Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Posts 1 to 26 of 26
  1. #1

    User Info Menu

    I've been listening to a fair amount of Steve Cardenas and Adam Rogers lately. I'm interesting in your favorite jazz albums that are primarily recorded on a 335 (or 335/345 like guitar). Of course, there is Grant Green's fantastic body of ES-330 recordings, as well as Emily Remler's. There are also all the great Larry Carlton and Lee Ritenour recordings from the 70s and 80s.

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

    User Info Menu

    The first few Scofield albums feature his 335. Love his sound on both Rough House and Shinola/Out Like A Light

  4. #3

    User Info Menu

    I love everyone you have named above. I also have really been digging Charles Altura's playing lately. Lots of stuff on youtube of him playing with Chick Corea and Tom Harrell. Some others:

    - Any and all Sco
    - Reiner Baas
    - Dan Wilson on his Benedetto 335
    - Dave Stryker
    - Not their primary guitars by any means, but there are some videos out there of Kurt Rosenwinkel and Mike Moreno on 335's

  5. #4

    User Info Menu

    Cardenas and Rogers are wonderful!

    Everything by Steve Khan!

  6. #5

    User Info Menu


  7. #6

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by jameslovestal
    How could I have forgotten Dave Stryker..One of my favorites (and one of the nicest guys in jazz)!

  8. #7

    User Info Menu

    An ES 330, actually:


  9. #8

    User Info Menu

    And early Kurt:


  10. #9

    User Info Menu

    Ted Quinlan (Toronto)


  11. #10

    User Info Menu

    mclaughlins 345...he took off stop tailpiece and added bigsby b-12


    from maha's site-
    1976 Gibson 345 with Bigsby
    This is one of my all time favorite guitars that I bought in 1978.This instrument has been modified with a scalloped fingerboard and of course the Bigsby. I played this guitar in the One Truth Band.





    cheers

    ps- notice mini hum in neck position

  12. #11

    User Info Menu

    I dig Adam Rogers - "Sight."

    Not an album per se, but a great set:

  13. #12

    User Info Menu

    [QUOTE=jameslovestal;1063903[/QUOTE]

    great comping..very smooth chords..love the 'organ/guitar trio..a la jimmy smith/kenny burrell..

  14. #13

    User Info Menu

    I’m not sure what he use on his albums, but Pete McCann get some nice sounds from that 335 live
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=...;v=86votSSNM-0

  15. #14

    User Info Menu

    May not be a household name but german jazz guitarist Volker Kriegel used an ES335 most of the time.

  16. #15

    User Info Menu

    Some really great suggestions here!

  17. #16

    User Info Menu

    I don't have any. Not a fan of the 335 in jazz. I don't find the Quinlan or Stryker tones above appealing at all...too bland.

    I was going to say that Emily's tone sounds quite different and surprisingly good, but now I see it's an ES-330...this confirms my negative view on the 335 in jazz. Just too bland without effects (and I'm not into effects).

  18. #17

    User Info Menu

    Ditto!

  19. #18

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Average Joe
    The first few Scofield albums feature his 335. Love his sound on both Rough House and Shinola/Out Like A Light
    Rough House is the best. I never heard such before (I was lucky to had my teacher mentioning it to me just after it came out)
    That album is sssooo underrated, btw Hal Garper and Nussbaum also did they contribution.

    I did not know it was a 335, thx for the information, this helps me appretiate Gibson 335.

  20. #19

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by marcwhy
    And early Kurt:

    Another underrated early album. I Love this album. I did my check and it seems Rosenwinkel started to use 335 later, this album he seems to be playing on a Yamaha. Later he plays the new D'Angelico semihollows, which brand got many criticism. Both this example both Scofield's tends to believe me that the sound is more like in the hand.

    (of course this does not stop me to look elsewhere, and try new guitars and amps, because it is surely not in my hand so it must be elsewhere :-)

  21. #20

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by arielcee
    I dig Adam Rogers - "Sight."

    Not an album per se, but a great set:
    Sco is great but...
    c'mon, Ibanez John Scofield signature models does not count as Gibson 335... if it would then every standard double cutaway thin hollowbody would count.

  22. #21

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Gabor
    Sco is great but...
    c'mon, Ibanez John Scofield signature models does not count as Gibson 335... if it would then every standard double cutaway thin hollowbody would count.
    Are we talking about music or guitar mysticism? As far as what seems to be important in my mind is: it's a well made 16" doublecut, thinline, semi-hollow, 24.75" scale electric guitar with humbuckers played by a "jazz" guy. I mean call me crazy but that seems a little bit more important, in my judgment, than whether some marking on there says "GIBSON" or es-335.

  23. #22

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by arielcee
    Are we talking about music or guitar mysticism? As far as what seems to be important in my mind is: it's a well made 16" doublecut, thinline, semi-hollow, 24.75" scale electric guitar with humbuckers played by a "jazz" guy. I mean call me crazy but that seems a little bit more important, in my judgment, than whether some marking on there says "GIBSON" or es-335.
    \

    Actually, Scofield got is first Ibanez AS-200 in 1981. Before that, he played a 335. Therefore, my guess is that those songs on first few albums from '77 - '80 where we hear a semi-hollow (including Rough House) was his 335.

  24. #23

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by SkipBurz
    \

    Actually, Scofield got is first Ibanez AS-200 in 1981. Before that, he played a 335. Therefore, my guess is that those songs on first few albums from '77 - '80 where we hear a semi-hollow (including Rough House) was his 335.
    Up to and including Shinola/out like a light.

  25. #24

    User Info Menu

    John Scofield can be seen with his dot neck 335 on the sleeve of "Who's Who"
    Can somebody confirm that he was using it in the famous Carnegie Hall concert with Chet Baker and Gerry Mulligan ?

  26. #25

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by JFranck
    John Scofield can be seen with his dot neck 335 on the sleeve of "Who's Who"
    Can somebody confirm that he was using it in the famous Carnegie Hall concert with Chet Baker and Gerry Mulligan ?
    Man, I love that album! Concerning, Scofield's guitar, it's pretty well documented in interviews that he got his first AS200 in '81 or '82 when he was in Japan touring with the trumpet player Terumasa Hino. He was having some issues with his 335, when Ibanez showed up with an AS200 for him to try out (which Ibanez introduced in 1979). Therefore, the Mulligan/Baker concert recorded in 1974, would have been too early for the AS200. Those details aside, when you listen to his solo at around 4:20, it sure does sound like a 335 and not an AS200.

  27. #26
    As far as changing music forever though not just tone I would think BB Kings 355. The room 335 Larry Carlton Album. Most working guitar players when I grew up had Gibson Stereo or 355 and a Super Reverb. On the back of Hang on Sloopy The Mccoys with Rick Derringer had a 355 and a Super Reverb. When I was a teenager Isaw Mitch Ryder and the Detroit Wheels and their guitar player had a Gibson Byrdland and a twin Reverb, which Ted Nugent also had , so I guess in Detroit a Byrdland and a twin were the thing. Was there a certain choice in your area that your local heroes played when you were starting out? I guess a Gibson guitar and a Fender amp stands the test of time. When I was really little I got to see Les Paul and Mary Ford at the Livestock Show and could not figure out the layers of sound. I also saw Roy Clark who Pat Matheny recently thanked on his website for giving him a start at the Starlight theater in KC.MO. The first jazz guys I saw used Gibson L5 or Super 400 with Standel amp sometimes. So what did your local influencers get you to start with is my question?