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  1. #1

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    I use Sibelius, but the publisher I work with uses Finale, and sometimes my files get corrupted when they convert them to Finale. So I'm contemplating splashing out for Finale.

    I understand it is excellent for guitar notation. But I would also like to do lute and guitar tab. Specifically, I need to know if I can have rhythm signals just above the tab stave, without there being a treble clef stave?

    Any other comments comparing Sibelius and Finale welcome.

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  3. #2

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    Finale sucks and it always has.

    ok, I'm still a little bitter that they no longer support the version I bought 5 years ago. So number 1, if you want to use it in 5 years, find a different company.

    Seriously, I have always felt it was bloated and clumsy. Don't get me wrong, it has everything, 45% of which you'll never use. Personally I prefer a program that I can learn and enter music in less time than it takes to write a symphony.

    ive been using an iPad ap lately that's great. It's called notion.

  4. #3

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    Rob,

    Have you given MuseScore a try?

    I've been a Sibelius user but I only have a student license and no longer being a student I'd have to pull out my pocketbook to upgrade and put it on my current computer.

    So I'm now using MuseScore. Not as robust as Sibelius but pretty good. And, did I mention it was free.
    B+
    Frank (aka fep)

  5. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by vintagelove View Post
    Finale sucks and it always has.
    100% wrong. It's still the best and most comprehensive music notation software on the market. It can do anything. Sibelius is easier to use if you're a beginner but when you're an experienced user, it loses traction. Finale can do what the OP asked about.

  6. #5

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    There it is with the bestest again. I prefer Sibelius. Lol.

  7. #6

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    I've only used Sibelius but all the professional composers and arrangers I've met seem to use Finale.

  8. #7

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    I used both at one point, and always hated Finale. Finale is a poor man' Sibelius. No one can pay me enough money to use it again ahaha. IMO etc.

  9. #8

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    None of them is perfect. From what I've gathered, if you start getting used to one of them, you'll probably hate the other one. Me, I'm used to Finale and after trying out Sibelius, I decided to stay with Finale. I am sure that someone used to Sibelius would stay with it if they were in a similar situation and tried Finale.

    I think a good way to decide between Finale and Sibelius is to first check which one your friends and collaborators use, and get the same one. I am not talking for sharing PDFs, but the files in the proprietary format. If some use F and other use S, just go with the one your most frequent collaborators use. If you only share PDFs, try them both and go for the one you prefer. They're both good (and also frustrating at times), and they both are the standard programs.

    One thing I hate is that we all must have not only the same software but also the same version if we share scores back and forth. (Newer versions open files saved with older versions, but not the other way around, so it it means that people in our circle have to update to the same versions -- we usually go every two years.)

    I don't know if Sibelius offer the same thing, they probably do, but I am glad that Finale offer a substancial discount for educators.
    Richard

  10. #9

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    I work in both Finale and Sibelius. I teach Sibelius at MI and I am a copyist for various orchestrators that all use Finale.
    There's no use bagging on either software. Both are excellent but they are different and each have their strengths and weaknesses.
    Sibelius is easier to use for a novice or intermediate user. That doesn't mean it can't be used professionally. I know a lot of professional composers who use it and it is by far the most popular software taught in music schools.

    Finale is more flexible and in my opinion more powerful but is more work to master. Where Sibelius has many useful shortcuts and templates that make workflow easy, Finale allows you the freedom to build things from the ground up and in any way you want. This is great when you know how to use it but frustrating if you're trying to figure out how everything works.

    If you're good at Sibelius and you're happy with the program you may want to live with the occasional corrupt file when transferring over to Finale. If you have some free time on your hands and you want a challenge, then dive into Finale. It will only add to your skill set and make you more useful in the field.

    Good luck.

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by jzucker View Post
    100% wrong. It's still the best and most comprehensive music notation software on the market. It can do anything. Sibelius is easier to use if you're a beginner but when you're an experienced user, it loses traction. Finale can do what the OP asked about.

    Like i said, if you are willing to devote half a year to learning it because you really wanted to use that wacky font to notate the prepared ukulele part, great.

    Let me ask, exactly how many other composition programs have you used extensively enough to determine what is the "best"??? I've used several, as well as taking a class solely devoted to learning and using finale.

    How do we define best again? I think you're confusing facts and opinions.
    Last edited by vintagelove; 01-26-2016 at 02:42 AM.

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by setemupjoe View Post
    I work in both Finale and Sibelius. I teach Sibelius at MI and I am a copyist for various orchestrators that all use Finale.
    There's no use bagging on either software. Both are excellent but they are different and each have their strengths and weaknesses.
    Sibelius is easier to use for a novice or intermediate user. That doesn't mean it can't be used professionally. I know a lot of professional composers who use it and it is by far the most popular software taught in music schools.

    Finale is more flexible and in my opinion more powerful but is more work to master. Where Sibelius has many useful shortcuts and templates that make workflow easy, Finale allows you the freedom to build things from the ground up and in any way you want. This is great when you know how to use it but frustrating if you're trying to figure out how everything works.

    If you're good at Sibelius and you're happy with the program you may want to live with the occasional corrupt file when transferring over to Finale. If you have some free time on your hands and you want a challenge, then dive into Finale. It will only add to your skill set and make you more useful in the field.

    Good luck.
    Where were you when I needed you ten years ago hiking up the learning curve?

    Jokes aside, I have only used my now "legacy" Sibelius G7. Very much a beginner's model it nonetheless has done what I needed and rather well. I love working with Sibelius. I imagine newer versions of their "baby" model are probably even better now.

  13. #12

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    Thanks for all the comments. I have been persuaded that the transfer between Sibelius and Finale is not as fraught with danger as I imagined, with any changes being very minor. So, as I am familiar with Sibelius, having used it from the days it was only available on Acorn computers (remember them?) I'll stick with it.

  14. #13

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    I use Sibelius, not Finale. But I have written for orchestra, big band and various combos, music that is pretty complex. I haven't run into problems with it. I've taught in music schools in university and more than half of the students, many composition and arranging students also used Sibelius. Some teachers demanded they use Finale for compatibility.

    I think either program for anyone I know, professionals all, would be fine.

  15. #14

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    There might be a reason Berklee, Julliard, Metropolitan Opera, Jazz At Linclln Center, UNT and music publisher Hal Leonard use Finale, but maybe not....

  16. #15

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    Rob,
    Would you need the full Finale suite? Their "Print Music" package cost seems pretty reasonable. But, I suppose some of the instruments you play may require some exceptional notation functions.

    I use Musescore and it's very flexible. Anyone know the differences between MuseScore and Finale Print Music?
    Last edited by TheGrandWazoo; 01-26-2016 at 08:13 AM.
    Seeking beauty and truth through six strings.

  17. #16

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    My main concern, Chris, was the importation of Sibelius files into Finale. In the old days it threw up a lot of issues. However, I've been persuaded that it is MUCH better now. In that case I have decided to stick with Sibelius - I know it well.

    Cheers, everyone, and thanks for your comments.

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo View Post
    There might be a reason Berklee, Julliard, Metropolitan Opera, Jazz At Linclln Center, UNT and music publisher Hal Leonard use Finale, but maybe not....
    Because Finale was the first serious program. And they sent them licenses and contracts. They made a deal.

  19. #18

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    I use Sibelius First last version.
    It is very nice music notation software and easy to use.
    I/ve used Finale few years ago...but it was really complicated/I mean old version/.
    I think nowdays Sibelius 8 and Finale 2016 are very professional softwares.
    Best
    Kris

  20. #19

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    I started with Sibelius, found it very good, especially for legit music (classical, broadway scores, etc.), but once Finale flattened its learning curve, found that to be more flexible and more universal. The latest versions are really quite easy and also come with Garritan instruments, which are very cool.

  21. #20

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    I use Finale PrintMusic (i.e. the middle-level version not full pro version). One thing I've found is that it really pays to study the help/manual etc. and make a list of all the keyboard shortcuts and commands which look useful. These commands can save a lot of time compared to using the mouse for everything.

  22. #21

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    I use Forte, a German company that someone posted a link to in this forum. It was free, so I gave it a whirl.

    The learning curve was steep for the first week, but after that, it was a breeze. I only use it for copying out parts for big band arrangements i write in pencil.

    I'm supposed to be copying out the 1st tenor part now, so I'm gone.

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by ronjazz View Post
    I started with Sibelius, found it very good, especially for legit music (classical, broadway scores, etc.), but once Finale flattened its learning curve, found that to be more flexible and more universal. The latest versions are really quite easy and also come with Garritan instruments, which are very cool.
    Ron, do you remember roughly when Finale flattened its learning curve? My last install was Finale2012c, and I stopped using the program in 2013 IIRC. I am very curious to know about this. Was it significantly due to a reengineering of Finale, or mostly due to the acquisition of experience on your part. -- Thanks.
    Find your passion and be hardcore about it.
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