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  1. #1

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    I've tried line-outs. The Mesa Mark V 35 has "Cab Clone" open back, closed back, and vintage modes available for it's three-prong mic jack. But a real mic sounds better to me when I compare them (contrary to what the manufacturer may have you believe).

    What is your favorite speaker mic for low to mid volume jazz guitar recording? What brand, type (condenser, ribbon) and why please.

    I have an old discontinued Audio-Technica ATM31 cardioid-condenser which sounds better than my line-outs. Not necessarily my favorite mic (I don't know enough about mics to have a favorite), it's just what happen to have. Thanks


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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    i have two mics I use a lot on my recordings - a Sterling Audio ST-51 cardioid condenser, because it has the clearest midrange of any inexpensive condenser mic ($50 at a hockshop) that I've ever used as well as a very clear high end, and an Audix I5 dynamic, which is to my ears tons better and smoother than the ubiquitous Shure Sm-57. And since I just happen to have it an Avantone CR-14 ribbon mic - nice sound but it's a bit too restrained.
    Last edited by robertm2000; 12-30-2016 at 11:34 PM.

  4. #3

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    I have a few old Shure SM58's that work good enough to not consider replacing them.

    PS. I see them oftem in pawn shops for under $50
    Last edited by GNAPPI; 12-31-2016 at 05:35 AM.

  5. #4

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    For recording with just one mic i favor a Sennheiser MD441 because it's very smooth and well balanced with a frequency range close to a condenser.

    If i record with two mics i'd typically use a Royer R101 (i bought this because i didn't want to spend the extra money for a R121 which would be even better) and a condenser. Depending on the guitar i'm recording this would be a Rode NT2a, a modded Rode NT2 (RK-47 capsule) or a Sure SM81. The Royer produces a mellow sound which i spice up with a small amount of the condenser sound for additional punch.

    Mic placement is crucial for achieving good sound. Whether it's aiming to the side or to the center of the speaker makes a huge difference, also the distance from the speaker does. I find that it is very beneficial to really take my time to experiment with different placements. If the mic is placed properly equalizing can be reduced to a minimum or even omitted.

  6. #5

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    The SM-57 is hard to beat.

    Really!

  7. #6

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    Jazznote, could you elaborate on mic placement please?

    "Mic placement is crucial for achieving good sound. Whether it's aiming to the side or to the center of the speaker makes a huge difference, also the distance from the speaker does. I find that it is very beneficial to really take my time to experiment with different placements. If the mic is placed properly equalizing can be reduced to a minimum or even omitted."


    I have just started recording with a Zoom H. I have tried it positioned close to the amp, speaker centre (very clear and detailed recording) and also to the speaker edge (similar but warmer sounding). I am hearing a much fuller sound in the room and would like to get closer to that,?

  8. #7

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    andyb: you can find clips on youtube about the topic which explain much better than i could do. A good one is this:
    watch from 2:26

    He seems to favor SM57 and AKG 114 but basically the same applies to most microphones. In my experience it's not really necessary to pad the condenser as he says, this really depends on the individual mic.


    Just take this video as a start and experiment (record and listen back) to different positions, distances and angles. However, i'm not sure if this works the same way with a zoom, as it contains probably more than one mic which probably compromises the directionality. If you want more of the sound in the room, which also contains some acoustic sound of the guitar you will need an additional room mic to be able to blend this in.

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by JazzNote
    For recording with just one mic i favor a Sennheiser MD441 because it's very smooth and well balanced with a frequency range close to a condenser.
    If i record with two mics i'd typically use a Royer R101 (i bought this because i didn't want to spend the extra money for a R121 which would be even better) and a condenser.

    I heard a recording done with a Royer 121 which I liked, and then I looked at the price: $1295 !


  10. #9

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    It depends on what you're going after in terms of sound and costs. I ribbon is a favorite. It mellows the transients. Great for jazz and loud distorted guitar where you want a smoother vibe. I have and love the AEA 84r, Royer 121, Peluso TR-14 tube ribbon, and R-14. If you can get your hands on an old RCA 87 or 44, do it, but it's likely to be very expensive and need a lot of mic preamp power to drive. And way overkill for just guitar.

    The standard goto is the Shure SM57. In some ways I think it's because it's a workhorse dynamic mic, which means it can take a licking and keep on beating. Loud sources OK without a lot of bleed. But it's not smooth.

    Dynamics are good in general. 421 is great. RE-20 but a little dark.

    Condensors are good unless you're recording other instruments at the same time in the same room. Make sure it has various polar patterns you can experiment with. They tend to be expensive. I'd stay away from some of the cheaper ones. Good condensers are hard to do cheap. They tend to sound brittle and toneless. I like the Audio Technica 4050. It's a workhorse. AT's less expensive answer to the AKG 414. I think you'd have to find them used. It can be a tad brittle, but that's more a characteristic of their mics. Not bad brittle. I recorded a pair of 4050s on acoustic pianos for years. Big Steinway and Kawai concert grands. Beautiful. Neumann U87 tends to be the standard here. Peluso makes great copies of the U47 (my favorite all time) and AKG 414. Overkill though.
    Last edited by henryrobinett; 12-31-2016 at 05:43 PM.

  11. #10

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    An interesting, and affordable, mic is the Behringer ecm8000. It's a condenser microphone designed to be a measurement, or reference, mic. similar to the Earthworks TC30. The Earthworks runs about $770 while the Behringer is about $60.

    These mics are nice when multi-mic'ing or when mic'ing an acoustic instrument to add some neutral/uncolored sound to the mix.

  12. #11

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    Friends don't let friends buy Behringer.


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  13. #12

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    Hopefully in a few days I'll be saying that a Sennheiser 421 is my favourite.

  14. #13

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    Just got a Sennheiser e609 Silver. This is a super cardoid dynamic mic. What really make it easy to use is it is designed to hang from the cable lying against the speaker cab. No need for a mic stand. I hope to post some examples using it (and my new Tascam DP-03SD) in a couple days.
    Favorite Mic For Recording In Front Of a Speaker?-img_0765-jpg
    Last edited by Alder Statesman; 12-31-2016 at 10:51 PM.

  15. #14

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  16. #15

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    I've been using a Rode NT2 for about 20 years. A few years ago i found the sound brighter than what i desired and modded it with a K-47 capsule. The sound has improved tremendously, getting close to what one hears from a Neumann. Replacement capsules exist for quite a few of the low budget microphones. This is a great way to acquire a great sounding condenser mic for reasonable money.

  17. #16

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    I have to revive this thread, because I have found the beyer m88 to sound smooth and delicious on my princeton reverb... so smooth and warm
    I haven't bought a ribbon because a good one is expensive, and i don't have a great room, but the m88 is just great, would love to have an md-441 also

  18. #17

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    That’d be a great mic. I love ribbons. I have a bunch. The Peluso’s are great too. The R-14 and the TR-14. I love the AEAr84 on guitar fans as well as the Royer 121. Don’t have the Beyer but I understand it’s very good.


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  19. #18

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    I've found Neumann Tlm67 to be an amazingly smooth microphone due to its flat freq response. Better than U-87ai for jazz guitar. A very versatile mic.

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  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alder Statesman
    Just got a Sennheiser e609 Silver. This is a super cardoid dynamic mic. What really make it easy to use is it is designed to hang from the cable lying against the speaker cab. No need for a mic stand. I hope to post some examples using it (and my new Tascam DP-03SD) in a couple days.
    Favorite Mic For Recording In Front Of a Speaker?-img_0765-jpg
    I have the 906 and it's quite good, but it's got a much more modern sound, great for fusion type stuff, and also super easy to get set up