Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234
Posts 151 to 169 of 169
  1. #151

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by greveost
    I remember reading, MANY years ago, that they used to play in their backyard, meanwhile they also used to have these huge BBQ-parties, where the whole neighborhood was invited.

    Did you ever see that, visited the parties, if so how was it? Was it even true?
    There are a few videos posted on youtube:


  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #152

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by lammie200
    There are a few videos posted on youtube:
    Ah thanks man, didn't know these clips existed!

    But as I understand it, these events also took place before they were famous, I mean, that they had manage to built a reputation purely off of these local neighborhood party events, and that is how they were discovered. I might have gotten that wrong though.

  4. #153

    User Info Menu

    They played every gig they could including bars, backyards and bar mitzvahs. They drew flyers, printed them and posted them up around town. There was a lot of legwork involved.


    I just read Noel Monk's book about being their manager for seven years. I don't know how much to actually take at face value; he's pretty selfcongratulatory throughout the book. However, apparently at the first meeting with he and the record label they arrived 30 minutes late. They were out of breath, red, sweating and apparently had run several miles to get to the meeting after their car broke down. They knew the value of hustling.

  5. #154

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Cunamara
    They played every gig they could including bars, backyards and bar mitzvahs. They drew flyers, printed them and posted them up around town. There was a lot of legwork involved.
    Yeah, I think this is pretty much what all rock/hardrock bands were doing back then. Except for maybe playing concerts in the backyard on a regular basis.



    fep, are you there? What was your experience growing up in their neighborhood, or nearby?

  6. #155

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave70
    My fav interview:

    Just watched this and it was wonderful with an excellent interviewer.

    By the time EVH came around, I had mostly stopped listening to rock except for earlier stuff. Only in the past few years did I really listen (watch) him on youtube. Besides his brilliant and innovative playing (and tinkering), one thing that struck me was the pure joy that he always radiated when playing. The interview mentioned earlier really added a dimension for Eddie, a sometimes self-deprecating musician that exudes humility regardless of his status at the top of the pantheon of rock with few others, as well as a great love of family.

  7. #156

    User Info Menu

    Eddie mentions this as the song that made him want to play drums.


  8. #157

    User Info Menu

    A closer look at "Jump" from Rick Beato


  9. #158
    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    As said elsewhere, the thing about Eddie is that he was a brilliant, very flashy and highly individual rock and roll guitar player who liked to write and play songs in a BAND.

    Do we see many of those these days?

    Already when I was learning, the rock players I was hearing weren't influenced by EVH, but more hearkening back to the 60s and 70s, excepting maybe Tom Morello (who I regard as EVH's spiritual successor on the instrument.)

    Back then even if you could puzzle it out, you simply couldn't do the EVH stuff in public....that and the snapping of my cheap vibrato arm put paid to any direct influence... if you wanted new 'wanky' guitar playing you had to go to special guitar oriented albums like Passion and Warfare (and carry them around in a brown paper bag hoping none of your indie mates would see), or to metal.

    Above all EVH represents for me the very individual approach to learning the instrument people had back then, teaching oneself, peicing it together, coming up with ones own approach. As a teacher having to take students through syllabuses and the grades etc, I do wonder if we are squishing the creativity out of guitar playing. The 'shred' thing seems to do that to me, producing players who can 'do it all' but invent nothing new the way Eddie did, and without any of that connection to popular culture.
    Ha. I had Passion an warfare. Tried to like some of it, but alas... Really liked some of Satriani, Nuno and Eric Johnson stuff. There was some actual music in there, but Van Halen was just in a different category. What he was doing never sounded like "tricks thrown in" the way that they often did with some of his followers. I don't know how he did it honestly.

    He always talked thinking that the instrumental tracks should be able to stand alone. I think he achieved that. I definitely liked the Hagar era mostly in spite of the vocals, especially the awful lyrics. A few good ballads, but mostly awful. My appreciation for both eras probably has to do with the fact that each singer sets off the Eddie's instrumental in unique ways. It's hard to go back and listen, but he was such a great musician. His technical artistry always served the music in a way which was hard for others to reproduce.

  10. #159

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Cunamara
    They played every gig they could including bars, backyards and bar mitzvahs. They drew flyers, printed them and posted them up around town. There was a lot of legwork involved.


    I just read Noel Monk's book about being their manager for seven years. I don't know how much to actually take at face value; he's pretty selfcongratulatory throughout the book. However, apparently at the first meeting with he and the record label they arrived 30 minutes late. They were out of breath, red, sweating and apparently had run several miles to get to the meeting after their car broke down. They knew the value of hustling.
    I kind of get the impression that they were among the hardest working rock bands that ever existed, and I really think you can hear that right from the first album. I think we get caught up sometimes in the "seriousness" of jazz, and it's hard for some of us to look at a rock band that wrote a song called "Hot for Teacher" as serious about what they did, but they were.

  11. #160

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont
    I kind of get the impression that they were among the hardest working rock bands that ever existed, and I really think you can hear that right from the first album. I think we get caught up sometimes in the "seriousness" of jazz, and it's hard for some of us to look at a rock band that wrote a song called "Hot for Teacher" as serious about what they did, but they were.
    Van Halen is as brilliant and original as Bill Evans, or Herbie...

  12. #161

    User Info Menu

    [QUOTE=mr. beaumont;1068368... it's hard for some of us to look at a rock band that wrote a song called "Hot for Teacher" as serious about what they did, but they were.[/QUOTE]

    The isolated guitar track of "Hot for Teacher." (The first 30 seconds or so are silent because the song doesn't start with guitar.) Then there's a clip of the whole band.





  13. #162

    User Info Menu



    A la Jeff Beck in the '80s.

  14. #163

    User Info Menu

    Ran across this Guitar Player article about the EVH guitar scale.

    How to Play the Eddie Van Halen Scale | GuitarPlayer

    "Learn the symmetrical, three-notes-per-string pattern that Ed frequently uses for both major and minor keys."

  15. #164

    User Info Menu




  16. #165

    User Info Menu

    Rick Beato on Eddie Van Halen's "Brown Sound."


  17. #166

    User Info Menu

    Makes you realise what a year 1978 was for guitar... debut Van Halen album, debut Dire Straits and debut UK album
    Those three albums are still my go to's if I want to listen to those particular guitarists, all amazing in their own way.

  18. #167

    User Info Menu

    Dire Straits made a huge impact on me and my friends back in ‘78. It was like Bob Dylan with crazy-mad guitar skills. Came out of nowhere really.

    As I recall Van Halen wasn’t nearly as popular until maybe the summer of ‘79. (We were always a little behind the times in Chattanooga.) By that time radio and pop music in general was rapidly balkanizing, and there was rock, New Wave, hair metal, the dregs of disco, and urban. Oh and prog, which was where I was at the time...soon to move into New Wave.

    At the time Van Halen seemed too hair metal for the tastes of me and my crew...the province of guys with curly mullets and platform shoes, and girls with spandex and big hair. (Yeah I know in retrospect sounds like a lot of fun, doesn’t it?) No denying the musicianship of course. But seeing DLR 24/7 on MTV got a little old to some of us.

    I was very keen on the first UK album. One of the big what ifs is if Holdsworth had stayed with that group. Bill Bruford might not have gone onto the new version of King Crimson (our loss for sure). Would have possibly worked out better for Holdsworth though.

  19. #168

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by sasquatch
    Makes you realise what a year 1978 was for guitar... debut Van Halen album, debut Dire Straits and debut UK album
    Those three albums are still my go to's if I want to listen to those particular guitarists, all amazing in their own way.
    I loved the first Dire Straits album. Saw them on their first US tour in Charlotte. When I got a Yamaha Strat from Japan (-my older brother was stationed there at the time and the dollar was strong) I chose the color red because of Knopfler's red Strat.

  20. #169

    User Info Menu

    I heard the first broadcast of the Sultans of Swing demo on Charlie Gillett’s Honky Tonk show in July 1977.

    Last edited by Litterick; 10-26-2020 at 07:07 AM.