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  1. #1

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    Wes with the Lionel Hampton orchestra. He plays about 2:00 and the thumb technique is in full display.


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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    My mentor, Cootie Harris, used to play with the Hampton band.

    Wes is looking cool and playing hot!

  4. #3

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    Awesome! Looks like a nice, pretty new ES-300 he has there too.

  5. #4

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    Wes was about Hendrix' age (when Hendrix was really breaking out), at that point...and playing hot, too.

  6. #5

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    You can really hear the early influence of Charlie Christian. At the time, who could guess Wes would eventually be on a metaphorical equal pedestal with Charlie.

  7. #6

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    AndyV,

    +1

    You sure can hear Charlie Christian in that solo by Wes.

  8. #7

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    Charlie Christian recorded with Hamp because of the Benny Goodman connection.

    So, in 1949, that was quite a gig for a guitarist.

    And, his tone sounded like Wes.

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone View Post
    Wes with the Lionel Hampton orchestra. He plays about 2:00 and the thumb technique is in full display.

    Jeez---what a BAND!

    Da joint was JUMPIN'!...

  10. #9

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    That's when people went to hear live Jazz music because it was FUN and GREAT MUSIC! And, those antics sure didn't effect their musicianship. These time are gone forever . . . I wonder what "How To" books THEY read to play Jazz???
    Play live???? . . . Marinero

  11. #10

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    I think I read somewhere that part of Wes' regimen when he was woodshedding in the early days was to learn everything that Charlie Christian ever recorded. I sound more like Herb Ellis than anyone else (another CC disciple), but CC, Wes, and Django will always be my personal triumvirate.

  12. #11

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    Tom,

    I, too, come out sounding most like Herb Ellis, no matter what. Over my lifetime I have probably listened to Wes, Grant Green, and Kenny Burrell about 2-1 each more than Ellis--but Ellis really sticks in my head, I guess.

    As you said, though, he's another CC disciple.

  13. #12

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    These last few posts have been interesting. I 've long been a little frustrated that no matter what I do, no matter how much Jimmy Raney or Joe Pass I learn, when I just improvise, I come out sounding like Barney Kessel. That's not just my impression either. Others will say "Dude, you must love Kessel, you sound like him."

    Now that of course is not a bad thing at all, I wish I did have a fraction of Kessel's ability. But I'm not really trying to sound like him, and he's not necessarily my top favorite player though I admire him. But something about his playing is very infectious and if I listen to him for even 10 minutes something about his style just starts showing up in my playing.

    I really wonder if the Ellis-Kessel thing is actually Charlie Christian. CC's lines are so fundamental for "lead" guitar playing, maybe that link makes these guys "stick."

  14. #13

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    Everything I play sounds like me . . . and believe me that's not who you want to sound like!

  15. #14

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    Great Big Band & Great Show...
    Wes is playing like Wes...

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero View Post
    That's when people went to hear live Jazz music because it was FUN and GREAT MUSIC! And, those antics sure didn't effect their musicianship. These time are gone forever . . . I wonder what "How To" books THEY read to play Jazz???
    Play live???? . . . Marinero
    You just can't help yourself; It must be an addiction.

    Can't you see that you're implying (yet again), that all of today jazz musicians, especially those under 40, are somehow lacking?

    E.g. instead of "these times are gone forever", why not post "today, it is a lot harder to find such an experience".

  17. #16

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    I think I sound more like Herb Ellis than any other well known player not because I listened to him more or because he was my favorite but because my first teacher taught me beginning improvisation this way - it's not the same as 'CAGED', because it's not based on open chord shapes, but any moveable chord shape:

    "The 'Shape System' relates melodic ideas to basic chord shapes instead of relating them to endless scale patterns, modes, and arpeggios. In addition to being an efficient use of practice time, this system allows the player to sound more natural and musical instead of sounding like somebody playing scales." ~ Herb Ellis.

    Actually, I always wanted to sound like Howard Roberts, but in that I seem to have failed miserably!

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by ThatRhythmMan View Post
    Awesome! Looks like a nice, pretty new ES-300 he has there too.
    The tp says it's a 300, right ?

    Is the pu a P-90 ? Just curious - can't see for sure.

    Thx

  19. #18

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    As much as I’d like to sound like Barney and Wes, Gabor Szabos clanging open string style creeps into my playing more than any other player.

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis D View Post
    The tp says it's a 300, right ?

    Is the pu a P-90 ? Just curious - can't see for sure.

    Thx
    Yeah, the general appearance, tailpiece, inlays say ES-300. Definitely a P90 pickup.

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by ThatRhythmMan View Post
    Yeah, the general appearance, tailpiece, inlays say ES-300. Definitely a P90 pickup.

    I just can't help thinking about one of those just like that, from that era, but with a cutaway.....

    ...oh well.....

  22. #21

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    I play EXACTLY like Wes...and then I wake up...

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by jameslovestal View Post
    You just can't help yourself; It must be an addiction.

    Can't you see that you're implying (yet again), that all of today jazz musicians, especially those under 40, are somehow lacking?

    E.g. instead of "these times are gone forever", why not post "today, it is a lot harder to find such an experience".
    Hi, J,
    It's not an addiction . . . it's MY sad reality based on MY observation of music today. It's certainly not politically correct, a product of group think, or intended to assuage the feelings of generations of robotic musicians and those who listen to their music. And, although I've never said "all"-- the lack of real talent is grossly disproportionate to those with real talent. I know there are those on this Forum who are/have been professional performers but if I had to place a Vegas bet, they are certainly in the minority based on the thousands of conversations I've read to date. I'm a player. I had my first paid job as a vocalist ,at 12, in a resort tavern in Wisconsin 3 nights a week and played my first paid job on guitar at 14 at the Holiday Ballroom in Chicago when my R@R/Soul band opened for the Buckinghams. I played as a guitarist/saxophonist in R@B/Soul/Funk bands until I was 22 when I led many Jazz/Rock Big Bands for ten years as a full-time saxophonist/arranger until the early 80's when the jobs disappeared for all but the few and lucky. After leaving music to start a business, I returned to study Classical Guitar and until Covid, have played paid part-time gigs for the last 30 years. So, if I seem hyper-critical, it's true. And, I have nothing to prove to anyone. But, my remarks are based on my experiences as a working musician . . not a bedroom dilettante or a YT imagined phenom.
    So, J, there are some of us who have strong opinions about things in life and those who don't. But, my beliefs are based on years of paid performances on the best learning platform--the stage. That's the proving ground . . . not your bedroom in front of a video camera editing your playing and tweaking your sound electronically for perfection for throngs of viewers with slavish, inexperienced praise or listening to generations of formally-educated robots who, to me, all sound the same. And, I don't need others to agree with me for validation of my thoughts and feelings. Simple.
    Finally, I won't disagree with your remarks since they are reasonable and our tastes in music, generally, are very close. But, thankfully, I still feel passionate about quality Music and where it is headed for future generations. Sometimes I think of a woman I knew who cultivated beautiful, unusual roses in her garden. One day when I stopped by for a visit, she was very upset because she lost her prize rose bush to stem cankers that had been killing the bush over time even though she suspected something was wrong. I guess life is that way sometimes. Thanks for your honest reply.

    Play live??? . . . Marinero

  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero View Post
    Hi, J,
    It's not an addiction . . . it's MY sad reality based on MY observation of music today. It's certainly not politically correct, a product of group think, or intended to assuage the feelings of generations of robotic musicians and those who listen to their music. And, although I've never said "all"-- the lack of real talent is grossly disproportionate to those with real talent. I know there are those on this Forum who are/have been professional performers but if I had to place a Vegas bet, they are certainly in the minority based on the thousands of conversations I've read to date. I'm a player. I had my first paid job as a vocalist ,at 12, in a resort tavern in Wisconsin 3 nights a week and played my first paid job on guitar at 14 at the Holiday Ballroom in Chicago when my R@R/Soul band opened for the Buckinghams. I played as a guitarist/saxophonist in R@B/Soul/Funk bands until I was 22 when I led many Jazz/Rock Big Bands for ten years as a full-time saxophonist/arranger until the early 80's when the jobs disappeared for all but the few and lucky. After leaving music to start a business, I returned to study Classical Guitar and until Covid, have played paid part-time gigs for the last 30 years. So, if I seem hyper-critical, it's true. And, I have nothing to prove to anyone. But, my remarks are based on my experiences as a working musician . . not a bedroom dilettante or a YT imagined phenom.
    So, J, there are some of us who have strong opinions about things in life and those who don't. But, my beliefs are based on years of paid performances on the best learning platform--the stage. That's the proving ground . . . not your bedroom in front of a video camera editing your playing and tweaking your sound electronically for perfection for throngs of viewers with slavish, inexperienced praise or listening to generations of formally-educated robots who, to me, all sound the same. And, I don't need others to agree with me for validation of my thoughts and feelings. Simple.
    Finally, I won't disagree with your remarks since they are reasonable and our tastes in music, generally, are very close. But, thankfully, I still feel passionate about quality Music and where it is headed for future generations. Sometimes I think of a woman I knew who cultivated beautiful, unusual roses in her garden. One day when I stopped by for a visit, she was very upset because she lost her prize rose bush to stem cankers that had been killing the bush over time even though she suspected something was wrong. I guess life is that way sometimes. Thanks for your honest reply.

    Play live??? . . . Marinero
    I appreciate hearing about your background. I'd love to hear a recording of one of your ensembles. Can you direct me?

  25. #24

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    The fellow I played with for 25 years owned a first-year ES-300. He didn't use it, so he left it long-term in my care. I used it a lot, at one point. It was, simply put, an ES-350 without the cutaway.

    It was one of my very favorite archtops. I still lament not having purchased it from my friend. At that point, I think I was hoping for a single-pickup ES-350 to work its way into my life.

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone View Post
    I appreciate hearing about your background. I'd love to hear a recording of one of your ensembles. Can you direct me?
    Hi, L,
    Is that the litmus test? The proof? I played in working bands. We never recorded. We played jobs. Every week. Every month. These were the days of reel to reel tapes. Remember? However, we did a demo-tape, once, for one of my Jazz Rock bands in 1973-1974(?). I never got a copy of it and it's probably floating around in someone's attic/basement in Chicago collecting dust. However, to your intimation . . . is that how one validates a musician? Or, his past experiences? A recording? Get out of your video mania obsession Lawson as proof of musicianship. There are millions of us floating around the States that were working musicians that NEVER RECORDED in the 60's/70's/early 80's and could care less about being approved by millions in our New Age virtual world. Funny. Real funny. And, did I say sad?
    Play live??? No, Man . . . make a video . . . . Marinero

    P.S.
    If we ever get past Covid, I promise you'll be the first person I'll invite to my next gig. However, a warning . . . you better bring a video camera or no one will believe you. M