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  1. #1
    My overall favorite player. Has been since Humble Pie Rockin' The Fillmore was released in 1971. Peter inspired me to start playing guitar and through him, led me to Wes and Kenny Burrell, 1 and 1A in my book of jazz guitarists.

    This was just released today and his new album will be out shortly (just preordered my copy):


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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    always liked this one..from wind of change...nice album...pre frampton comes alive era popularity madness

    opening track-




    cheers

    ps- like that hofner he's using in vid...he's had it quite a while...club 60

    young pf


  4. #3

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    I only owned the Comes Alive set back in the day (who didn't?) and didn't listen to any of his other stuff like Pie, but looking back on it he had a jazzy style imo, probably why I gravitated to him and Steve Howe in my pre jazz listening days. I think later I read an interview w him and he cited Django as desert island music for him.

  5. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    always liked this one..from wind of change...nice album...pre frampton comes alive era popularity madness

    opening track-




    cheers

    ps- like that hofner he's using in vid...he's had it quite a while...club 60

    young pf

    I bought "Wind Of Change" when it was released too, as with pretty much all of his stuff. That album remains one of my favorites of his and of all-time.


    Thanks for the post neatomic and

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon
    I only owned the Comes Alive set back in the day (who didn't?) and didn't listen to any of his other stuff like Pie, but looking back on it he had a jazzy style imo, probably why I gravitated to him and Steve Howe in my pre jazz listening days. I think later I read an interview w him and he cited Django as desert island music for him.
    That's exactly what attracted me to him as well wintermoon. His playing was (and still is) so different from anyone of the era, in that genre. Most everyone then played pentatonic, but Frampton combined jazz with blues, creating his own style. I loved (love) his tone and I guess that's why the neck pickup sound has always been my favorite.

    He's a big Django fan. According to the interviews I've read over the years, his father used to play Django's "Hot Club" album all the time and the first time he heard it, he was mesmerized.

    If you get the chance, you should check-out some of his pre-FCA stuff, like "Wind Of Change" that neatomic posted, including his Humble Pie stuff, especially Rockin' The Fillmore. The original is my favorite live album, along with the "Humble Pie Rockin' The Fillmore Complete Recordings" album which Frampton released with Jerry Shirley in 2013. I've listened to both of those albums over the years that every note is engrained in my brain. Until the Complete Recordings were released, I had no idea that the original was recorded over four shows in two nights and that different pieces of the songs were spliced together from different shows.

    An ode to Django:




    Thanks for the post wm and

  7. #6
    Don't know if you've seen this, but...:




  8. #7

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    In case anyone missed this..


  9. #8

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    He seems like a very self-aware guy. Lucky he’s still here after all he’s been through. Had to give up the hair I guess.

    As an aside, my old mate Joe N looks EXACTLY like a slightly younger (and hair-challenged) PF, to the point that when I see PF playing I think it’s Joe. (Joe didn’t have curly hair when he was younger though.) Joe’s brother, Dan, is an incredible guitarist who plays in the Twin Cities with a group called the Intergalactic Cowboy Orchestra. Check them out on YouTube.

    Peter and David Bowie were schoolmates and good friends. There’s another cool guy who was completely aware of the crazy role he had been handed to play, and did it well. They toured together in ‘87.

    Peter Frampton-189860d6-5843-424a-97ce-0a7eac06ffff-jpeg


  10. #9

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    Back in the day one hesitated to say one liked Peter Frampton, because he was SO popular, and the hair and the fact that the girls LOVED HIM. We were into groups like ELP and Jethro Tull, which definitely were not hits with the ladies or the blow-dry crowd.

    I did like his playing though. Great tone, and nice solos that made a point without showing off too much.

  11. #10

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    I had the great good fortune to watch an entire Peter Frampton concert from the backstage scaffolding directly to his left.

    It was in the Seattle Coliseum back in 1976 (or was it ’77?…good grief…). I had a vaudeville act called the Amazing Quad Brothers and we had been hired to perform a stage illusion on the apron directly below the main stage right before Frampton went on (in mid-act we almost toppled into the crowd of 43,000 but that's another story).

    While waiting our turn backstage, we suffered through several hours of dreadful, relentless hard rock performed by Blondie (NOT the Debbie Harry band), Foghat, and the J Geils Band. Then Frampton came on and everything changed.

    He was amazing. First of all, he played songs at different tempos (what a relief), including his biggest hit at the time, Do You Feel like I Do? (I guess this must have been his "Frampton Comes Alive" tour, to be honest, I hadn't been following him). He also did a number where he switched instruments, playing drums (very well), keyboards, guitar, etc. in turn.

    Great show, and what seats! About 15 feet above the performers and slightly behind them, so we heard the stage mix well.

  12. #11

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    Peter Frampton? Is it the guy who inspired Frank Zappa?
    Love this song!

  13. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff
    Back in the day one hesitated to say one liked Peter Frampton, because he was SO popular, and the hair and the fact that the girls LOVED HIM. We were into groups like ELP and Jethro Tull, which definitely were not hits with the ladies or the blow-dry crowd.

    I did like his playing though. Great tone, and nice solos that made a point without showing off too much.
    That bothered me too, especially since I had been listening to him for four or five years before FCA was released, when hardly anyone knew who he was. Then, FCA came out and well, the rest as they say, is history. I as popular as he was for those few years afterwards, I never stopped listening to him, even with a couple of sub-par albums like "I'm In You", "Premonition" and "When All The Pieces Fit", even though there are some good songs one each of those albums.


    Thanks for the post and

  14. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff
    He seems like a very self-aware guy. Lucky he’s still here after all he’s been through. Had to give up the hair I guess.

    As an aside, my old mate Joe N looks EXACTLY like a slightly younger (and hair-challenged) PF, to the point that when I see PF playing I think it’s Joe. (Joe didn’t have curly hair when he was younger though.) Joe’s brother, Dan, is an incredible guitarist who plays in the Twin Cities with a group called the Intergalactic Cowboy Orchestra. Check them out on YouTube.

    Peter and David Bowie were schoolmates and good friends. There’s another cool guy who was completely aware of the crazy role he had been handed to play, and did it well. They toured together in ‘87.

    Peter Frampton-189860d6-5843-424a-97ce-0a7eac06ffff-jpeg

    My wife and I have had the good fortunate of meeting him on a few occasions. He's always been very gracious and humble (Pie).

    According to Frampton, he always looked up to Bowie when they were kids in school, in fact, he's said that he wanted to be like him. Frampton's father was a teacher and one day he told them to bring their guitars into school, keep them in his office and come and get them during their lunch period so they could play together. They did and they used to sit on the steps and play until their lunch period ended.

    Frampton has always felt indebted to Bowie for re-introducing him as a "Guitar Player" on the tour. They were really good friends.


    Thanks for the post and

  15. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Clark
    I had the great good fortune to watch an entire Peter Frampton concert from the backstage scaffolding directly to his left.

    It was in the Seattle Coliseum back in 1976 (or was it ’77?…good grief…). I had a vaudeville act called the Amazing Quad Brothers and we had been hired to perform a stage illusion on the apron directly below the main stage right before Frampton went on (in mid-act we almost toppled into the crowd of 43,000 but that's another story).

    While waiting our turn backstage, we suffered through several hours of dreadful, relentless hard rock performed by Blondie (NOT the Debbie Harry band), Foghat, and the J Geils Band. Then Frampton came on and everything changed.

    He was amazing. First of all, he played songs at different tempos (what a relief), including his biggest hit at the time, Do You Feel like I Do? (I guess this must have been his "Frampton Comes Alive" tour, to be honest, I hadn't been following him). He also did a number where he switched instruments, playing drums (very well), keyboards, guitar, etc. in turn.

    Great show, and what seats! About 15 feet above the performers and slightly behind them, so we heard the stage mix well.
    He played keyboards with Humble Pie and I know there's video on YT of him playing a drum solo during those years. He's pretty good at both.

    I saw him a couple of times as a warm-up act back in the early '70s before FCA was released and I, along with my wife, have seen him a number of times since. I've never been disappointed. He always puts on a GREAT show! We were supposed to see him in Jacksonville in 2019 during his "The Farewell Finale Tour", but hurricane Dorian had other ideas. I hope he's still able to play/tour, by the time this pandemic ends and hopefully, he'll come around somewhere close so we can see him one last time.


    Thanks for the post and

  16. #15

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    Don't be offended but it's honestly not easy to understand that after discovering Wes Montgomery and Kenny Burrell, Peter Frampton is still the your favourite player (like now in 2021), if you're interested in jazz, that is.

    It's good to know that he was gracious and humble in person and the lead playing on that tribute to Django is excellent (I'm assuming it's him), but what is this about his jazz influence? As far as I remember, he was simply a good Brit rock guitarist with a decent voice.

    By the way, Frampton was probably popular with some girls on account of his purdy face back in the day, but my GF at the time was into Genesis, for example

  17. #16

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    A sax player friend of mine went on tour with PF, and i got a call one night from my friend telling me to come down to Nassau Coliseum, because PF wanted to talk to me.
    It seemed he told PF that i was a 'great' jazz guitarist, and PF was into jazz , and wanted to meet me.
    I told my friend I didn't give a sh-t about rock guitarists like PF, and passed on it.

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter C
    Don't be offended but it's honestly not easy to understand that after discovering Wes Montgomery and Kenny Burrell, Peter Frampton is still the your favourite player (like now in 2021), if you're interested in jazz, that is.

    It's good to know that he was gracious and humble in person and the lead playing on that tribute to Django is excellent (I'm assuming it's him), but what is this about his jazz influence? As far as I remember, he was simply a good Brit rock guitarist with a decent voice.

    By the way, Frampton was probably popular with some girls on account of his purdy face back in the day, but my GF at the time was into Genesis, for example
    Well my college girlfriend was into Brian Eno, David Bowie and Frank Zappa, not necessarily in that order. Is it any wonder I loved her?

  19. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Peter C
    Don't be offended but it's honestly not easy to understand that after discovering Wes Montgomery and Kenny Burrell, Peter Frampton is still the your favourite player (like now in 2021), if you're interested in jazz, that is.

    It's good to know that he was gracious and humble in person and the lead playing on that tribute to Django is excellent (I'm assuming it's him), but what is this about his jazz influence? As far as I remember, he was simply a good Brit rock guitarist with a decent voice.

    By the way, Frampton was probably popular with some girls on account of his purdy face back in the day, but my GF at the time was into Genesis, for example
    No offense taken.

    As I mentioned, his playing (style) is what inspired me to play guitar in the first place. He was influenced by Kenny Burrell (mainly), Wes and Django. Consequently, his playing style reflected that, unlike those of the era (of which I am a part), who were blues/pentatonic based (not that there's anything wrong with that).

    I've been listening to jazz since I was a kid (my father was a tenor sax player, so there was always jazz, or classical/opera, because of my mother, a pianist, playing in the house), so that's over 50 years ago and I've been listening to Kenny and Wes for almost as long. Just because Frampton is my overall favorite player, doesn't mean that I didn't or don't like either of them any less. Quite the contrary. Still listen to both (as well as other jazz guitarists) all the time.

    Yes, that's him, along with John Jorgenson. It's from his album "Fingerprints" (entirely instrumental), for which, he won his one and only (so far) Grammy.

    "Probably popular with some girls..."? That is undoubtedly the case!



  20. #19

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    It seems that I need to hear something played by Frampton which reflects those influences (Burrell and Montgomery).
    Hendrix was also, I believe, very appreciative of Burrell, but none of that showed up in his playing. (A jazzy sounding 2-chord vamp on the Axis album does not constitute jazz).

    The problem with learning pentatonic scale-based playing as a kid is that, in my case anyway, I had to throw it all out the window and start again from scratch. So I don't think it's "harmless", so to speak.

    Anyway, I was pleasantly surprised by the Django tune, however - can't imagine many other rockers getting close to that.

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff
    Joe’s brother, Dan, is an incredible guitarist who plays in the Twin Cities with a group called the Intergalactic Cowboy Orchestra. Check them out on YouTube.
    My band shared a bill with them years ago at a park gig; they were a lot of fun to listen to.

  22. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Peter C
    It seems that I need to hear something played by Frampton which reflects those influences (Burrell and Montgomery).
    Hendrix was also, I believe, very appreciative of Burrell, but none of that showed up in his playing. (A jazzy sounding 2-chord vamp on the Axis album does not constitute jazz).

    The problem with learning pentatonic scale-based playing as a kid is that, in my case anyway, I had to throw it all out the window and start again from scratch. So I don't think it's "harmless", so to speak.

    Anyway, I was pleasantly surprised by the Django tune, however - can't imagine many other rockers getting close to that.
    I suppose that if all you've really listened to is FCA, then you probably don't hear it, other than maybe the octaves he plays that are interspersed throughout the album, like in "Jumpin' Jack Flash" (although the studio version on his album "Wind Of Change", is a much better representation of his style) and his first lead break in "Do You Feel Like We Do". That being the case, you should really give him a chance and take a listen to some of the other stuff he's done over the years. Going back a little further, there's his arpeggiated intro to "I Walk On Gilded Splinters" from "Humble Pie Performance Rockin' The Fillmore" album. Although this was a cover, it's certainly not a normal chord progression that you hear in a typical rock song. The other thing that made him different is that he frequently and I mean a lot, used/uses his neck pickup for soloing, unlike other players that would use the bridge pickup.

    This is a good interview and worth watching in it's entirety (which I wouldn't expect you to have to do), but if you FFW to around 13:45 up to around 20:15, he discusses his playing style and his influences, particularly, KB.



    Don't get me wrong, he doesn't, nor do I, profess that he is a jazz guitarist, but during his formative years, he gravitated towards jazz instead of blues and consequently, developed his own style. Which to me at least, was and is different from his contemporaries.



  23. #22

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    If FCA refers to the "comes alive" album released in 1976 (wiki), there had been a whole wealth of music that was a long way from "normal chord progressions that you hear in a typical rock song" during the previous 5 years or so. I was pretty pissed off at the demise of prog rock, I can tell you, even though still a teen!

    I would say the Burrell lick he played in the video is in blues-jazz common territory (sounds jazzy if you're playing blues, bluesy if you're playing jazz), so his jazz influence is "subtle", let's say. Ever heard of Jan Akkerman?

  24. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Peter C
    If FCA refers to the "comes alive" album released in 1976 (wiki), there had been a whole wealth of music that was a long way from "normal chord progressions that you hear in a typical rock song" during the previous 5 years or so. I was pretty pissed off at the demise of prog rock, I can tell you, even though still a teen!

    I would say the Burrell lick he played in the video is in blues-jazz common territory (sounds jazzy if you're playing blues, bluesy if you're playing jazz), so his jazz influence is "subtle", let's say. Ever heard of Jan Akkerman?
    Yes, that's what I was referring to. Most (not all) that have heard of PF, have only heard that album, or the subsequent couple of albums of his the honestly weren't his best, which he freely admits.

    KB is a bluesy jazz player, more so than others.

    I'm old enough to have been around when Focus made a name for themselves in the U.S, so yes, I have heard of Jan Akkerman and he happens to be one of my favorite players as well. I'm also old enough to have been around during the advent of "Prog Rock", which I still listen to today, with groups like King Crimson, Gentle Giant, Yes, etc. I will admit, that I don't listen to the radio, or much new music at all. I'm quite content listening to the music of the '60s/'70s, which I grew up on, including the genres we've discussed, along with "Fusion".



  25. #24

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    OK man Cool chat.

  26. #25