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  1. #1

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    Must have recordings, etc?

    I'm listening to some old Phil Woods, and I'm impressed by Salvador's playing. It's a name I've heard/read over the years, but never really followed up on. What are some good records of his either as leader or sideman?




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  3. #2

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    I have this one on vinyl which is pretty good (Kenton presents Sal Salvador):

    Last edited by grahambop; 08-14-2021 at 05:18 AM.

  4. #3

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    Looks like the recording you posted was actually a Sal Salvador record (I wondered why Phil Woods didn't take the first solo!):

    SHADES OF SAL SALVADOR

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop
    I have this one on vinyl which is pretty good (Kenton presents Sal Salvador):

    That's my only SS record, good stuff...

  6. #5

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    I have a few of his LPs, and if you can find it, I recommend "Juicy Lucy," worth it if only for his version of "Opus de Funk." Also features a stellar group, Billy Taylor, Art Davis and Joe Morello.

  7. #6

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    My favorite Salvador album is Frivolous Sal, with Eddie Costa (p, vib), George Roumanias (b), Jimmy Campbell (d).


  8. #7

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    Anyone hear study with Sal?

    The guys I knew in Brooklyn in the 60's talked about going to Manhattan to study with Sal.

    That was remarkable, because we had Sid Margolis, Jack Wilkins and Carl Barry in the neighborhood music school, although Jack and Carl were young guys then.

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop
    Looks like the recording you posted was actually a Sal Salvador record (I wondered why Phil Woods didn't take the first solo!):

    SHADES OF SAL SALVADOR
    I assumed that was the case, but the album liner notes doesn't mention anything about the original releases

  10. #9
    Thanks to all for the suggestions in the thread. I'm following up on them

  11. #10

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    Gretsch player, nice sound.

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by rpjazzguitar
    Anyone hear study with Sal?

    The guys I knew in Brooklyn in the 60's talked about going to Manhattan to study with Sal.

    That was remarkable, because we had Sid Margolis, Jack Wilkins and Carl Barry in the neighborhood music school, although Jack and Carl were young guys then.
    I studied with Allen Hanlon in the late 70's. Allen shared a studio with Sal Salvador and Barry Galbraith and I got to shoot the breeze with all three of those amazing guitarists. Allen and Sal performed together as a 2 guitar duo and there is a live album of that collaboration.

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop
    Looks like the recording you posted was actually a Sal Salvador record (I wondered why Phil Woods didn't take the first solo!):

    SHADES OF SAL SALVADOR
    They grew up together in Springfield Massachusetts, and had a kid's jazz group. Maybe that's the way they did it when they were kids.
    SS also had a big band that put out a few records.
    He's featured on the Stan Kenton piece, "Invention for Trumpet and Guitar", which also featured a very young Maynard Ferguson.
    A great guitarist friend of mine, Bob Grillo, edited Sal's excellent Single String Guitar Studies book.

    SS was Elliot Randall's guitar teacher back in the 60s, and ER gives SS credit for making great strides in his development as a guitarist and musician.

    SS was featured in the well-known documentary "Jazz On a Summer's Day" about the Newport Jazz Festival, which features him playing a long blues solo (uptempo) while they show the seaport scenes.

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgcim
    They grew up together in Springfield Massachusetts, and had a kid's jazz group. Maybe that's the way they did it when they were kids.
    SS also had a big band that put out a few records.
    He's featured on the Stan Kenton piece, "Invention for Trumpet and Guitar", which also featured a very young Maynard Ferguson.
    A great guitarist friend of mine, Bob Grillo, edited Sal's excellent Single String Guitar Studies book.

    SS was Elliot Randall's guitar teacher back in the 60s, and ER gives SS credit for making great strides in his development as a guitarist and musician.

    SS was featured in the well-known documentary "Jazz On a Summer's Day" about the Newport Jazz Festival, which features him playing a long blues solo (uptempo) while they show the seaport scenes.
    SS was in SS's band in that video [Sonny Stitt]

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon
    SS was in SS's band in that video [Sonny Stitt]
    Never knew that.

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgcim
    Never knew that.


  17. #16

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    I prefer his big band and quartet with brass recordings. He really shines in these recordings. I like his small group stuff but these three albums really give him some compartmentalization for his solos which is where I think he performs better. The quartet with brass is a great sound I would guess he probably picked up from his work with Kenton.

    1958 Colors in Sound Decca Quartet with Brass
    1959 The Beat For This Generation Decca Big Band
    1963 You Ain't Heard Nothin' Yet! Dauntless Big Band

  18. #17

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    Also studied with Sal for 4 years at UB in Bridgeport CT.
    Most concerts at UB were with Allen Hanlon.
    Great guy and party guy.....
    Hung out with the college players a bit.
    Snuck in with Sal and a couple of other students to see Linc Chamberlin one night ...not to be seen by Linc or his students.
    A bit of a rivalry back then.
    Also Sal said he changed his name to Sal Salvador........
    Lots of technical books if you were studying with him...lots of them

    Check out "Invention" I think with Kenton.
    Sal at his best.....

    .

  19. #18

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    The story I've heard goes that when Sal arrived in New York he was broke and Johnny Smith put him up in a hotel for a month, then Tal Farlow found him a room in the building he was living in. Jimmy Raney lived there too and the three would jam extensively. Sal's father apparently owned a grocery store and sent care packages that would feed the three of them. Even in the so-called golden age of live jazz in New York, times were tough.

  20. #19

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    Ha. great story!

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cunamara
    The story I've heard goes that when Sal arrived in New York he was broke and Johnny Smith put him up in a hotel for a month, then Tal Farlow found him a room in the building he was living in. Jimmy Raney lived there too and the three would jam extensively. Sal's father apparently owned a grocery store and sent care packages that would feed the three of them. Even in the so-called golden age of live jazz in New York, times were tough.
    Phil Woods mentioned that place in his autobiography, because he lived there, too. It was on Riverside and 93rd St.
    He said that John Collins, Chuck Wayne and Johnny Smith used to come over and jam with Raney and Farlow.
    He asked them if he could sit in, but they said, "You're not ready".

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzimprov
    Also studied with Sal for 4 years at UB in Bridgeport CT.
    Most concerts at UB were with Allen Hanlon.
    Great guy and party guy.....
    Hung out with the college players a bit.
    Snuck in with Sal and a couple of other students to see Linc Chamberlin one night ...not to be seen by Linc or his students.
    A bit of a rivalry back then.
    Also Sal said he changed his name to Sal Salvador........
    Lots of technical books if you were studying with him...lots of them

    Check out "Invention" I think with Kenton.
    Sal at his best.....

    .
    I keep taking out "A Place Within", a LC album I bought a long time ago, to see if I dig his playing, but it still makes no sense to me.
    What did Sal think of Linc?

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgcim
    Phil Woods mentioned that place in his autobiography...
    Autobiography? I thought he didn't live to finish it. I'd LOVE to read THAT! Phil didn't hold back from or about ANYTHING...

  24. #23

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    I hate to be the wet blanket here. I know a lot of people studied w/him in CT. I feel this way after hearing him on these tracks and Jazz on a Summer's Day:

    Competent; nice sound; knew the vocab; got the job done----but pretty ordinary and even undistinguished as a soloist. His swing feel was OK but kind of square and near corny, and he was pretty bland and uninteresting note choice-wise, especially compared to the players mentioned on this thread. Just too symmetrical and predictable and he never went anywhere that perked my ears up.

    Which is not to be disrespectful to the OP or Salvador or say the man was a poor musician---not even close to that. He was a pro and I respect that. But the other players mentioned here (as soloists) were in a different class---and so were Joe Puma and Dick Garcia, 2 other white players (meaning they played with mostly white bands, not by choice but by social and hierarchal circumstances) from that period...

  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgcim
    Phil Woods mentioned that place in his autobiography, because he lived there, too. It was on Riverside and 93rd St.
    He said that John Collins, Chuck Wayne and Johnny Smith used to come over and jam with Raney and Farlow.
    He asked them if he could sit in, but they said, "You're not ready".
    Imagine being a fly on the wall for *those* jams!

  26. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    I hate to be the wet blanket here. I know a lot of people studied w/him in CT. I feel this way after hearing him on these tracks and Jazz on a Summer's Day:

    Competent; nice sound; knew the vocab; got the job done----but pretty ordinary and even undistinguished as a soloist. His swing feel was OK but kind of square and near corny, and he was pretty bland and uninteresting note choice-wise, especially compared to the players mentioned on this thread. Just too symmetrical and predictable and he never went anywhere that perked my ears up.

    Which is not to be disrespectful to the OP or Salvador or say the man was a poor musician---not even close to that. He was a pro and I respect that. But the other players mentioned here (as soloists) were in a different class---and so were Joe Puma and Dick Garcia, 2 other white players (meaning they played with mostly white bands, not by choice but by social and hierarchal circumstances) from that period...
    I only heard him once. I think it was at SUNY Purchase, NY. He was older and his playing was pretty uninspiring. Could have been his age.
    Now I saw Linc Chamberlain play at a small club in Port Chester and he was an early influence on me. Those were some out jams.


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