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  1. #1

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    I just had to post because I'm so pleased with Transcribe! software.
    http://www.seventhstring.com/xscribe/overview.html
    (no affiliation, obviously) I'd been using a half-decent iphone app (iLift), but the precision, flexibility, and sound quality of Transcribe is leagues ahead. I know tons of people recommend Transcribe, but I'd been resisting because (1) it's $40 for a rather old piece of software, and (2) I was trying to keep the laptop out of my practice space to cut down on distractions.

    I've been struggling with some Clifford Brown licks. Between the tempo and the unfamiliar sonority, I had to do a lot of guessing. I installed the trial of Transcribe this morning, and got through eight bars of bebop in the time it had been taking me to get a few beats. The real strength is that I can zone in on just a few notes, and loop it slowly with very high sound quality, until I can sing it. The iphone app I was using didn't get as slow, or sound as good, and it was hard to home in on such a small range.

    Anyway, one more happy customer. The $40 will be well spent for me.
    Last edited by dingusmingus; 07-25-2014 at 12:29 PM. Reason: added link

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Transcribe is a VERY essential software to learn how to play jazz because it allows you to focus on the parts rather than just the whole. You can highlight one beat, one measure, or an entire section. Whatever area you need to zoom in on. It doesn't get any better than transcibe! for play back, looping, and many other things.

  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by dingusmingus
    I just had to post because I'm so pleased with Transcribe! software.
    Transcribe! - software to help transcribe recorded music
    (no affiliation, obviously) I'd been using a half-decent iphone app (iLift), but the precision, flexibility, and sound quality of Transcribe is leagues ahead. I know tons of people recommend Transcribe, but I'd been resisting because (1) it's $40 for a rather old piece of software.
    Well, it's "old" in the sense it's been around for years, but there are regular updates (free once you register).
    And of course - as you will know, but others may not - you don't have to pay the $40 right away. The "demo" is the whole program, so that first month is plenty of time to fully test it out.

    Between you and me - hehe - when I first got it, countless years ago, the message reminding you to register could just be clicked away, and I managed to keep it using it free for two months... (they've probably plugged that loophole now)... but then I realised it was so good, they damn well deserved the fee. I can honestly say it's the best program I've ever used, of any kind. The early versions were totally transparent, no superfluous bells and whistles, intuitive interface. A few extras have been added over the years, of course, which I have no use for, but they don't get in the way or slow things down.

    Do you know it also works with video? Only with MOV or MP4, unfortunately (meaning youtubes need to be converted), but - being a guitarist - I've occasionally found it useful to watch fingers as well as listen.

  5. #4

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    A very good product, I've been using it for many, many years, but I prefer the pitch change facility with Song Surgeon. I have both products, pitch change on Song Surgeon is very accurate.

  6. #5

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    Geez, you guys make this sound like must-have stuff. Have you SEEN my list of must-have stuff? Endless, that's what it is! But I must add this....

  7. #6

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    Well, being a Transcribe! addict, I have to chime too ...

    I've been using it for years. Among its outstanding features

    - The ability to slow down a selection by 20x still keeping a reasonable sound.

    - Play a video in sync with any selection even short. Useful not only for the fingering but sometimes to be sure of the played notes.

    The GUI could be improved a bit, specially replacing the slider used to navigate the music window by a mouse click, hold and drag. I should rather say navigate the music the same way as you do so in your notation program. I'm often confused in between using Sibelius to write music, it uses this click drag technique, and Transcribe! which uses the slider.

    On the Transcribe! web site, it is written that Pat Metheny is an user ...

  8. #7

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    How dies it compare with Amazing Slow Downer?

  9. #8

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    Well, it can't be must have, because the old guys used to just use a record player. Dwayne Alman apparently used his toe to to reset the record arm!

    My ears are slow, if improving slowly, so I sure appreciate the help. I try to do a phrase at a time, and sing along, until I'm pretty sure I have the notes, before I go to the guitar to double check.

    Anyway, if you're gonna use some software, this is good stuff!

    Henry: I've never used the Amazing Slowdowner. I understand they're comparable. If you're already familiar with that, I doubt there's a reason to switch. I was comparing it to an inferior program, so I was pleased with the difference.
    Last edited by dingusmingus; 07-25-2014 at 03:10 PM. Reason: adresss Henry's question

  10. #9

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    I've sung the praises of Transcribe many a time on this forum. And in my estimation it's a must have...who in their right mind would go back to lifting tunes off records again?

    As to converting youtube files, aka flv files, to mp4 video files, that takes all of 10 seconds via countless free downloaders on the net.

    I use 'download helper'. It attaches to the Firefox browser. So, ANY website video that's playing back flash video's on your computer, youtube, etc., can be easily downloaded and saved onto your computer or alternate drive. Download types, including HQ mp4, are countless and many. The software has a conversion option, allowing you to download and convert flv. to mp4, automatically.

    https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/fir...ownloadhelper/

    If you have a MAC, and why wouldn't you , then I'd highly recommend the flv crunch for conversion of all video file types....namely because it doesn't attach spying software onto your computer.

    http://download.cnet.com/Flv-Crunch/...-10909295.html


    Don't pay for a downloader...




    Last edited by 2bornot2bop; 07-25-2014 at 04:34 PM.

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by dingusmingus
    Well, it can't be must have, because the old guys used to just use a record player. Dwayne Alman apparently used his toe to to reset the record arm!

    My ears are slow, if improving slowly, so I sure appreciate the help. I try to do a phrase at a time, and sing along, until I'm pretty sure I have the notes, before I go to the guitar to double check.

    Anyway, if you're gonna use some software, this is good stuff!

    Henry: I've never used the Amazing Slowdowner. I understand they're comparable. If you're already familiar with that, I doubt there's a reason to switch. I was comparing it to an inferior program, so I was pleased with the difference.
    I used Amazing Slowdowner ("ASD") for a couple years before switching to Transcribe. I would say Transcribe is much, much better...easier to hone-in on what you are looping; easy to add tags ("end of Fmin phrase and anticipation of next chord begins etc"), EQ-ing can be useful sometimes, and there's a free trial so why not give it a try? I still have ASD on my iPhone but I haven't used it in ages. Perhaps because I never listen to music from my iPhone (I use a Fiio X3 which is far superior as a music player) so I don't have my current 'tunes to learn' on there.

    But more importantly, it is Duane Allman...not Dwayne Alman! I had to correct that. He was my entry point into jazz (Kind of Blue was his favorite album for the year prior to his death).
    Last edited by coolvinny; 07-25-2014 at 05:57 PM.

  12. #11

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    Why is it better than ASD?

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by coolvinny
    But more importantly, it is Duane Allman...not Dwayne Alman! I had to correct that. He was my entry point into jazz (Kind of Blue was his favorite album for the year prior to his death).
    Thanks Vinny!
    Last edited by dingusmingus; 07-25-2014 at 05:17 PM.

  14. #13

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    I have had Transcribe for a few years now. I really enjoy it when I get the chance to use it.
    Lately I've been using Anytune + on the I-Pad. I love, love this program. It reminds me a lot of transcribe.

    https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/anytune-pro+-slow-downer-music/id478293637?mt=8

    Check it out. If you use an I-Pad more than a laptop, checkout Anytune.

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by henryrobinett
    Why is it better than ASD?
    You force me to be more explicit !!


    - Displays waveforms (mono or stereo) for the song
    - Can select any part of a waveform, whatever small
    - Can attach text notes anywhere to the waveform (chords, section name, whatever)
    - Can set markers on the waveform (section, bar, beat)
    - Can automatically add a specified number of divisions between set markers (ex: 4 between bar markers, or 3 between beat markers). Helpful to quickly identify rythms
    - Recognizes and displays notes on a piano keyboard (along with an indication of the probability the note is correct)
    - Suggests chord names for the notes belonging in a selection
    - Can create a MIDI piano roll for the song (note recognition for the whole song. Recognition algorithm different from the keyboard note recognition, that means double check)
    - Can play the song video in sync with any selection in the waveform, taking into account slowdown and pitch change
    - Can slowdown up to 5% (ASD = 20%)
    - Plenty of keyboard shortcuts
    - Can use with a pedal system to launch actions (eliminate mouse mouvements).

    And

    - Cheaper (plus one month free trial period)
    - Written by a jazz guitarist who created what he needed
    - Well maintained and supported.

  16. #15

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    Sounds cool. Except I don't like the chord names suggestion. I can take or leave the waveform, piano roll thing. I like asd though I don't really use it too much these days. I was asking because I just can't imagine any features I'd need beyond slowing down, setting and saving locate points.

    But thanks.

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by henryrobinett
    Why is it better than ASD?
    I like being able to add markers with notes and chord changes as well as save multiple loop selections and easily jump between them in transcribe. I've never used ASD so maybe you can do the same thing with that.

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzpunk
    I like being able to add markers with notes and chord changes as well as save multiple loop selections and easily jump between them in transcribe. I've never used ASD so maybe you can do the same thing with that.
    Yeah you can do that with asd.

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by dortmundjazzguitar
    plus you can use any foot controller to stop and start the loops. works even with a game contoller. making loops has been mentioned. the speed up by increments function is also very useful.

    Now that's cool. I don't know if you can do that with asd but I doubt it.

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by dingusmingus
    Well, it can't be must have, because the old guys used to just use a record player.
    Frank Vignola says he did this with Django records, slowed them down to 16 rpm (revolutions per minute.) Though this would drastically alter the pitch! I remember those "selector switches" on the record players of my youth. The options were 16, 33 (-an album), 45 (a single) and 78. My uncle Tommy had some old 78 rpm records, so I got to hear some of those. I never knew what the 16 was for----does anyone here??? Sometimes we kids would select 78 for records so that the voices would sound like Alvin and the Chipmunks. (I always thought this is how "Alvin" was discovered...)

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by dortmundjazzguitar
    plus you can use any foot controller to stop and start the loops. works even with a game contoller. making loops has been mentioned. the speed up by increments function is also very useful.
    Speeding up by increments would be very useful. When working with a metronome, you have to stop playing to raise the tempo. Worse, you (-or at least I) change hand positions doing so....

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by coolvinny
    But more importantly, it is Duane Allman...not Dwayne Alman! I had to correct that. He was my entry point into jazz (Kind of Blue was his favorite album for the year prior to his death).
    I was going to let that slide.... Ha, get it, "slide"? Duane Allman? I kill me....

    I loved Duane's playing. I still listen to "Mountain Jam" sometimes. (This was TWO sides of a double live album when it came out. In those dark days, one could put one record on a stereo and suspend another one above it, which would fall when the tone arm returned at the completion of the first one. We. Were. Amazed!)

    Duane did a lot of session work. Here's Duane on Wilson Pickett's version of "Hey Jude." (Shouldn't there be a comma there, as in "Hey, Jude..."?)

  23. #22

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    I have been using Transcribe for many, many years. I really think it is a great learning source and can highly recommend it.

    wiz

  24. #23

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    Transcribe is good, although I wouldn't go so far as to call it a "must-have" or "essential". Your ears are what is essential.

  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by henryrobinett
    Sounds cool. Except I don't like the chord names suggestion. I can take or leave the waveform, piano roll thing. I like asd though I don't really use it too much these days. I was asking because I just can't imagine any features I'd need beyond slowing down, setting and saving locate points.

    But thanks.

    I rarely use the chord suggestions for sure ! The only interest I can see is to come up quickly with all possible namings for a set of notes ...

    The waveform view not useful per se, but because it's the place to anchor text notes and markers. That's very useful to keep track of a song analysis.

    The piano roll view is not useful per se either, but because one can click on a MIDI note in it and hear the corresponding sound, while the current selection is being played. That's a good way to be sure the software - and you - identified the right notes (both are prone to errors, specially the software when the song contains percussion sounds or many instruments). I agree one can play a note on a music instrument to the same intent, but it's convenient to be able to do so when you work on a song without an instrument at hand (eg while on travel with a laptop).

    Also because when zoomed in, one can follow the displayed notes in the piano roll view and compare them to the corresponding sound as well as see note durations (sustained notes, anticipation, etc ...). Put another way, helps to analyse the details of how the music piece is played / interpreted.

    The video view is invaluable on certain occasions, specially analyze the fingering.

    Transcribe! author, a jazz guitarist, says that all Transcribe! features have been added because he needed them or because he's been asked for them by users.

  26. #25

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    It is an excellent example of practical software-I like the "chord guess" function in particular. Very useful for working on chord melody material e.g. pieces by Johnny Smith and similar players.

    gstarfire

  27. #26

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    I really detest software that tries to do your thinking for you.

    Like there's this songwriting software that generates melodies or chord sequences for you. WTF is the point??????
    Last edited by henryrobinett; 07-27-2014 at 09:50 AM.

  28. #27

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    I would'nt say Transcribe! thinks for me .. Just helps to analyze and do a few things quicker

  29. #28

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    No, I hear you. But I don't need a software program trying to guess what the chords are called. I'd rather do that myself. They have programs that will tell you the pitch. And pitch correction software will do that. Auto-tune or Melodyne. But you're not going to learn anything that way. I mean you you get the real ear-mental workout by using your ears. Like only knowing how to tune your guitar with an electronic tuner or doing math with a calculator. I use a calculator because my math sucks. But if I wanted to improve my math skills I'd put the calculator away.

    Those writing programs that generate progressions for you- I'm a composer. 90% of my tunes have progressions you couldn't guess. I mean that's half the fun and creativity. Coming up with music is coming up with the harmony and the melody all on my own. That's kind of what makes it my own. I'd rather not share writing credit with a computer programmer.

    End of rant!

  30. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    Speeding up by increments would be very useful. When working with a metronome, you have to stop playing to raise the tempo. Worse, you (-or at least I) change hand positions doing so....
    There is an app called 'Time Trainer' that does this on my iphone. I think that there are other metronome apps like this one available.

    I love the ASD app, and for my purposes I think it covers everything. I find it simple and friendly to use. The only thing I see listed above that might interest me is the chord identifier. And though I agree that it's best to discover these things yourself, there are times that this is very tough, if even possible.
    Last edited by srlank; 07-27-2014 at 01:52 PM.

  31. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Space Pickle
    Transcribe is good, although I wouldn't go so far as to call it a "must-have" or "essential". Your ears are what is essential.
    Goes without saying, IMO.
    It's a little like an astronomer saying a telescope is not essential, but your eyes are.... can't argue with that .

  32. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by srlank
    There is an app called 'Time Trainer' that does this on my iphone. I think that there are other metronome apps like this one available.

    I love the ASD app, and for my purposes I think it covers everything. I find it simple and friendly to use. The only thing I see listed above that might interest me is the chord identifier. And though I agree that it's best to discover these things yourself, there are times that this is very tough, if even possible.
    ...and the trouble with chord identifiers is they tend to get confused by the very same things that confuse your ears: dense textures, distortion, rogue frequencies and overtones, etc.
    With Transcribe, I very rarely find the chord identifier any use. Its first guess is always the best, the others hardly worth looking at, and maybe 1% of the time it causes me to listen again (is it right, or was I?), but otherwise I can identify the chords fine. When I really need its help it says "spectrum too messy, or out-of-tune notes". Yeah thanks, I know the feeling...
    In fact, there are times when it says that that I can find other clues to give me the answer.

  33. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    Frank Vignola says he did this with Django records, slowed them down to 16 rpm (revolutions per minute.) Though this would drastically alter the pitch! I remember those "selector switches" on the record players of my youth. The options were 16, 33 (-an album), 45 (a single) and 78. My uncle Tommy had some old 78 rpm records, so I got to hear some of those. I never knew what the 16 was for----does anyone here???
    Some spoken word recordings were at 16.
    The great thing about 16 was it was half (more or less) 33, so - for LPs - you'd get the track in the same key, just an octave lower.

    Not that I had to do that myself (back in the 1960s). My dad had a 2-speed reel-to-reel tape deck, so I could tape records to either slow them (half-speed octave down for lead licks or fingerstyle trickery), or speed them up (octave up to hear the bass, to help ID chords - or for entertaining chipmunk effects of course ). I saved a lot of vinyl that way... and learned stuff from the radio too...

  34. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by henryrobinett
    No, I hear you. But I don't need a software program trying to guess what the chords are called. I'd rather do that myself. They have programs that will tell you the pitch. And pitch correction software will do that. Auto-tune or Melodyne. But you're not going to learn anything that way. I mean you you get the real ear-mental workout by using your ears. Like only knowing how to tune your guitar with an electronic tuner or doing math with a calculator. I use a calculator because my math sucks. But if I wanted to improve my math skills I'd put the calculator away.

    Those writing programs that generate progressions for you- I'm a composer. 90% of my tunes have progressions you couldn't guess. I mean that's half the fun and creativity. Coming up with music is coming up with the harmony and the melody all on my own. That's kind of what makes it my own. I'd rather not share writing credit with a computer programmer.

    End of rant!

    Agree 100% .... was just saying that a single cheap tool does lots of thing vs. paying for several ones doing less each.

    I would also add I started using Transcribe! while not having a very good ear education for rythms and intervals. I'm not a pro !! but using it to analyze songs went a long way for my own ear education, for instance recognizing rythms I heard and comparing them to piano roll blobs I could see along with markers. I agree that now with a better training I don't use Transcribe! the same way I did several years ago.

  35. #34

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    For years I used ASD but a very old version.. when I tried to upgrade I found I would have to purchase the new version. So I looked at it.. vs Transcribe .. vs Riffstation.

    When I tried both Trans and Riff for the first time I found neither really intuitive but bit the bullet and went with Transcribe.. now that I have it under my belt a bit (couple of months) I still find it less than intuitive. It is cool that you can save your settings for particular songs (but I dont do that). Otherwise it would be nice if it also had a history of last X files opened.

    So bored at work I downloaded riffstation and, now that I know what Transcribe can do, I think I prefer riffstation.
    The isolation works very well.. has a file history.. sound quality is on par with Transcribe if not a little better.
    I wish you could hide thing like The chords etc but I take what I can get.

    What I like about transcribe (I think the only thing now lol) is that when you select a loop you can nudge the start/finish by just draging. In riffstation you have to select the entire section you want to loop every time.

  36. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by SamBooka
    For years I used ASD but a very old version.. when I tried to upgrade I found I would have to purchase the new version. So I looked at it.. vs Transcribe .. vs Riffstation.

    When I tried both Trans and Riff for the first time I found neither really intuitive but bit the bullet and went with Transcribe.. now that I have it under my belt a bit (couple of months) I still find it less than intuitive. It is cool that you can save your settings for particular songs (but I dont do that). Otherwise it would be nice if it also had a history of last X files opened.

    So bored at work I downloaded riffstation and, now that I know what Transcribe can do, I think I prefer riffstation.
    The isolation works very well.. has a file history.. sound quality is on par with Transcribe if not a little better.
    I wish you could hide thing like The chords etc but I take what I can get.

    What I like about transcribe (I think the only thing now lol) is that when you select a loop you can nudge the start/finish by just draging. In riffstation you have to select the entire section you want to loop every time.
    Transcribe! does offer quick access to of recent Transcribe! saved configuration files, so history is avaliable.

    Very often, I interactively adjust the selection to be very narrow so I can focus on a very small set of notes which I can isolate by ear. This is specially true when trying to transcribe an arrangement for several instruments (I transcribed arrangements up to 8 instruments, piano included).

    I also agree that Transcribe! isn't intuitive. I sent some messages to its author about that.

    And it really takes time and effort to appreciate all things it can do.

    But I'll look at riffStation to see how intuitive it is for sure.

  37. #36

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    some of us old fogies only use transcribe to loop or slow down passages of music to decipher chords and fast single note lines....and given that transcribe meshes almost perfectly with any youtube or other downloaded video, transcribe is a more preferred choice over the Tascam CD VT2 player that I previously used for slowing down CD passages.

    I don't know all that Transcribe does, but considering I can now pick out far more youtube guitar recordings based upon sight, and controlling a videos speed, it's $39 well spent, imho...nuff said.

  38. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    Frank Vignola says he did this with Django records, slowed them down to 16 rpm (revolutions per minute.) Though this would drastically alter the pitch! I remember those "selector switches" on the record players of my youth. The options were 16, 33 (-an album), 45 (a single) and 78. My uncle Tommy had some old 78 rpm records, so I got to hear some of those. I never knew what the 16 was for----does anyone here??? Sometimes we kids would select 78 for records so that the voices would sound like Alvin and the Chipmunks. (I always thought this is how "Alvin" was discovered...)
    A records RPM factor was based upon the technology of the equipment used in a particular audio generation. And if you're real curious about records of today, especially quality 180g recordings, have a listen at an audiophiles home...you may surprise yourself...it's not your dad's record player.

    btw....has anyone ever seen the Chrysler with the turntable in the dash?....they're now worth a small mint. To solve the problem of having to flip 45rpm records, its initial format, every few minutes, they produced 7" records in a new 16 2/3 rpm format that apparently offered up to an hour of playing time a side...the benefit too was a slower speed was less prone to sending the needle amiss...depending up the quality of the road you were on. 1956...it was a very good year, as Lou Rawls would later record.

    for a history on 16rpm, here you go:

    CAPS 2010 APN


    "16 RPM appears to have originated in the 1930s, flourished in the 1950s, declined in the 1960s, and disappeared by the early 1970s as long-playing portable tape (especially cassettes) became more popular"

    A restored DeSoto with the 'record player option' :

    Last edited by 2bornot2bop; 07-31-2014 at 05:41 PM.

  39. #38

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    Made in England.

    It's nice to hear that England is still exporting some quality merchandise.

  40. #39

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    and an interesting "fact" (ok.. just my opinion).. playing an 33 1/3 album at 45 rpm raises the pitch by a fourth

    I used to learn Rush basslines and for fun play them on 45 .. just had to bump it up a string.

  41. #40

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    I can't believe no one else uses Audacity. I use it for transcribing & recording but I've only scratched the surface of its capabilities.

    Audacity: Free Audio Editor and Recorder

    Freeware!

  42. #41

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    So Tom.

    I use ASD/Transcribe/Riffstation (REALLY digging RS btw... when I get back from vacation it will be purchased even though I already paid for Transcribe.. live and learn) .. Anyway.. here is what I do with Riffstation.

    Open an MP3...

    Highlight the section I want to learn..so that it loops over and over

    Slow it down to 50% of it original speed

    If it is a song by SRV for example I knock it up a half a step.

    Isolate the guitar tones from the rest of the track so I hear mostly that specific guitar. (like the second guitar in the Deep Purple Highway Star solo)

    Press a button to invert the filter (so you hear everything BUT the part .. kinda like Karaoke)

    Close the program and come back the next day to find it in my history.


    Audacity IS an amazing program for free .. but I haven't been able to do the things above with it as quickly and easily.
    It is like talking to my brother in law about loop pedal. He says he doesn't need one.. he just mic's his amp.. runs it into Reaper.. trims the track and sets it to loop. OR .. with a looper.. you can just stomp your foot once to record and once to stop. Both work..

    When I was growing up I used to use tapes if I was borrowing from friends or albums if they were mine.. was pretty good at flipping the needle back 15 seconds or so (hard on the needle.. hard on the albums but whatever ) It was a PITA so I really had to train my ear too.

    Well now my ear is still pretty good BUT I have a full time job and two very young kids.. I still want to play guitar but I don't want to spend so much time trying to figure out what Howard Roberts is playing in Relaxin at Camarillo..

    WOW.. that post was too long... accept my apologies.

  43. #42

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    Riffstation sounds pretty cool. There is probably a somewhat higher learning curve with Audacity...and if I didn't have a brother that is a computer geek to show me exactly how to use it, I'd still be using the half-speed function on windows media player...

  44. #43

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    How does this compare to song surgeon which cost $59? Is one better than the other?

  45. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by Patriots2006
    How does this compare to song surgeon which cost $59? Is one better than the other?
    There has been a older thread about them: https://www.jazzguitar.be/forum/recor...g-surgeon.html

    I never heard of Song Surgeon so far, so I had a look at the corresponding web site.

    Apparently, Song Surgeon is very similar to Transcribe! Difference probably lies in the details, which cannot really be assessed without an exhaustive comparative trial using several different music pieces. It seems that many features which appeared in Song Surgeon 4 were added to better match those available in Transcribe!

    What would really be the most important feature to compare carefully is the sound quality when the song is significantly slowed down say 5x to 20x (not sure Song Surgeon can do 20x, but Transcribe! can and I used it a couple of times to analyze very fast music segments, like 8th note triplets played at 200 bpm). A bit subjective however.

    Another aspect to compare is the UI. specially how does one navigate along the song. They look similar, but I didn't try using Song Surgeon (yet!).

    There are a few features which aren't available in Transcribe! like the ability to attach audio annotations (text only in Transcribe!), and the ability to define a set of successive tempos to be used when looping over a selection.

    On the other hand, there seem to be no MIDI piano roll display and no note recognition in Song Surgeon, which I found useful to analyse music containing many instruments. I found this Transcribe! feature very useful at times (specially the clicking on a piano roll blob to hear the note and identify which instrument plays it). The chord name recognition feature is appealing to some but not necessary to everyone. I never used it.

    Transcribe! is definitely a bit cheaper, and the demo version can be freely used for one elapsed month, while Song Surgeon can be used for four music playing hours.

    Best is to download demo versions and decide by yourself. So far, I've been very satisfied with Transcribe! and I don't perceive the need for me to switch to Song Surgeon, based on what I could read on the web site.
    Last edited by mhch; 08-04-2014 at 04:45 AM.

  46. #45

    User Info Menu

    A feature I learnt not so long ago is the loopline which can be shown above the spectrum, which appeared in a recent Transcribe! update

    It shows all the loop sections that have been created along with their names if any. It even allows for creating loops and naming them from the current selection.

    That's super convenient to access and play created loops later on and keep track of the work you have done on music pieces: when I load an audio or a video file into Transcribe!, my first action is to run the file and create all the sections I want (not necessarily all of them at once), for instance each tune in a long fil, or subsequences in a video, or whatever.

    Invaluable to analyse a tune or a video, creating A, B \sections, naming video subsequences, and putting comments or chord names in the text zone

  47. #46

    User Info Menu

    I just discovered the arrow key function in Youtube, moves you back or foward a few seconds. Great for learning stuff from songs.

  48. #47

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by fep
    I just discovered the arrow key function in Youtube, moves you back or foward a few seconds. Great for learning stuff from songs.
    Arrows go back and forward 5 seconds at a time. You can also use J and L to go back and forward in 10 second increments, or period and comma to move forward and backward one frame at a time.

    There are also extensions that let you loop and change speed without changing pitch, like Transpose for Chrome.

  49. #48

    User Info Menu

    I do a lot of transcribing from video. Before Transcribe i use VLC player (for windows NOT mac) and enjoyed that workflow. Never enjoyed using VLC with the mac tho cuz the interface and loop functions don't work well for me.

    Enter transcribe. I downloaded the free trial on my Imac. Its so awesome with the big 27 inch monitor. I really love it. That said I never wright down solos. I only memorize. So I'm just enjoying the loop, speed and video functionality. Its pretty awesome and I will be buying it.