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  1. #26

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    Thanks to all for taking the time to comment.

    David

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #27

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    Kenny's "Freedom" was recorded by two different bands for Blue Note just after Midnight Blue, and one band is basically the Midnight Blue band with Herbie Hancock added. It's good stuff, but unfortunately a bit hard to find for purchase. Here's a brief post on this album: Kenny Burrell: Freedom - JazzWax

    "The Tender Gender" album from 1966 puts him with a piano trio, and like "Midnight Blue", it's easy on the ears, but still real jazz. His classic tone is in full force here.

    The previously mentioned "All Night Long" on Jazz Time is a reissue of "Men At Work" / "At the Vanguard" (1959), great trio stuff, a format he largely avoided in his 1950s-60s glory years (at least on record).

    He really came out of the gate swinging when he showed up in New York in the mid-1950s. His first few Blue Note sessions are collected on this 2-disc set:
    Introducing Kenny Burrell The First Blue Note Sessions | Discogs

    The two Coltrane quintet/sextet sessions were actually recorded 11 months apart for Prestige in 57-58, when he was pretty much the only guitar player regularly showing up on top-tier hard bop dates with cats like Art Blakey and Sonny Clark. (Grant Green started do the same in the 1960s, but to my ears Burrell blended better than any other guitarist in this context.) He and Trane show up together on other albums, but "The Cats" and "Kenny Burrell & John Coltrane" are the two where they are really front and center together. Also, Burrell's three cuts with Sonny Clark (on "My Conception") are great.

    "Watkins at Large" by Doug Watkins is another great example of Burrell hanging in with the heavyweights (Hank Mobley, Donald Byrd, Duke Jordan).

    On the organ front, Shirley Scott's "Travellin' Light" features Burrell extensively...he doesn't have a horn to compete with.

    Jimmy Smith's "Standards" CD on Blue Note (Jimmy Smith - Standards | Releases | Discogs) also has a lot of Burrell, great classic songs, and no horns in the band.

    One last one, vibes player Terry Gibbs' quartet album "Take It from Me" on Impulse from 1964 sounds like you walked into a Detroit jazz lounge and Kenny and Terry were laying down a set. Sam Jones and Louis Hayes from the Cannonball quintet are the rhythm section, so its groovy all around, and you can hear Kenny's comping well throughout.
    Last edited by 44lombard; 07-01-2021 at 01:27 AM.

  4. #28

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    I am a big fan of his trio recordings, his chord solos are sublime!

  5. #29

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    I am not just being trite, but honestly, I've never heard a Kenny Burrell album without saying "Wow, I'm glad I heard that!" You can basically just pick them at random and you'll get a great one. An utterly consistent level of excellence pervades all his recorded work.

  6. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone
    I am not just being trite, but honestly, I've never heard a Kenny Burrell album without saying "Wow, I'm glad I heard that!" You can basically just pick them at random and you'll get a great one. An utterly consistent level of excellence pervades all his recorded work.
    I'd support that notion. I have a good collection of K.B.albums and there's not one that I don't enjoy listening to...

  7. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by TOMMO
    I'd support that notion. I have a good collection of K.B.albums and there's not one that I don't enjoy listening to...
    The best Kenny Burrell albums are the ones that have "Kenny Burrell" printed on the front...

  8. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by 44lombard
    One last one, vibes player Terry Gibbs' quartet album "Take It from Me" on Impulse from 1964 sounds like you walked into a Detroit jazz lounge and Kenny and Terry were laying down a set. Sam Jones and Louis Hayes from the Cannonball quintet are the rhythm section, so its groovy all around, and you can hear Kenny's comping well throughout.
    Just got that album on your recommendation. I do love Kenny Burrell. When he's on, he's ON IT.

  9. #33

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    My favorite is his solo guitar concert cd "Tenderly"

    Last edited by curbucci; 07-03-2021 at 08:53 PM.

  10. #34

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    Being an organist, this is one of my favorites.



    This one cooks like a mofo.


  11. #35

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    You've got a lot of great Kenny Burrell suggestions there. I'd add some more of his collaborations with Jimmy Smith: Back at the Chicken Shack, Midnight Special, Fourmost and Fourmost Return are some of my favorites.

  12. #36

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    Here’s a cool one: BB King and Kenny Burrell!


  13. #37
    I strongly recommend Ode to 52nd Street.
    It's not a very well known album, but it has great songs and KB's tone is very good and mature. The first side is a suite for guitar and orchestra, the other side has a good range of blues, bossa and ballads.


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  14. #38
    Like @TOMMO typed, "I have yet to encounter a K.B. album that is not worth listening to." is pretty much how I feel too. There are some great suggestions here for sure. These may have been mentioned already, but I would add in no particular order:










    And of course, all the Village Vanguard live albums.


    Happy listening and

  15. #39

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    Guitar Forms for me, along with All Night Long and anything with Jimmy Smith, but there are no bad Burrell albums I've ever heard. Also a gracious gentleman, I booked him into Boston clubs many times.