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    Jaco Pastorius - Toppermost


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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
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    Nice article!

    My only quibble is that I have read that Monk Montgomery introduced the electric bass (Fender P-bass came out in 1951) in the early 50's to Lionel Hampton's band, and his predecessor Roy Johnson reportedly played e-bass with the group as well.

    First electric bass in jazz | TalkBass.com

    Also regarding rock music, Entwhistle arguably owns some of the most recognizable bass solo riffs in rock music, but I don't know if there were others out there soloing before him. Jack Bruce was playing electric bass with the Graham Bond band about the time The Who came out with My Generation (played with John McLaughlin in that group as well, but apparently John left before Bruce switched to electric.)

    Anyway, minor points. There are very few musicians who single-handedly change the course of their instrument, but Jaco was one of them.

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    Thanks for that. I tried and think fell short of making the argument that Jaco was the first to really make the bass a prominent instrument. Most jazzers before then, even if they played electric, saw the double bass as the 'proper' instrument.

    As for entwhistle, while it’s possible that there’s a record before with a bona fide bass solo on it, no one has seemed to be able to point to it. While jack played a lead bass, it was not until cream that came out, and even then, as much as I love jack (I even did a topper-most on him) Jaco was an advancement in technique. Someone with a better knowledge than I might make a comparison between Eric 'god' Clapton and Hendrix.

    I’m so glad though you read it, enjoyed it and built on it. Thank you!


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    Quote Originally Posted by dlew919
    Thanks for that. I tried and think fell short of making the argument that Jaco was the first to really make the bass a prominent instrument. Most jazzers before then, even if they played electric, saw the double bass as the 'proper' instrument.

    As for entwhistle, while it’s possible that there’s a record before with a bona fide bass solo on it, no one has seemed to be able to point to it. While jack played a lead bass, it was not until cream that came out, and even then, as much as I love jack (I even did a topper-most on him) Jaco was an advancement in technique. Someone with a better knowledge than I might make a comparison between Eric 'god' Clapton and Hendrix.

    I’m so glad though you read it, enjoyed it and built on it. Thank you!


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    Well Jaco certainly set the mold for jazz, and McCartney, Entwhistle and Bruce for rock. (McCartney mentions being highly influenced by James Jamerson as well.)

    I am also reminded that Stanley Clarke started recording with the electric bass at least as early as 1972. He says that Jaco and Victor Wooten among others were a step ahead of him in technique.

    I think the tone Bruce got out of his Fender Bass VI and Gibson EB-3 was superlative and highly influential--early accolytes Tim Bogart and Felix Cappalardi, then later Chris Squire and Geddy Lee. I was listening to a Rush song yesterday and marveling at the sound that Geddy got out of his Rickenbacker.

    Sometimes there's nothing better than a good old overdriven but clear bass line in a song to get the feet tapping.