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  1. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    I was never a huge fan of vibrato, especially fast vibrato like Beck's. It was more natural in the Chicago blues players, especially Albert King. Fast comes off as nervous to me.

    And it goes across the board: I'd enjoy Sidney Bechet more w/o it; singers like Eartha Kitt drive me bananas, and let's don't even talk about Buffy St. Marie. Toe-curling. With Pops I buy it, it was real and went with his melodicism---a little Creole 'sauce' at the end of a phrase. But Bird; Miles; Clifford; Diz never used it much. Stan Getz did, but I enjoyed him most 'bare naked'---especially in his later years.

    I guess it's cool, as valid a device as any---and easy peasy on guitar (or a horn). Just don't do it nervous...
    I think you misunderstand. I said vibrato BAR- not vibrato (shaking a note). AKA "tremolo bridge", "whammy bar".

    Jeff Beck-jpg

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    I'm watching him smash a guitar, which to me is a sacrilege. I don't care if it's Hendrix; Pete Townsend or who-all else. Instruments, especially back then, carried the souls of the makers who put so much love & craft into them. This shallow, theatrical stuff is a big part of what put me off rock.

    (Charlie Christian didn't hurt either (; )...
    JB was not into smashing guitars. An exception was in the movie Blow-Up where the director had him do it.

    The film Blow-Up that you appeared in with the Yardbirds was included briefly in the doc, but it didn’t mention that you had to smash your guitar like Pete Townshend. How do you feel about that all these years later?


    Well, clearly the Who was asked to do it and they said no. I wasn’t in the position to argue when they paid us a lot of money, and it was a proper, professional film with an Italian producer-director [Michelangelo Antonioni], and he just said, “You’ll smash your guitar.” And I said, “No, I won’t.” It was a sunburst Les Paul. He said, “We’ll buy you another one.” He didn’t grasp that you don’t do that to most guitars. So they rented six beginner guitars, and they were so cheap they came in a clear plastic bag [laughs]. I remember there wasn’t much left of them when we finished. I thought, “OK, if you want me to be Pete Townshend, I’ll do it. Who’s going to argue when the money was there?” I thought I’d get some stick from Pete, but I never did.


    The thing is, I used to smash amps up anyway – out of rage rather than showbiz. If they crackled, they were finished, and they would end up on the floor. Pete may have seen us play. I doubt it, but if he came recruiting from the band, he would have seen me do that – bash the amp and genuinely treat the guitar like a piece of shit.

  4. #28

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    Roy Buchanan on acid.

  5. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by ruger9
    I think you misunderstand. I said vibrato BAR- not vibrato (shaking a note). AKA "tremolo bridge", "whammy bar".

    Jeff Beck-jpg
    Same effect. I meant the speed anyway. Heard him do it fast w/the bar...

  6. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by zdub
    JB was not into smashing guitars. An exception was in the movie Blow-Up where the director had him do it.
    I don't know if he broke guitars a la Townsend/Hendrix, but a big point was made in the film of his unhappiness with the Yardbirds kicking amps, resulting in mgmt. having to get several new ones a week. And he DID smash a guitar to bits backstage, then disappeared.

    Anyway one time is a time too many...

  7. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop
    Roy Buchanan on acid.
    thanks Rob..for those who are not familiar with Buchanan..do look him up..he was "one" with his guitar

    of the three Yardbirds guitarists who went on to great careers Beck , for me, stood alone..

    while he didnt seem to get the "superstar" badge that Page and Clapton wore he is still doing it "his way"..and I am glad he is..

    a inspiration to anyone new to guitar that have late 60's and beyond musical tastes and may want to venture into Becks style..

    we have to remember he has been doing this for over 50 years..to me he is true to his interpretation of the music he plays and is a master
    at subtle tone changes..crunchy distortion and FXs all within the same solo and does it with ease..

    he has ventured into jazz/fusion and it seems natural to him ..then he can be part of an "Elvis" band-and rock-a billy like his name was donny lee..

  8. #32

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    So after Wired and Blow by Blow, what is the next best Jeff Beck album?

  9. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by BWV
    So after Wired and Blow by Blow, what is the next best Jeff Beck album?
    I don’t really know (I only have those two), but looking around online, some people seem to think There and Back is almost as good. I think it was his next album, so in a somewhat similar vein. I haven’t heard it though.

  10. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by BWV
    So after Wired and Blow by Blow, what is the next best Jeff Beck album?
    Always liked his 1968 album, Truth.

  11. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by BWV
    So after Wired and Blow by Blow, what is the next best Jeff Beck album?
    His album Rock N Roll Party--honoring Les Paul--is a fun album and shows he can do something besides just feedback and twang a whammy bar.

    In addition to Wired and Blow by Blow, I also like his early Jeff Beck Group albums with Rod Stewart on vox.

  12. #36

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    That reminds me he played guitar on at least one of Mick Jagger's solo albums. Interesting pairing, and makes you think what if the Stones had hired Beck as a replacement for one of their guitarists who had left the band...

  13. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff
    That reminds me he played guitar on at least one of Mick Jagger's solo albums. Interesting pairing, and makes you think what if the Stones had hired Beck as a replacement for one of their guitarists who had left the band...
    hmm..if Beck joined the Stones..I can see it now.. ( Paper Headline)---Keith Richards increases drug intake..doctors baffled..

  14. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    Couldn't disagree more. Santana's early solos were classics to be studied. I even copped some of his stuff on Oyo Coma Va. And I never felt Beck's time was his real strong suit---to me HE was the square one.

    But different strokes...
    Beck is a rhythmic monster. If you can't hear that in the examples above or just about anything from Blow by Blow or Wired, it may be time to turn those ears up another notch.

  15. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    OK, corny as hell for sure (the 'rap'). But when you strip that away he's speaking some real truth and wisdom...
    I'm yet to hear one illuminating comment from CS in those documentaries and classes. He comes across like a second-rate astrologer selling dodgy horoscopes at a street fair.

  16. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    He was flashy from jump street. Listen to Jeff's Boogie---the ones the dopey talking heads were mooning over on the doc. Guitar trickery. Compare it to any decent boogie or blues player, Chuck Berry even, for honest, raw feeling. You can't. He had an unfortunate attraction to the trickster side of Les Paul---even stole things outright. But he was young, and deepened with time. I think he knew his melodic gift was the real deal, and I very much credit him for that.

    That trickster aspect is why I put him down for so long, until I recovered and listened louder...
    Flash has a long electric guitar history: T-Bone Walker, Guitar Slim, Albert Collins, Buddy Guy. As long as it's saddled with content, I'll go along for the ride...
    Last edited by PMB; 07-20-2021 at 08:05 PM.

  17. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff
    That reminds me he played guitar on at least one of Mick Jagger's solo albums. Interesting pairing, and makes you think what if the Stones had hired Beck as a replacement for one of their guitarists who had left the band...
    He also made the Buddy Guy's rendition of the overworked classic, Mustang Sally come to life with his supersonic slide outro. I remember once sitting in a restaurant and a Bon Jovi song came on over the speakers. I almost jumped out of my seat when the guitar solo arrived in the middle of this MOR track and it was unmistakably Beck. BJ later remarked that he was dumbfounded by what Beck came up with using nothing more than a guitar and small amp.

    However, Jeff's a lone wolf and would have lasted about five minutes with the Stones.

  18. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by PMB
    Flash has a long electric guitar history: T-Bone Walker, Guitar Slim, Albert Collins, Buddy Guy. As long as it's saddled with content, I'll go along for the ride...
    What are you, educating me now? Tone it down and we can have a civil discussion...

  19. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by PMB
    Beck is a rhythmic monster. If you can't hear that in the examples above or just about anything from Blow by Blow or Wired, it may be time to turn those ears up another notch.
    Whatever, dude. I could see where this was going from your earlier snarky comments. Tone down the superior stuff. I don't need lessons or tweaking from you...

  20. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    What are you, educating me now? Tone it down and we can have a civil discussion...
    Apologies, Joel. I wasn't trying to educate but just reminding you of that tradition. We're back into lockdown down here so maybe feeling a little stir crazy.

  21. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by ruger9
    I think you misunderstand. I said vibrato BAR- not vibrato (shaking a note). AKA "tremolo bridge", "whammy bar".

    Jeff Beck-jpg
    This track was all played with the whammy bar. Pretty outstanding both musically and technically:


  22. #46

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    @joelf you seem to be comparing Jeff to other players to some extent? I prefer to look at it in terms of what he brings to the table which is unlike other players. And there’s a lot that he does that’s pretty individual to him.

    It’s about the sound he makes. I think he’s imaginative, very right brain - he plays guitar like a painter; he also seems to very interested in imitating vocals.

    I’m not sure he knows a thing about theory. He does things other players wouldn’t do. It’s not a jazz aesthetic or even a fusion one, because those players are more concerned with note choices and rhythmic pocket etc. Jeff on the other hand seems interested in sound and expressiveness of the notes he plays, which might seem a bit much or overwrought I guess if it’s not your taste.

    i always liked his solo on this cut, long before I realised it was Beck; simple but has some classic Jeff Beckisms in it. That bit at the end where he doubles the vocal with harmonics is pretty cool…



    i recently heard someone trying to imitate Bechet’s vibrato on a strat and it sounded like Beck haha
    Last edited by Christian Miller; 07-21-2021 at 04:29 AM.

  23. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by Christian Miller
    @joelf you seem to be comparing Jeff to other players to some extent? I prefer to look at it in terms of what he brings to the table which is unlike other players. And there’s a lot that he does that’s pretty individual to him.

    It’s about the sound he makes. I think he’s imaginative, very right brain - he plays guitar like a painter; he also seems to very interested in imitating vocals.

    I’m not sure he knows a thing about theory. He does things other players wouldn’t do. It’s not a jazz aesthetic or even a fusion one, because those players are more concerned with note choices and rhythmic pocket etc. Jeff on the other hand seems interested in sound and expressiveness of the notes he plays, which might seem a bit much or overwrought I guess if it’s not your taste.

    i always liked his solo on this cut, long before I realised it was Beck; simple but has some classic Jeff Beckisms in it. That bit at the end where he doubles the vocal with harmonics is pretty cool…



    i recently heard someone trying to imitate Bechet’s vibrato on a strat and it sounded like Beck haha
    Love that tune and JB's contribution. There was definitely mutual respect. Stevie Wonder wrote Superstition based on a drum feel played by Beck in the studio (another indication of JB's rhythmic command) and it was originally slated for Jeff's own album. The album's producers decided otherwise after hearing the commercial potential of the track and Stevie wrote 'Cause We've Ended As Lovers as a replacement gift.

  24. #48

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    Both Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page live quite near me, I ought to pop round sometime!

    My son and his mates once spoke to Jimmy in the local Tesco Express, not really where you expect to see a rock guitar god.

  25. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop
    Both Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page live quite near me, I ought to pop round sometime!

    My son and his mates once spoke to Jimmy in the local Tesco Express, not really where you expect to see a rock guitar god.
    I was told Jimmy P lived in a pre Raphelite castle in Notting hill? I refuse to believe he shops at Tesco’s.

    My world is literally falling apart.

  26. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop
    Both Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page live quite near me, I ought to pop round sometime!

    My son and his mates once spoke to Jimmy in the local Tesco Express, not really where you expect to see a rock guitar god.
    Unless they work there...