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  1. #1

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    I know it's a stupid title, but who would you consider the next player in Jim's realm of musicality. Big shoes. I admire the musicality and technique of so many of the younger guys. Bill Frisell probably come close for me.

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  3. #2

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    frisell's love of jim hall is well documented...however i don't think he's that similar stylistically...

    my vote goes to brad shepik...who like hall, had his own unique style on his early recordings...but with time became more a student of jazz guitar in general...

    i've always heard a direct link from hall to john abercrombie to shepik

    poor video quality but fine playing



    cheers

  4. #3

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    I really see Peter Bernstein as someone that follows Jim Hall’s ethos, in terms of phrasing and general musicality, as well as his respect for the melody as the starting point for everything.


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  5. #4

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    Also Peter studied with Jim. Also Bill, I think?

  6. #5

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    Yes, both of them. And the way Peter teaches is definitely influenced by Jim Hall. I recognise this because my mentor, Gabriel Rosales, also studied with Hall and the way both approach teaching is very similar.


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  7. #6

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    Peter is over 50 and Bill is almost 70. Shouldn't we be asking who are the next Peter or Bill?

  8. #7

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    Seems like Lage Lund is in the same realm to me

  9. #8

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    It may be difficult for anyone to "follow in the footsteps" of Jim Hall or to be the "next Jim Hall." Think about the breadth of his career- playing with Chico Hamilton, Jimmy Giuffre, Paul Desmond, Sonny Rollins, Art Farmer, Bill Evans, Ron Carter, his own solo/leader career, etc. In interviews, he makes it clear that from each of those experiences he carried something formative with him as he progressed through his career. What opportunities! He was quietly a giant among giants throughout his career; the opportunity for that seems so much smaller now compared to then. As a result, I am not sure that modern day jazz musicians have the same opportunities to develop their art, although the changes in formal education and jazz pedagogy are considerable and may make up for some of that.

    Wow, Bill F. is almost 70?!? Wait, I'm over 60?!? I guess I'm not gonna be the next Jim Hall like I planned... And not only being over 50 but also have been prominent in jazz guitar for close to 30 years, Pete is superbly established. I'll be interested to hear the choices of forum members- I don't know that I can pick one. Gilad Hekselman, maybe.

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cunamara
    It may be difficult for anyone to "follow in the footsteps" of Jim Hall or to be the "next Jim Hall." Think about the breadth of his career...I am not sure that modern day jazz musicians have the same opportunities to develop their art, although the changes in formal education and jazz pedagogy are considerable and may make up for some of that.
    You put your finger on something there...if the question is "who will have the same kind of long, celebrated career with many stages, from apprentice to living legend, having a later career renaissance with all kinds of interesting collaborations and projects...." then the answer seems to be the obvious "next generation" of famous Hall accolytes--Scofield, Frisell, Metheny...

    If the question is more narrowly "who will be the Zoot Sims to Jim Hall's Lester Young?" (or the Sonny Stitt to his Charlie Parker, etc.), I'd agree with some of the names already given (like Bernstein), though I don't see Hall having as coherent a school of followers. He's not really like an Armstrong, Lester, Bird, or Bud. He seems more like someone like Sonny Rollins, whose influence is in a lot of places, but who doesn't inspire as many people to build their entire style around his. For those players who inspire clones (however talented--I love Zoot Sims, for instance), the offspring tend to show up 10-15 years after the parent style makes a big splash. Seems like Hall's would have shown up around 1975-1990 (and you might argue that Bernstein was just such a figure, but I'm not sure). That was exactly when fusion was upending everything, and jazz in general was pivoting hard and quickly, at least among the younger players.

  11. #10

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    Mary Halvorson.

  12. #11

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    I disagree with 44lombard. I think his influence is so pervasive as to go unnoticed.

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Litterick
    Mary Halvorson.
    They are so far apart stylistically, melodically, and compositionally that for the life of me I can't see the connection. (Big JH fan, not at all an MH fan).

  14. #13

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    Yes. The next Jim Hall will be quite unlike Jim Hall.

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    I disagree with 44lombard. I think his influence is so pervasive as to go unnoticed.
    I don't disagree with this --his influence is everywhere. I was trying to sort of dance around the idea of the "clone", the follower of a trailblazer who really sticks close to the language or sound of the trailblazer. It seems a little late to be asking who the next Hall will be in that more narrow sense. The window has closed...it's hard to imagine a major-league younger player who could escape all the influences of the last 40 years of jazz guitar and really just play in a 60s/70s "Jim Hall bag".

    I'd actually love it if there were such a player, as I never get tired of "Live!" and the Desmond / Rollins / Art Farmer records that showcase Hall. Also, for me, a big part of Hall is his relationship to lyrical jazz standards (even though Hall recorded them less and less in the last phase of his career). Would "the next Jim Hall" really be "the next Jim Hall" if she or he were more like Scofield or Metheny, only very occasionally recording stuff from the great American songbook?