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  1. #1

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    Hello,

    I'm sure this has been asked but a quick search came up short. What do folks use to create chord and scale block sheets? I have pdf's of the blank sheets but I want to type scale degrees onto them. I do not want to hand write them.

    thanks!

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    I don't have anything for that. It would be nice (provided it was free or cheap.;o) I use graph paper to make my own charts. They're not pretty to look at it but I make 'em easy for these aging eyes to read from a music stand....
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  4. #3

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    Try Neck Diagrams. Not free (or even cheap?) but it's a well-designed piece of software with an array of templates:

    Chord chart and fretboard diagram software for guitar, bass, banjo, ukulele and ANY fretted instrument | Neckdiagrams.com

  5. #4

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  6. #5

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    I downloaded the free demo of Neck Diagrams. Thanks, PMB and Henry!
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  7. #6

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    I use Neck Diagrams too. Very nice diagram can be created for scales and arpeggios for a given piece, if one pays attention to use all the available features of the tool (fretboard colors, note marking with intervals, mark shapes, etc ..).

    The underlying implementation makes it a bit slow and heavy to use if a page contains many diagrams. A version 2 coming soon is said to fix most of the current constraints.
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    Last edited by mhch; 08-21-2014 at 07:48 AM.

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by mhch View Post
    The underlying implementation makes it a bit slow and heavy to use if a page contains many diagrams. A version 2 coming soon is said to fix most of the current constraints.
    That raises a question: should one wait until version 2 comes out before buying the software? (Not sure that I will, but if something better is "just around the corner," why buy now?)
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  9. #8

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    If you use that philosophy you'd never buy anything. Something better is ALWAYS around the corner in regards technology. And upgrades are often free or cheap.

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by henryrobinett View Post
    If you use that philosophy you'd never buy anything. Something better is ALWAYS around the corner in regards technology. And upgrades are often free or cheap.
    I don't think so. I have never bought this and am thinking about it and I just hear that a new edition is nigh that deals with problems in the earlier one. Waiting seems prudent here. (One can't always wait, but this is far from an essential / pressing purchase.)
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  11. #10

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    I use Adobe InDesign for doing diagrams as well as final layout of books and articles.
    Pete Martin - just a mandolin guy but loves jazz guitar
    www.PetimarPress.com
    Www.Jazz-Mandolin.com
    Pete Plays Wes free download
    www.jazz-mandolin.com/PetePlaysWes.xht

  12. #11

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    I have a drummer friend who wanted to buy a drum machine years ago. He kept waiting for the newest and the best, the latest upgraded models. He never bought one. In the mean tine he lost out on jumping into the technology. I'm not saying that's the case, but I've never allowed that to be an excuse not to buy something. Technology moves ahead at an alarming rate. Waiting, unless you are waiting for a specific product you KNOW is being released and you KNOW is not vapor ware, is generally a waste of time. Chord diagram software is not deep technology. I don't know how you'd gain by waiting for some other thing. But I could be wrong.

    Someone else l know was waiting for a certain upgrade converter box he only dreamed about. He thought he'd wait until the developer realized the error of his ways and decided to design this dream box. I told the guy much as I'm telling you. This exists now. Get it or don't get it,but don't wait for something that doesn't exist because of hope alone.

    My two.

  13. #12

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    I use QwickChords, not bad, around $,

    Cheers

  14. #13
    Neck diagrams looks great and worth checking out. I cannot seem to find anything else that offers that same. thanks

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by henryrobinett View Post
    I have a drummer friend who wanted to buy a drum machine years ago. He kept waiting for the newest and the best, the latest upgraded models. He never bought one. In the mean tine he lost out on jumping into the technology. I'm not saying that's the case, but I've never allowed that to be an excuse not to buy something. Technology moves ahead at an alarming rate. Waiting, unless you are waiting for a specific product you KNOW is being released and you KNOW is not vapor ware, is generally a waste of time. Chord diagram software is not deep technology. I don't know how you'd gain by waiting for some other thing. But I could be wrong.

    Someone else l know was waiting for a certain upgrade converter box he only dreamed about. He thought he'd wait until the developer realized the error of his ways and decided to design this dream box. I told the guy much as I'm telling you. This exists now. Get it or don't get it,but don't wait for something that doesn't exist because of hope alone.

    My two.
    I get your point, Henry. But this is technology that I don't have to have. I'm not even aching for it. I use graph paper and a pencil and that works fine. The results ain't pretty to look at, but they work fine. I'm not missing out on anything by not having this----nothing that relates to playing, anyway. Waiting isn't costing me anything important.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  16. #15

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    Sure Mark. Do you do a lot of teaching? I had always zeroxed copies of my chicken scratching lessons filed away or PDFed. But they never looked professional. I can now file and store all of these lessons in a great format. If you don't teach much it's certainly not an important thing to have.
    Last edited by henryrobinett; 08-25-2014 at 05:29 PM. Reason: typos

  17. #16

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    Okay, Henry, you talked me into it. I'm getting it. I checked the demo vids / tutorials and it does a lot of things that would help me. In a month I'll probably wonder how I ever got along without it! Thanks for the needed nudge! ;o)
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  18. #17

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  19. #18

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    I bought net diagrams two days ago. I'm already finding very useful in my teaching practice.

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop View Post
    I bought net diagrams two days ago. I'm already finding very useful in my teaching practice.
    Is "net diagrams" another program, or did you mean to type "Neck Diagrams"? (I Googled 'net diagrams' and nothing guitar-related came up....)
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  21. #20

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    I don't use software, I use stamps! Software is nice for writing material on it's own page, but stamps are great for adding chord/scale blocks to pre-existing music.

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    Is "net diagrams" another program, or did you mean to type "Neck Diagrams"? (I Googled 'net diagrams' and nothing guitar-related came up....)
    Soory, Mark, I meant Neck.

  23. #22

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  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop View Post
    Soory, Mark, I meant Neck.
    I thought you might but I wasn't sure. There is sooooo much stuff out there....
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  25. #24
    I came up with a a cheap quick solution for this....for now. I wanted to create my own scale/arp map sheets like in the book "Jazz Guitar Soloing" by Joe Elliot. I really love that book but the images are a little small. I also have to still write out all the positions - not in the book.

    The quick and dirty way is using MS Visio. If you have access to that program it works great and I'm sure there is a free alternative. You can just use a screenshot program like Snagit, Greenshot (free), or PrintScreen/MSPaint to grab a scale/chord/fretboard image (from pdfs online) you like and paste it into Visio. From there you can drag, re-size, add text etc. I plan to just write in by hand. In 5 min I created these 3 sheets to use for the Joe Elliot material.

    1. Major scale at top plus 7 diatonic arps within that position
    2. Major scale at top plus 2-5-1 arps within that position
    3. Major scale at top plus 2-5-1 arps within that position, plus extras below for subs

    Cheers
    Attached Images Attached Images

  26. #25

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    J-mo, I don't know if anyone else is experiencing this, but when I open your files on my iPad, I get blank grid boxes.

  27. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by snoskier63 View Post
    I don't use software, I use stamps! Software is nice for writing material on it's own page, but stamps are great for adding chord/scale blocks to pre-existing music.
    You mean rubber stamps? I had one of those with, inkpad to boot, and it would make a fretboard grid but the stamp I had was too small for my current needs. (Though it was cool for adding a grid to a chart and indicating a handy chord grip.)
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  28. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by j-mo View Post
    I came up with a a cheap quick solution for this....for now. I wanted to create my own scale/arp map sheets like in the book "Jazz Guitar Soloing" by Joe Elliot. I really love that book but the images are a little small. I also have to still write out all the positions - not in the book.
    Neat. Thanks. I have that book too.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  29. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop View Post
    J-mo, I don't know if anyone else is experiencing this, but when I open your files on my iPad, I get blank grid boxes.
    Me too on MacG4

  30. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop View Post
    J-mo, I don't know if anyone else is experiencing this, but when I open your files on my iPad, I get blank grid boxes.
    That is to be expected, I attached blank ones. Its a bit of a stretch from the original thread, but it still utilizes software to create grids. Someone replied that they just write notes/intervals in by hand and this a quick way to create and customize blank grids.
    I suspect I could use a program along with these blank pages to input interval/note names. Maybe that'll be next

  31. #30

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    Can't resist since I've been using Neck Diagrams extensively along with Joe Elliot's book, in which I also found the diagrams hard to read for my also aging eyes !! In addition, it's nice to have the intervals clearly marked on the notes for each arp, from educative and error checking points of view.

    I also found that creating those diagrams was a very good learning exercise, including those which aren't written out in the book. Very much like transcribing is a recommended learning exercise. Put another way, it's good to ask guitar students to write out their own scale and arp diagrams.

    I guess publishing all those ND created diagrams might be violating some copyrights, sorry.
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    Last edited by mhch; 08-27-2014 at 02:13 AM.

  32. #31

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    Can Neck Diagrams also do just black and white diagrams?
    I'm not sure why but I find the colors annoying.

  33. #32

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    Yes. No problem. I think I prefer b&w as well.

  34. #33

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    The reason I use colours is that it helps to format the document and make them easier to grab from remote when practicing (aging yes ), I use B & W for scales except root notes, chords, and a yellow background for the arps, notes being B & W.

    I rarely use ND for chords, as I prefer them appearing along bars, i.e. either on top of a staff, or using Excel to create lead sheets (each Excel cell or grouped cells = one bar)

  35. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by mhch View Post
    Can't resist since I've been using Neck Diagrams extensively along with Joe Elliot's book, in which I also found the diagrams hard to read for my also aging eyes !! In addition, it's nice to have the intervals clearly marked on the notes for each arp, from educative and error checking points of view.

    I also found that creating those diagrams was a very good learning exercise, including those which aren't written out in the book. Very much like transcribing is a recommended learning exercise. Put another way, it's good to ask guitar students to write out their own scale and arp diagrams.
    Good stuff, thanks. As for aging eyes, I have realized an advantage to reading music that didn't occur to me when young: tab gets hard to read as you age! "Is that a 2 or a 7? A 5 or a 3? An 8? Geez!"
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  36. #35

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    An example: 5 positions of the Pentatonic Minor in A. Here I've reduced everything to black and white, save for the Roots which are in red. I've chosen for the intervals to appear in the dots - I could have chosen note names or fingering. The note names appear below the fretboard - this is optional. I could reduce or enlarge any of the text, including fret numbers.

    Software for creating chord/scale blocks-5pentminors-png


    Thoughts?

  37. #36

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    Looks great, and I didn't realize note names could be made to appear on the diagrams. Thanks for sharing.

    My only reservation is about the fret dots which I personally don't like to see on these diagrams. But that's just a question of taste !

    One more evidence that forums are great to expand one's experience !

  38. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by mhch View Post
    My only reservation is about the fret dots which I personally don't like to see on these diagrams.
    Your wish is my command!

    Software for creating chord/scale blocks-screen-shot-2014-08-29-07-38-11-png

    I think it looks better without the fret markers. All it takes is to untick a box.

  39. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop View Post
    Your wish is my command!
    That's verrrry kind of you (My partner in life here in France is Scottish, from Glasgow)

    I prefer to have scale and arpeggio patterns on the neck represented without fret markers (and notes , as I prefer to think intervals rather than notes), so it better reflects the fact that they can be translated along the neck. Again question of taste.

  40. #39

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  41. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop View Post
    Do it yourself this time
    Of courrse, wasn't expecting any extrrra worrrk frrrom you .. Just exprrressed a few thoughts. Thanks again.

  42. #41

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    That's neat that the fret markers can be used or removed, whichever one prefers.

    I wonder about the note names: why p5 and p4? I think 5 and 4 would be understood as perfect unless otherwise indicated. That's not a big deal----certainly no deal breaker---but I wonder why they did it that way.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  43. #42

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    Maybe you can change that too. I'm not at home right now, but will report back.

  44. #43

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    No way to define how intervals are annotated. I had the exact same complaint.

    One can define custom annotation for each note, but this is plain user defined text to be defined for each note while interval text is created automatically, so it's a bit of a bother to do so just to change the way intervals are written.

    It seems to me that the request to define how intervals are written has been made in the Neck Diagram Forum (interesting to visit from the ND web page). And it seems to me that the reply was "it will be part of the many improvements in version 2". So keep faith. Version 2 is said to appear before end of year.

  45. #44

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    Maybe a silly question, but why is pattern V beginning with the b7 on frets 14-17 rather than 2-5? I can see that the pattern beginning with the root is I and that beginning with the b7 is V, and they are simply sequentially presented, but on many guitars the 17th fret isn't very accessible, and in jazz I would expect pattern V to be much more commonly used from frets 2-5. How many frets will the Pgm utilize before displaying the scale patterns non-sequentially? 20?, 22? And can that option be controlled?

  46. #45

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    It can be controlled, and I could easily have set it at 2-5. So could you if you buy it and do your own

    I will be using these in my teaching, and will of course explain the option.

  47. #46

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    Question, guys: Who asked if it would be possible for this site to have 'bank' for such charts, so they could be uploaded and each member would be spared the trouble of making each chart on his own?

    I think it was Rob, but scrolling back, I don't see that post here. Anyway, I asked the administrator about this and the question came back, "In what kind of form do you see such a bank?"

    If you have an idea for this, please pipe up now! (If you think someone you know who is not participating in this thread but has thoughts on the subject, please alert him. Or her. Thanks.)
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  48. #47

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    It was indeed Rob, but I can't remember where either

    It just struck me that most people who purchase Neck Diagrams would be teachers or students with similar interests. So, for example, we would all be writing out our own five positions of the Pentatonic minor scale. It would be good to have a part of this website (though it could equally be done elsewhere) dedicated to these diagrams, and in printable form.

    So, there would be categories for Scales, another for Arpeggios, another for Chords. There could be alternative versions: some with the names of the notes in the dots, some with intervals, some with fingering. Over time, if enough people make enough contributions, it could become an online resource of all the scales, arpeggios and chords we use for jazz.

  49. #48

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    A few thoughts of mine about the "bank"

    - First of all, the Neck Diagram Forum offers a place to store and share diagrams. Up to the admin to decide whether they would prefer something more forum specific (a new section ?).

    - Diagrams can be shared as either the Neck Diagram format, so they can be modified, using ND, or just viewable/printable pdf files. Modifiable format might be prefered so each one can adjust the diagrams to its own taste (colors, fret markers, etc ..).

    - Copyright Issues ...


    Along this line, we might also consider to have a sticky thread in the software section, in order to have a quick access to names and URLs to those software tools members are using and would like to recommend to others. Currently the information is scattered across the various discussions in that software section

  50. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop View Post
    It was indeed Rob, but I can't remember where either

    It just struck me that most people who purchase Neck Diagrams would be teachers or students with similar interests. So, for example, we would all be writing out our own five positions of the Pentatonic minor scale. It would be good to have a part of this website (though it could equally be done elsewhere) dedicated to these diagrams, and in printable form.

    So, there would be categories for Scales, another for Arpeggios, another for Chords. There could be alternative versions: some with the names of the notes in the dots, some with intervals, some with fingering. Over time, if enough people make enough contributions, it could become an online resource of all the scales, arpeggios and chords we use for jazz.
    That makes sense. That's from our end----how we would think of it and what we would do with it. But from the administrative side, would this be, say:
    ---a band of files we uploaded into a dedicated folder as pdfs?
    ---a thread, say, "Neck Diagram pdfs" where people posted what they had done?
    ---or something else?
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  51. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by mhch View Post
    A few thoughts of mine about the "bank"
    Good stuff. Thanks. I'll alert the administrator to this post (and Rob's and any others that come in soon) and then we'll see how it looks to him. I'm not sure that he has Neck Diagrams, so I'll include a link for the trial download and website.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola