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  1. #1

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    Post his illness, say, since 1985?

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    There's never only one but 'Live at Yoshi's' (2001) is popular.

  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1
    There's never only one but 'Live at Yoshi's' (2001) is popular.
    Oh yeah, that's an awesome one. I think it's one of the best in jazz guitar.

  5. #4

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    Picking a definitive album is hard, because each was definitive of where he was at at the time in a career spanning a very long time. I think I would choose albums that speak to me without claiming to pick some sort of objective example. I'd go with El Hombre, Starbright/Joyous Lake, The Maker, Live at Yoshi's, Remember, Formidable.

  6. #5

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    we'll be together again....& joyous lake...two great ones!

    he also did some great sessions with alto man eric kloss

    wishin pat all the best! a true philly great..and that says much!

    sorry...those are both pre- (original) illness... soon before

    post illness comeback, i like all sides now and stone blue

    cheers

  7. #6

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    I love Interchange, but I've really been enjoying
    Live At Blues Alley lately.

  8. #7

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    Having studied with Pat in the 70s and seen him perform throughout most of his career, I really like the the duo CD with Gil Goldstein, especially Pat's Open Road suite, along with it's sort of polar opposite Stone Blue, a revival of sorts of the Joyous Lake approach with the addition of the marvelous Eric Alexander, a great foil for Pat. The Remember recording has great playing but a sub-par mix. And, throughout his career, all the solo pieces, both original and his cover of Both Sides Now. I do like the Live at Yoshi's CD, but it's frustrating when Billy Hart rushes so much and covers up all the nuances with his Dave Clark 5 cymbal smashing!

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by ronjazz
    Having studied with Pat in the 70s
    So come on then - WHAT DID HE TELL YOU?

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by ronjazz
    Having studied with Pat in the 70s and seen him perform throughout most of his career, I really like the the duo CD with Gil Goldstein, especially Pat's Open Road suite, along with it's sort of polar opposite Stone Blue, a revival of sorts of the Joyous Lake approach with the addition of the marvelous Eric Alexander, a great foil for Pat. The Remember recording has great playing but a sub-par mix. And, throughout his career, all the solo pieces, both original and his cover of Both Sides Now. I do like the Live at Yoshi's CD, but it's frustrating when Billy Hart rushes so much and covers up all the nuances with his Dave Clark 5 cymbal smashing!
    Huh? Billy Hart rushes? That recording has incredible groove, energy, and drive, and Billy Hart is a big part of it. It's not some archaic dusty jazz lol

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1
    So come on then - WHAT DID HE TELL YOU?
    "Keep practicing"--what else?

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by NewNewcastleBud
    I love Interchange, but I've really been enjoying
    Live At Blues Alley lately.

  13. #12

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    Since the OP asks about Martino's post 1985 output, I'll have to say Live at Yoshi's and Interchange.

  14. #13

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    I lived in DC from ‘03 to ‘14 and got into Think Tank very deeply at the beginning of my time there. Shortly after learned Pat played Blues Alley in Georgetown every June and proceeded to freak out. Never missed him, usually multiple nights.

    Remember is a nice gift from PM to WM as well.
    Last edited by Aiq; 04-05-2021 at 05:49 PM.

  15. #14

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    “Remember”, “Think Tank”, “Formidable”.

  16. #15

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    Think Tank, for moi.

  17. #16

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    Love Live at Yoshi's, Formindable, and Undenaible for later Pat Martino.

    Could never get into Footprints, but that is 70s I think.

    My favorite is El Hombre just because I love the sound of early Pat Martino. It SOUNDS like he hung out with Wes everyday, just by listening to what he did on that early album.

    That, and the early stuff with Pat Martino as a sideman. Love his stuff with Don Patterson!

  18. #17

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    To answer a question from ragman, the lesson I remember the best was essentially two days of playing, analysis and hanging out on Jane St., with his first wife cooking pasta while we went at it. The one point that really stuck with me was after the very long lesson that included the 12-pointed star, the parental forms, and converting to minor, we were on our way out; I to my car and him uptown to a recording session, with his L5 in a really nice gig-bag, and as he hailed a taxi, he said: "Don't play for scale, unless you know you're going to learn something". A really good lesson

    As far as Live At Yoshi's and energy, Pat always had energy, I saw him many times in many different configurations, and the reason I like the duo album with Gil Goldstein is because of that simmer he had when playing very slow ballads, it was the same level of energy as when crashing through Billy Hart's relentless cymbals on the live CD. I think Stone Blue really recaptures his pre-aneurism energy and precision and creativity very well.

  19. #18

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    Post 1985? Interchange. That said, Formidable is well-named, and I saw him twice at Iridium on that tour.

  20. #19

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    With apologies to the OP Bach5G, this ain't post-1985, and it ain't even an album. But one of my favorite tracks from anyone ever is "Send in the Clowns" from We'll Be Together Again. Right from the first sock-muffled note. That and Willow Weep for Me. Sublime, imho.
    Last edited by Flat; 04-27-2021 at 08:12 PM.