1. #1

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    Enjoy!

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    One of my favourites!

  4. #3

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    Oh yeah....

  5. #4

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    In the late 80's word at a local cajun joint was that Harry Connick Jr. would drop by after his show in Toronto. Connick at that time was pretty popular at that point and I was impressed how he just comped letting the fantastic Russell Malone stretch out. A good time was had by all.

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by A. Kingstone
    In the late 80's word at a local cajun joint was that Harry Connick Jr. would drop by after his show in Toronto. Connick at that time was pretty popular at that point and I was impressed how he just comped letting the fantastic Russell Malone stretch out. A good time was had by all.
    Hi, A,
    Do you think the reason was that Harry couldn't cut the mustard improvisationally on the same level with Malone? IMO, Connick was a functional Boogie Woogie/Dixie pianist whose popularity was that he sounded like Frank Sinatra when he sang the standards. I've never heard him improvise to any great degree and I never liked his sound. However, he had some great bands/musicians behind him once he became famous.

    Play live! . . . Marinero

  7. #6

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    Could very well be. I just was glad to see he wasn't playing 'the star.'

    As I remember there were quite a few on the bandstand who could blow so Harry laid low.

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero
    Hi, A,
    Do you think the reason was that Harry couldn't cut the mustard improvisationally on the same level with Malone? IMO, Connick was a functional Boogie Woogie/Dixie pianist whose popularity was that he sounded like Frank Sinatra when he sang the standards.
    Harry is a high level, very Monk influenced pianist who has cut a number of great instrumental records. The two I know best are "Lofty's Roach Soufflé" (featuring Ben Wolfe on bass) and "The Other Hours". He's also a very good arranger who, at one point, wrote a big band arrangement every single day.




  9. #8

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    I heard Harry a few years ago ....
    and was Very Very impressed with his piano playing ....
    he could play authentically in many different styles of jazz amongst them
    he did a bangin stride thing , a Nat Cole thing ,
    and an incredible chopsy Oscar Peterson thing
    then he open his mouth sang like Frank !!
    (he was very good looking too)

    I never understood why he wasn’t an even
    bigger Star ....

  10. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by pcsanwald
    Harry is a high level, very Monk influenced pianist who has cut a number of great instrumental records. The two I know best are "Lofty's Roach Soufflé" (featuring Ben Wolfe on bass) and "The Other Hours". He's also a very good arranger who, at one point, wrote a big band arrangement every single day.




    Hi, P,
    Thanks for the response and the two music videos. I listened to them both and would say that Harry is a musician that never found his own voice. He sings like Sinatra and, in these recordings, he mimics Monk, poorly, with his piano playing. I believe the number one most important thing a musician must strive for after he's conquered technique is his/her own voice. . . because a musical instrument is a substitute for the human voice and if it cannot reflect your own unique personality, it fails. But, Harry's been a great success and has made a life in music and there's something to say for that but no one, in my opinion, is ever going to remember him as an innovator or a unique voice. However, this is just my opinion and I don't want my remarks to be taken as a personal attack(they are not) but merely expressing my personal tastes about music and performers.
    Many times in the past when I played with ensembles, I would hire a musician who, perhaps, didn't have the best technique, but had the best sound because I knew with practice the technique would eventually improve but a personal sound can remain illusive, if not attainable, to some, in a lifetime of playing. So, thanks again for the musical offerings and your perspective. Play live! . . . Marinero