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  1. #1

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    Our own David L. turned me on to Ben Monder's solo guitar playing earlier this year. I love the way Ben uses dissonance and his arrangements are really cool too.

    I'm just wondering if anyone knows of other players playing solo guitar in this dissonant/spacey style?

    Here's one of my own dissonant efforts from a few months ago but I've written more since ( though I'm not 100% happy with them yet).

    https://youtube.com/shorts/bhRLrHUa5u8?feature=share

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Thanks for sharing. I like your playing.

    After listening to Monder’s rendition of My One and Only Love, I thought you might enjoy Bill Frisell: NYGF Red Sofa Concert:



    Hopefully the link is usable (I’m on a mobile app).

  4. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by osloutah
    Thanks for sharing. I like your playing.

    After listening to Monder’s rendition of My One and Only Love, I thought you might enjoy Bill Frisell: NYGF Red Sofa Concert:



    Hopefully the link is usable (I’m on a mobile app).
    Thanks. Frissell is great. I was lucky enough to see him live once improvising the soundtrack to a movie about the banks of the Mississippi breaking.

  5. #4

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    One of the early pioneers of dissonant/free jazz guitar playing:

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Liarspoker
    Thanks. Frissell is great. I was lucky enough to see him live once improvising the soundtrack to a movie about the banks of the Mississippi breaking.
    i believe the film you are thinking of is 'The Great Flood'.
    It was conceived and made as a collaboration between the film maker Bill Morrison and Bill Frisell, who did the awesomely atmospheric soundtrack.

    Icarus Films: The Great Flood

  7. #6

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  8. #7

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    Marc Ribot for sure. Miles Okazaki released an incredible CD set of ALL of Monk's tunes for solo guitar...a must have. As mentioned, Bill Frisell has a poetic mastery of tonal music that uses chromaticism, dissonance and space to create surprizingly compelling solo work as well as beautifully crafted. James Emery of the String Trio of New York plays only his D'Aquisto New Yorker unamplified and very edgy melodies conveyed through that beautiful acoustic tone. Peter Bernstein is a master of modern harmony and he's got an acoustic solo sensibility in all he plays. Joe Morris is a great player, teacher and has a take on playing that's all his own, but I don't know what he's done as an unaccompanied soloist. And don't forget the grandaddy of us all: Jim Hall.
    Last edited by Jimmy blue note; 12-06-2021 at 11:52 PM.

  9. #8

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    Liberty Ellman might interest you.


  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by curbucci
    JAKOB BRO

    Ralph Towner:

    (video snipped)
    Guess you (and osloutah who liked the post) are YT Premium members. Video is not listenable to other listeners. Please consider this for future posts.

  11. #10

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    You may like to check out our own forum member:

    - Jakub Zolubak Trio - Live at JazzState



    Album is out on the usual streaming platforms now. Very frisellesque.


    Gesendet von iPhone mit Tapatalk

  12. #11

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    Jessica Ackerley



    Mary Halvorson



    Sarah Lipstate


  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Liarspoker
    . . . other players playing solo guitar in this dissonant/spacey style?
    One person's "dissonant" and "spacey" is another's "right down the stripe."

    Here's the player who dominated the solo guitar scene when Bill Frisell was first making his mark:

  14. #13

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    Not to nit pick the OP too much, but when you say 'dissonant' do you maybe mean 'harmonically adventurous' or fresh'?

    'Dissonant' is often wrongly used to describe anything that rubs the ear in an unexpected way. I once recorded a tune in a friend's home studio. He was a rocker and used to major or 7th chords, right? I was playing some 2nds, at times off a tritone he wasn't used to hearing. We were editing something and to indicate the right spot to edit he said 'you know, where you use your dissonance'. Wrong, b/c what I was doing was CONsonant in the the context of the piece, which had those intervals in it from the jump.

    If you were writing or blowing, say, on a tune that had all quartral harmony and you suddenly threw in thirds that would be dissonant to the piece.

    A harmonic language to use can be anything we want---long as it's consistent. Things that break that consistency stick out like sore thumbs and are----dissonant.

    And now I'll listen at the provided links and enjoy those harmonically adventurous solo players! LOL...
    Last edited by joelf; 12-07-2021 at 06:59 AM.

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont
    Liberty Ellman might interest you.

    Nice language; ideas; touch. Good, thoughtful performance...

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    Not to nit pick the OP too much, but when you say 'dissonant' do you maybe mean 'harmonically adventurous' or fresh'?

    'Dissonant' is often wrongly used to describe anything that rubs the ear in an unexpected way. I once recorded a tune in a friend's home studio. He was a rocker and used to major or 7th chords, right? I was playing some 2nds, at times off a tritone he wasn't used to hearing. We were editing something and to indicate the right spot to edit he said 'you know, where you use your dissonance'. Wrong, b/c what I was doing was CONsonant in the the context of the piece, which had those intervals in it from the jump.

    If you were writing or blowing, say, on a tune that had all quartral harmony and you suddenly threw in thirds that would be dissonant to the piece.

    A harmonic language to use can be anything we want---long as it's consistent. Things that break that consistency stick out like sore thumbs and are----dissonant.

    And now I'll listen at the provided links and enjoy those harmonically adventurous solo players! LOL...
    So more like the cut of Mr. Dailey's jib:

  17. #16

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    One player who really has the conjunes to take it out and stick to his guns, and is also very grounded in 'regular' playing, is Dom Minasi. He doesn't get much love here, but that may be b/c he's not too well-known beyond NY. I've known and have admired him for years...






    And to show him taking it 'in' (When Joanna Loved Me was when he was on Blue Note years ago):




  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    One player who really has the conjunes to take it out and stick to his guns, and is also very grounded in 'regular' playing, is Dom Minasi. He doesn't get much love here, but that may be b/c he's not too well-known beyond NY. I've known and have admired him for years...






    And to show him taking it 'in' (When Joanna Loved Me was when he was on Blue Note years ago):





    Thanks for posting this. I love discovering players here.

  19. #18
    Thanks for all your recommendations. They are appreciated very much. I'll go through them all.

    Please keep posting if you can recommend any other players

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    One player who really has the conjunes to take it out and stick to his guns, and is also very grounded in 'regular' playing, is Dom Minasi. He doesn't get much love here, but that may be b/c he's not too well-known beyond NY. I've known and have admired him for years...






    And to show him taking it 'in' (When Joanna Loved Me was when he was on Blue Note years ago):



    Dom's a great player, great teacher too and a really nice guy.

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Sherry
    One person's "dissonant" and "spacey" is another's "right down the stripe."

    Here's the player who dominated the solo guitar scene when Bill Frisell was first making his mark:
    Where would Candyrat be without the revolutionary Hedges?

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Liarspoker
    Our own David L. turned me on to Ben Monder's solo guitar playing earlier this year. I love the way Ben uses dissonance and his arrangements are really cool too.

    I'm just wondering if anyone knows of other players playing solo guitar in this dissonant/spacey style?

    Here's one of my own dissonant efforts from a few months ago but I've written more since ( though I'm not 100% happy with them yet).

    https://youtube.com/shorts/bhRLrHUa5u8?feature=share
    If you can find the recording "Once Upon A Guitar" by Mark Diorio, it's fantastic. Mark studied for a long time with Sal Mosca. Brilliant stuff, really.