)

  7. #6

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    There may be some apps which allow simple multitracking on a phone, I think I’ve seen some references to this somewhere.

    But I am a dinosaur without a smartphone so I don’t know any more than that!

  8. #7

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    Well, first of all I'm still using my flip phone from 2007, so that rules out smartphone video.

    Frank, it's not my place to ask how much you have invested in equipment to record your videos, but I can tell it's more than I want to spend.

    I guess you guys will just have to come see me live.

  9. #8

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    A Berklee instructor recommended Apogee for both audio/video. I didn't go for it though. I use Cubase to record myself and a cell phone for the vid (which also captures sound, but it's not audiophile quality).

    Then I replace the cell phone audio with what I have recorded in Cubase by importing both into a video editing program. It's called Cyberlink.


    Syncing them up is easy if you have some big signal. I usually just strum a big loud chord. That makes a visible spike on the tracks, then I align them from that point of reference.

  10. #9

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    Uncle Vinny, I don't think the video quality is that important, the audio quality is more important. I had been using lower video quality to avoid my computer crashing, lower quality equals smaller files, videos are huge files. (With this more recent video editor I've been trying I'm able to use higher quality videos. This is brand new for me and I've only tested it, I haven't published anything yet with it). I often use multiple video files which is why that software was crashing.

    Here is an example with not so great video quality using my phone and my previous video editor software (the crashy software):



    To your question on how much this all costs... On the cheap but pretty much getting the same quality as what I do:

    Audacity (multitrack music software): Free
    VSDC (video editing software): Free
    Mic MCA SP1 (the one I use): $50 Amazon.com: MCA-SP1 Large Capsule Condenser Microphone.: Musical Instruments
    Mic Stand: $20
    Mic Cable: $15
    Audio interface: $70
    Web Cam: $20

    Total about $200.

    This all assumes you already have a computer and headphones or speakers. Also assumes your flip phone won't work for videos.

    I have a lot more invested as I've been doing this for a long time, I've got a bunch of stuff I no longer use... like my mixing board, tape recorder etc. The big piece missing from above is studio reference speakers, you'll want those if you get serious about recording.
    B+
    Frank (aka fep)

  11. #10

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    I recently purchased a Zoom QN2 from Guitar Center ~$150.

    Best thing about the zoom is the sound, like having a pair of X-Y overheads.
    Also, many "scene" options for the video so you can tune in your visual effect...

    Super easy to use and ... Best of all.....

    It didn't break when it captured my ugly mug, although it likely wanted to!


    • High-quality 160 Degree wide-angle lens (F2.0, 16.6 mm)
    • 10 “Scene” presets for use in a variety of different lighting environments
    • Built-in X/Y stereo microphones, capable of handling very loud music sound levels up to 120 dB SPL
    • Capture up to 24-bit/96 kHz high resolution audio, with data saved in MPEG-4 format for video and WAV format for audio-only recordings and Records directly to micro SD/SDHC/SDXC cards up to 128 GB for extended recording times
    • Video resolutions and frame rates: HD 1080p / 30 fps, HD 1080p / 24 fps, HD 720p / 30 fps , HD 720p / 24 fps,Audio formats:WAV (24-bit/96 kHz, 24-bit/48 kHz, 16-bit/44.1 kHz)
    • Audio functions: Lo-Cut filter (off, 80Hz, 120Hz, or 160Hz), Auto Gain
    measure with micrometer... mark with chalk... cut with axe

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Vinnie View Post
    I've decided to humiliate myself beyond my room.

    What equipment do you guys (and gals) use to make a video to post on youtube?

    What's an inexpensive way to get a good sound?

    I'm totally new at this. All suggestions are welcome.
    These are the ways I've done it

    1. Android phone using the phone's internal mic and -- The video is pretty good. In a noisy environment, the audio is pretty bad because the phone's native automatic gain (level) control pumps and breathes like crazy. In a quieter environment, with careful placement of the phone close to the amp or guitar, the audio is decent. However, it can be tricky to place the phone so that you get both good audio and good video.

    2. Android phone using a zoom an external mic and/or audio interface (I use a Zoom H2 which is a handheld combination stereo mic + digital recorded + USB audio interface -- This allows you to place the phone for good video, and place the mic separately (within the reach of the cable connecting the two) for good audio. Android requires a third party app (I use one called Open Camera) to work with an external audio source. This set up works quite well. The H2 has excellent mic's and various options for setting and controlling levels. I haven't tried this, but it's also possible to use an analog source (such as a plain old microphone), with an adaptor to go from the mic's plug to the phone's input jack. If you have an apple phone, there are a bunch of external mics/interfaces that don't require third party apps. Whether you use Apple or Android, the result is the same -- A video with better sound than you can get from the phone's built in camera, but you can't really edit the sound separately without getting into more involved editing software than is native to the phone.

    3. Computer (Macbook) built-in video camera for video capture + audio recorded into recording software (I use GarageBand) -- I typically record direct into the computer rather than mic'ing an amp and use Garageband's amp simulation plug-ins. This affords the best audio quality, but it can be tricky to position the computer for good picture with all the audio stuff plugged into it. It's also a bit tricky to start and stop the video app (Photo Booth) and the audio app. You then have to import both the resultant audio and video into video editing software and sync and edit them (I use Imovie), which can be a bit of a headache.

    4. Phone for video capture + audio recorded into computer recording (same as above for audio). This affords the best (separate) video and audio quality, best post-recording editing options, and most flexible placement of both camera and mic. But it can be tricky to run all of the devices and software on your own. If you recorded the video on the camera (as opposed to onto the computer), you then have to import the resultant video onto your computer and into the editing software (+ audio) and then edit and sync. software and sync them (I use imovie), which can be a bit of a headache. [You can also use a real camera instead of the phone, possibly plugging an external mic into it, but I don't do that]

    Most of the time I do 1. (for quick stuff where I don't really care about quality) or 3. for better quality. In theory, 2 is actually the easiest way to get good sound and video together, but I can only get away with mic'ing an amp during the day when nobody else is home, a rarity. That, and the amp plug-ins sound as good as mic'ing an amp in my non-studio environment.

    John

  13. #12

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    I also use the zoom....an older version....I agree its easy to use and the sound and picture quality are very good.....I have tried to figure out how all these interfaces work...the scarlett and the countless others..they are inexpensive.....Apparently, you have problems with them if you don't have enough RAM ….I checked into that and my computer, does not have the recommended amount.....anyway...I was interested in them because, correct me if I am wrong.....you record with headphones on....so a noisy house should not be a problem?….I can isolate myself from that and not bother anyone...….that would make it all worth while.....for me....with the camera set up...you need a quiet space....

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Vinnie View Post
    Well, first of all I'm still using my flip phone from 2007, so that rules out smartphone video.

    Frank, it's not my place to ask how much you have invested in equipment to record your videos, but I can tell it's more than I want to spend.

    I guess you guys will just have to come see me live.
    Vinnie, smart phones often get bogged down after several years and people replace them... I'd guess most people you know have an old smart phone laying around and not being used. See if someone will give you one, just use the video and camera function on an old smart phone. I use my old smart phone as a video camera (it's a Samsung Galaxy S4 and takes surprisingly high quality videos).
    B+
    Frank (aka fep)

  15. #14

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    My Fender M-80 Chorus amp has an output for headphones which I use when I practice at night. Could I plug that directly into a recording device?

    I'm thinking it's analogue; if so would I need a device to convert it to digital?

  16. #15

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    This was recorded with a Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 interface (about $150 US new. Probably about $80 or $90 used), my basic laptop with Audacity for sound (free) and an old version of Microsoft MovieMaker for the video (also free). The guitar is running direct into the interface, so there's no mics or add-on hardware. At a basic level none of it is very hard to use. The video can come from a phone, a web-cam or even an older point-and-shoot camera that you can buy used for $30 or $40 (I used a cheap point-and-shoot Canon for all my videos for about 7 years).

    My CD "Bare Handed" is available as a download at Bandcamp.com
    http://jimsoloway.bandcamp.com/album/bare-handed

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Vinnie View Post
    My Fender M-80 Chorus amp has an output for headphones which I use when I practice at night. Could I plug that directly into a recording device?

    I'm thinking it's analogue; if so would I need a device to convert it to digital?
    depends on the recording device, what inputs does it have. I can plug my guitar or my amp line out into my Korg recorder, it only has analogue inputs.

  18. #17

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    Here I use a videocamera for the video (or smartphone) and a Panasonic L-5 recorder for the sound. I use VideoPad Video editor to put video and the better sound from the Panasonic together.
    You can see the Panasonic recorder lying on the table in front of the amp.



    Hans

  19. #18

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    Local access cable TV stations are always looking for on-air talent. If there is a music show produced in your area, you can book a spot or even an entire show, and they can burn you a DVD generally for free or a few bucks. Definitely the way to go for groups or acts that have it together, although some stations will only be able to utilize original music because of copyright limitations.

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by ronjazz View Post
    Local access cable TV stations are always looking for on-air talent. If there is a music show produced in your area, you can book a spot or even an entire show, and they can burn you a DVD generally for free or a few bucks. Definitely the way to go for groups or acts that have it together, although some stations will only be able to utilize original music because of copyright limitations.
    I think that is a completely different level of humiliation than what Uncle Vinnie was considering.

  21. #20

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    Jim, your not using headphones as you play so are you using monitors?

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Vinnie View Post
    I've decided to humiliate myself beyond my room.

    What equipment do you guys (and gals) use to make a video to post on youtube?

    What's an inexpensive way to get a good sound?

    I'm totally new at this. All suggestions are welcome.
    It would help to know more about your objectives. How important is quality of the video and quality of the audio? How important is it to be quick and easy? What’s your cost constraint?
    For quick and dirty samples of my playing I’ll usually record using a decent smart phone or tablet. If I want a little better quality I’ll use a good digital camera. But if they were demos for gigs or to sell an instrument I’d want better audio quality.

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by artcore View Post
    Jim, your not using headphones as you play so are you using monitors?
    Yes. I plugged a small Bose Bluetooth speaker into the headphone output jack on the interface. It also meant that the video had enough sound on it for me to sync the track.
    My CD "Bare Handed" is available as a download at Bandcamp.com
    http://jimsoloway.bandcamp.com/album/bare-handed