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  1. #1

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    Studio or live...I saw a tour with Wayne Krantz...some amazing guitar work. But over the years, these guys worked with the best N.Y (Steve Khan also comes to mind) L.A. ( won't even start) Some amazing solos from over the years...Then there's the guys who didn't make the final cut...would love to here some of those outtakes...

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  3. #2

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    My favorites: Elliott Randall on "Reelin' In The Years" and Larry Carlton on "Kid Charlemagne."




  4. #3

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  5. #4

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    Skunk Baxter.

    Trivia: "Daddy G" is G. Gordon Liddy.

  6. #5

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    the correct answer is Drew Zingggggg


  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzgtrl4
    the correct answer is Drew Zingggggg

    Oddly, this concert came up as a youtube suggestion last week after I viewed some EVH clip that was posted here, and I gotta say, DZ is indeed layin' it down ... this clip is worth checking out just for the instrumental arrangement of three hits as a segue that opens the show, but you'll stay for all the stellar guitar work that DZ unwinds.

    It's kinda cool to see how the band and the arrangements have evolved over the... DECADES!!!... you can't keep doing the arrangement that's on the record for 30 years, ya know? The horn arrangements and other little stylistic surprises in this show are a treat.

    As for the "best" SD guitar solos, there are too many options...! I can't think of many that I don't like.

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by jaco
    would love to here some of those outtakes...
    Check out "The Making of Aja" for a handful of Peg solos that were rejected, followed by the keeper from Jay Graydon. It was on Amazon Prime recently; IDK if it's still available there now.

  9. #8

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    There's no doubt that Larry Carlton's solo on Kid C. is a work of rock perfection, but some people think he also did the solo on "Aja". It was actually done by Denny Dias, and is my fave SD guitar solo.

  10. #9

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    Funny that name Elliot Randall comes from nowhere. I wonder why his name doesn't get mentioned much anywhere.
    Regardless ditto a seriously good solo and fun song.
    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    My favorites: Elliott Randall on "Reelin' In The Years" and Larry Carlton on "Kid Charlemagne."




  11. #10

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    Not so long ago, YouTube recommended I watch The Making of Aja, in Japanese.

  12. #11

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    Very cool thread. There's so many, but this one by Denny Dias always got me:





    And then there's this, an "early mix," where you can hear someone say (maybe Fagen?) just before the solo, "Now let me hear the guitar solo." And then after, "Wow, holy fuck that's great!"



  13. #12

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    Did somebody mention 'i got the news'?
    i allways loved that solo. Starts at 2:20, but you can't really enjoy it without listening to the whole song.


  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by starjasmine
    Oddly, this concert came up as a youtube suggestion last week after I viewed some EVH clip that was posted here, and I gotta say, DZ is indeed layin' it down ...
    He is. Great stuff.

    When Walter Becker is introducing the sax players, he introduces a talented Chris Potter! What is it with this band. Everybody wants to play with them.

  15. #14

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    So many great guitar solos. Randall's "Reelin'" solo gut-punched me when it came out. I even momentarily thought about putting a humbucker on my Stratocaster...like Elliott's...after I figured out who did the solo and bought the solo album Elliott Randall's New York. (Didn't do it though.)

    And, of course, "Kid Charlemagne" was simply superb.

    I am in complete agreement with Mark Rhodes.

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by arielcee
    Funny that name Elliot Randall comes from nowhere. I wonder why his name doesn't get mentioned much anywhere.
    Regardless ditto a seriously good solo and fun song.
    I've read the band wanted him to join but he declined. He was busy with studio work. When Elliott was young, he took lessons from Sal Salvador. (Wrote an intro for one of Sal's technique books.) Obviously learned his way around the guitar. Another thing about that solo---it wasn't the first take. The first take was better but there was a problem with the recording, so Elliott had to "do it again."

  17. #16

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    Always love Jeff "Skunk" Baxter's solo on "My Old School." (Denny Dias is superb on this cut too.)


  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by arielcee
    Funny that name Elliot Randall comes from nowhere. I wonder why his name doesn't get mentioned much anywhere.
    Regardless ditto a seriously good solo and fun song.
    Elliott Randall mostly did studio work. A lot of that was uncredited pop records in the 70s. Then in the 80s he shifted mainly into jingles, and eventually midi and music technology consulting and moved to England. So between there not really being such a thing as the record business anymore and him drifting away from what's left of it his name has become less well known. But for a long time he was as well known as, say, Skunk Baxter, Dean Parks, Waddie Wachtel, Georg Wadenius, etc. He's on a ton of records (and TV commercials), so you've most likely heard his playing a lot without realizing it.

    John

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by JazzPadd

    And then after, "Wow, holy fuck that's great!"
    And it is. This is indeed one of the finest around.

  20. #19

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    There albums are full of brilliant guitar work. A couple which imo arent mentioned enough

    and the Carlton solo nobody mention

  21. #20

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    Average Joe, I just copied the link to post Third World Man and then saw your post... Good choice.

  22. #21

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    Always loved this bluesy take---was this Larry Carlton's first appearance on an SD record?


  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by JazzPadd
    Very cool thread. There's so many, but this one by Denny Dias always got me:





    And then there's this, an "early mix," where you can hear someone say (maybe Fagen?) just before the solo, "Now let me hear the guitar solo." And then after, "Wow, holy fuck that's great!"


    That's a good song, but it's one of the the few SD songs where the guitar solo was better than the song.
    I mentioned in another thread that DD studied with Billy Bauer, and was probably the only true jazz guitarist SD used.He went on to play with some actual jazz musicians, and then became a software engineer.
    I think he played with Gene Harris.

  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marcel_A
    And it is. This is indeed one of the finest around.
    I'm not sure, but I think it sounded like Becker saying that. I could be wrong...

  25. #24

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    I was listening to Dias' "Do It Again" sitar solo yesterday and thinking 'the only person I can imagine playing an organ solo after that and not looking pale in comparison is John Medeski.' I like Fagen's organ solo--it's embedded deep into my brain and is kind of musical comfort food to me, but Dias' solo is so funky/nasty and in a way seems to look forward to some of the "downtown" music of the 1990s and beyond.

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by arielcee
    Funny that name Elliot Randall comes from nowhere. I wonder why his name doesn't get mentioned much anywhere.
    Regardless ditto a seriously good solo and fun song.
    He is everywhere. He is funny. I know him on Facebook.

    He had a band, Randall’s Island:


  27. #26

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    SD is a very unique space in "Pop" music...not a rock group and not a jazz group..yet appealed to both camps in some ways
    they had some of the top studio and live performance players on their albums..and considering that many their songs were
    obscure in their story line and the use of many unique chords in the progressions ..they made it work into a very successful
    "band"

    We have to remember the guitarists (and all the solo players) created their work on the spot..they didnt have any idea what Fagen/Becker
    wanted and so it seems they didn't either before the fact..Jay Graydon said he didnt know if they liked his solo on Peg..until he heard it on the radio

    I would think if you have never heard a tune and you are then asked to play a solo and not get any feedback..your BP might spike a bit if there is a second or more takes

    we hear stories of how they tried six or seven players before they "thought" of asking Larry Carlton to play

    so for me all the players they used are in the A team league ..they had Wayne Shorter on some tracks..it dosent get any better !!

  28. #27

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  29. #28

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    Denny Dias and Elliott Randall join forces on "Green Earrings"


  30. #29

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    Dean Parks... "ou know what he told me? He has never used a talk box in his life! He said the he recorded that guitar part straight into the board and Walter Becker added the talk box effect after!! He also said he preferred the original clean track. "

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iWYchJI0Cv8


  31. #30

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    When I was at GIT in 1984, Larry Carlton came in one afternoon to do a lesson seminar thing. An hour or two on stage in one of the smaller performance stage rooms. Let everyone check out his small pedal board. I remember some TC electronics gear. They were pretty new at the time. And a ProCo RAT. I walked down Hollywood Blvd and bought one on my way home. (Still have it!)

    (That was one of the perks of GIT. They would recruit great players to come in and do a quickie talk or lesson. Steve Morse came in one time too. And of course Howard Roberts would come in every few weeks for his seminars, which were beyond brilliant.)

    Larry passed out copies of his lead sheet for one of the big hits--I think it was Josie. Fat chance I could ever find it in my files, but if I do I'll post it here. Walked everybody through the changes and parts.

    It was pretty stunning to watch him up close. Such great control on deep sustained bends and slides. I always knew that guy was great, but up close like that was something to see. And hear.
    Last edited by Flat; 10-19-2020 at 01:33 PM.

  32. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by fep
    Dean Parks... "ou know what he told me? He has never used a talk box in his life! He said the he recorded that guitar part straight into the board and Walter Becker added the talk box effect after!! He also said he preferred the original clean track. "
    Hard for me to imagine what that would sound like. Wonder where Becker got the idea to use a talk box on that track....I didn't know that one could (back then) add such an effect after a part was recorded. (What would that involve, anyway?)

  33. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    Hard for me to imagine what that would sound like. Wonder where Becker got the idea to use a talk box on that track....I didn't know that one could (back then) add such an effect after a part was recorded. (What would that involve, anyway?)
    the late 60's was a time of sound experimentation in the studio and if you were under a label and didnt have to worry about time/money..you could play your guitar parts backward (Beatles Hendrix and others) or use a very high tech
    effect..the Kazoo (Hendrix/Cross Town Traffic)..consider how much time SD spent on sweetening the tracks..mixing and re-mix..Im sure some of the "hard to satisify" stories are true..I have met some players that even disliked Perfect..?

  34. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzgtrl4
    the correct answer is Drew Zingggggg

    That is indeed a very good show. I saw them about the same time...don’t remember the guitarist, though. Donald reminds me of Count Basie, perhaps with Walter his Billy Strayhorn.

    I didn’t watch the whole thing, but the Boddhisatva solos are outstanding. Just a thought that Drew could have used a little more dirt in his tone, which was one thing I thought the SD guitarists like Skunk and Denny and Larry always had going for them.

    Also, Becker acquits himself very well—must be hard to play alongside some of the hired guns SD has used over the years. He is underappreciated as an instrumentalist, and probably could have been the center of a lot of bands if he had gone that route. (Not that I like his solo stuff that much, but I think he would work well in the small group format.)

  35. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by wolflen
    ..consider how much time SD spent on sweetening the tracks..mixing and re-mix..Im sure some of the "hard to satisify" stories are true..I have met some players that even disliked Perfect..?
    I understand the time. But back in the mid-'70s, I don't know how an analog talk-box signal could be added to guitar track after the track was laid down. I don't doubt it happened. I'm wondering HOW. Mind you, my knowledge of recording techniques is limited. But if Becker added a talk-box to the guitar track Dean Parks laid down without one, I'm wondering how he did it.

  36. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    I understand the time. But back in the mid-'70s, I don't know how an analog talk-box signal could be added to guitar track after the track was laid down. I don't doubt it happened. I'm wondering HOW. Mind you, my knowledge of recording techniques is limited. But if Becker added a talk-box to the guitar track Dean Parks laid down without one, I'm wondering how he did it.
    If it's true that he recorded direct into the board from the guitar...

    There is a technique that's been around for a long time called reamping. You send the direct recorded track out, use a reamp box to get the impedance correct, send it through a mic'd amp and record another track of the reamped signal. You can also send it through pedals or anything else you'd do with a guitar signal.

    In the Haitian Divorce example, you'd need to really memorize the guitar track so as to move your mouth correctly when doing the talk box.

    Just in case someone wants to change an amp or amp settings after recording... Guitar to direct box which splits the signal, one going to the mic'd amp another direct to the mixing board, records to two tracks. Didn't like the Fender amp, let's reamp it and see how it sounds with a Marshal (no need for the guitarist to play it again). If you're willing to dive way into the details like Steely Dan, you can spend a lot of time doing these kind of things.
    Attached Images Attached Images Best Steely Dan Guitar Solos-reamp-png 

  37. #36

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    I have, by coincidence, spent most of the afternoon with Steely Dan music on in the background. I have always thought that if one was to come up with a "10 best guitar solos of all time by different guitarists" there could easily be five or six SD songs in there.

    For me, I would say that my favourites are Jay Graydon on Peg, and Skunk Baxter on Rikki Don't Lose That Number and on My Old School.

    That isn't to take anything away from the other players or solos at all, and I always feel slightly guilty that I don't include Kid Charlemagne in the top three, and it certainly is a brilliant solo.

  38. #37
    I liked them better before they came out with GODWACKER I will REPAY HE SAYS !!!

  39. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve burchfield
    I liked them better before they came out with GODWACKER I will REPAY HE SAYS !!!
    I like that track - it's yet another one of those blues with a bridge things thery did so well. The rythm guitar is a lot of fun to play w a band, and on the record the whole band is funky. And it's one of the tracks where Becker's late era lead playing actually works.

    In hindsight I think EMG was underappreciated as an album. It feels a bit more organic, like an actual band, compared to 2AN. The same could be said for Sunken Condoes vs Morph the Cat

  40. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by dazzaman
    I have, by coincidence, spent most of the afternoon with Steely Dan music on in the background. I have always thought that if one was to come up with a "10 best guitar solos of all time by different guitarists" there could easily be five or six SD songs in there.

    For me, I would say that my favourites are Jay Graydon on Peg, and Skunk Baxter on Rikki Don't Lose That Number and on My Old School.

    That isn't to take anything away from the other players or solos at all, and I always feel slightly guilty that I don't include Kid Charlemagne in the top three, and it certainly is a brilliant solo.
    By coincidence a couple of Sirius stations have been playing My Old School a lot lately. Off the charts brilliant soloing—I think it’s just Skunk on lead? He pulls out all his tricks there. Just when you think he can’t throw anything else at you, he does. It’s like a clinic for rock guitar lead playing. The fadeout might have the best lick in the song.

    He sure played a lot back in the day. It’s too bad his talents were underused with the Doobies. They could have really benefited from letting the guitarists stretch out more.