1. #1

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    one of the great guitarists!!...never heard him? sure you have..it's the pseudonym used by none other than jimmy raney on al cohn's -mr. music -lp!



    and if raney, er, sir osberts not enough, billy bauer also appears


    Billy Bauer (# 4 & 5), Sir Osbert Haberdasher (pseudonym for Jimmy Raney, # 1, 2 & 6) - guitar....

    pianist sanford gold also plays some nice monk-esque solo's

    a good listen

    cheers
    Last edited by neatomic; 06-26-2020 at 05:54 PM. Reason: typo-

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  3. #2

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    p.s. Sanford Gold played piano on Johnny Smith's groundbreaking Moonlight In Vermont lp, was Smith's piano player before Bob Pancoast became his regular pianist. NA mentioned Bob in thread recently.

    last time I caught Cohn was poorly advertised concert by the late Fred Miles, jazz advocate and producer [did a couple Al and Zoot sessions]
    maybe 15 people in the place w/stellar rhythm section John Bunch, piano, Michael Moore, bass, Bobby Durham drums. Late in Al's career, he sat in a chair w/the tenor between his legs, but sounded better than ever.

  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon
    p.s. Sanford Gold played piano on Johnny Smith's groundbreaking Moonlight In Vermont lp, was Smith's piano player before Bob Pancoast became his regular pianist. NA mentioned Bob in thread recently.

    last time I caught Cohn was poorly advertised concert by the late Fred Miles, jazz advocate and producer [did a couple Al and Zoot sessions]
    maybe 15 people in the place w/stellar rhythm section John Bunch, piano, Michael Moore, bass, Bobby Durham drums. Late in Al's career, he sat in a chair w/the tenor between his legs, but sounded better than ever.
    Sanford was on the scene in NYC when things were really happening. He mainly taught and did studio work. A friend of mine studied with him for years, in fact he was the go-to-guy for jazz piano lessons back in the 60s and 70s. His once said to another one of his students I used to play with,
    "Rich, you never stop paying your dues", when he was complaining about making a living as a jazz musician.

  5. #4

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    nice to see the sanford gold appreciation!...

    bill evans was huge fan!!



    cheers

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    ps- al cohn also played some nice piano...mastery of instruments must run in the family...as his son joe cohn is not only an astounding guitarist, but plays acoustic bass and trumpet..and joes daughter, al's granddaughter, plays coronet for tuba skinny

    joe cohns and doug raneys -two funky people- recording ties it all together




    cheers

  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgcim
    Sanford was on the scene in NYC when things were really happening. He mainly taught and did studio work. A friend of mine studied with him for years, in fact he was the go-to-guy for jazz piano lessons back in the 60s and 70s. His once said to another one of his students I used to play with,
    "Rich, you never stop paying your dues", when he was complaining about making a living as a jazz musician.
    Evidently Sanford had a fondness for “the wacky stuff,” which isn’t unusual, but it did get him into a bit of trouble at NBC. Johnny Smith recalls a story about how he handpicked a group for a show that was being conducted by Meredith Wilson (who later wrote “The Music Man”). Smith chose Sanford as the piano player, who arrived at either the show or rehearsal quite stoned and couldn’t cut it. Livid, Wilson said to JS “I never want to see that piano player again.”

    John Galich

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    Quote Originally Posted by jmgalich
    Evidently Sanford had a fondness for “the wacky stuff,” which isn’t unusual, but it did get him into a bit of trouble at NBC. Johnny Smith recalls a story about how he handpicked a group for a show that was being conducted by Meredith Wilson (who later wrote “The Music Man”). Smith chose Sanford as the piano player, who arrived at either the show or rehearsal quite stoned and couldn’t cut it. Livid, Wilson said to JS “I never want to see that piano player again.”

    John Galich
    I've got to tell my friend who studied with SG that one! Thanks, JG!