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  1. #1

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    Nice short feature from "Guitar Player" magazine Randy Bachman: How I Wrote "American Woman" | GuitarPlayer

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    Nice short feature from "Guitar Player" magazine Randy Bachman: How I Wrote "American Woman" | GuitarPlayer
    Kinda incredible how bad music video production was back then....

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by lukmanohnz
    Kinda incredible how bad music video production was back then....
    looking through "tech" eyes/ears...makes one wonder what will it give us in 10/20 years + that will make todays offerings seem .. "bad"

    a line from the group Yacht..."...I thought the future would be cooler..I thought the brave world would be newer,,"

    tell someone in 1960 about the abilities of todays cell phone...and you would be locked up...

    considering the social climate in todays world...space travel does look appealing

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by lukmanohnz
    Kinda incredible how bad music video production was back then....
    I don’t know whatcha talkin’ about...

    Add some boats, some bikes and some horses and it’s all good!


  7. #6

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    Wonder if Bachman ever A/B’d his American Woman tone against Clapton’s Crying Woman tone? Or Santana’s Black Magic Woman tone?

    Anybody ever heard of a tone named for a guy? Me neither.

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by lukmanohnz
    Kinda incredible how bad music video production was back then....
    Every other kind of production – television, film, music – was much better back then.

    The article’s title made me think of The Fall’s How I Wrote Elastic Man.


  9. #8

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    What really got me was the band setup and camera angle that perfectly obscured the lead guitarist behind the bassist. Reminded me of the scene in That Thing You Do where the TV studio crew is trying to avoid close-ups of the recently-substituted bassist. Still one of my all-time favorite fictional band movies.

  10. #9

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    The lyrics to AW might have been a metaphor for something else, but I noticed a bunch of Guess Who songs that put down a woman in their lyrics. 'Undone' and the one with the line "She graduated from the school for losers".
    Might be a good PHD thesis topic.

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgcim
    The lyrics to AW might have been a metaphor for something else, but I noticed a bunch of Guess Who songs that put down a woman in their lyrics. 'Undone' and the one with the line "She graduated from the school for losers".
    Might be a good PHD thesis topic.
    or the Doors..20th Century Fox...it could be pro/anti woman..depending on how you view it..is she cool..or just a jerk...??

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by wolflen
    or the Doors..20th Century Fox...it could be pro/anti woman..depending on how you view it..is she cool..or just a jerk...??
    IMHO, she's cool, very cool
    This could turn out to be a whole sub-genre of rock music:
    Dylan- "Just Like a Woman", "Like A Rolling Stone", "Don't Think Twice, It's Alright"
    Beatles- "Run For Your Life" ( the ultimate misogynist song), "Day Tripper"
    Stones- "19th Nervous Breakdown", "Mother's Little Helper", "Under My Thumb", "Some Girls".
    Zeppelin- "She's Just a Woman",etc...

  13. #12

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    Sorry to be a wet blanket, but what an awful song! All I remember is the 'lyrics' being screamed---and that's enough...

  14. #13

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    While I sympathize with the song's antiwar lyrics, I generally dislike polemic songs and this one is no exception. The riff is pretty basic even for hard rock, and I'm an oddball who thinks that allegory only works when it isn't so obvious. You have an opinion. That's nice.

    The only song I've ever liked from the GW is "No Time". It too casts a woman in the role of antagonist (this time literally rather than metaphorically imo). Somebody was havin' a bad couple of years.

  15. #14

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    I have this dim recollection about Randy Bachman and Guitar Player, and maybe you oldtimers can correct me.

    Until about 50 years ago Guitar Player and its readers were mostly about jazz, and Bachman was one of the first rock guys to get a serious profile in the magazine. He was somewhat earnest and told the interviewer that he learned to play Chet Atkins songs note for note as part of learning to play guitar. The next month's letters to the editor were brutal, incredulous that he could play at that level "this guy can only play three chords, why is he in the magazine?" Soon there after rock players were regularly on the cover. Anyway, that's how I remember it.

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by nopedals
    I have this dim recollection about Randy Bachman and Guitar Player, and maybe you oldtimers can correct me.

    Until about 50 years ago Guitar Player and its readers were mostly about jazz, and Bachman was one of the first rock guys to get a serious profile in the magazine. He was somewhat earnest and told the interviewer that he learned to play Chet Atkins songs note for note as part of learning to play guitar. The next month's letters to the editor were brutal, incredulous that he could play at that level "this guy can only play three chords, why is he in the magazine?" Soon there after rock players were regularly on the cover. Anyway, that's how I remember it.
    I started reading GP in the fall of '69, IIRC. Either Leslie West or Jimi Hendrix was the cover story. My recollection of those early days, when Jim Crockett(sp?) was editor was that they covered everyone who played guitar- classical, flamenco, Jazz, blues, country, folk, rock, pop, whatever. What I do distinctly remember is that many of the jazz guys favorably spoke of Duane Allman's playing. The approach was very eclectic, and I read every issue cover-to-cover over and over until the copies disintegrated. By the time i stopped collecting the magazines, I had a three-foot tall stack moldering in the garage. I had to stop, the GAS was killing me.
    Last edited by citizenk74; 06-21-2020 at 09:55 PM. Reason: clarity

  17. #16

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    ^ absolutely ck74... super eclectic!!..they had a real mix/fusion...often rock guys in feature story or on cover, but inside was everything...and the columns in back...jerry hahn, tommy tedesco, carol kaye, howard roberts, etc etc

    i used to study those mags...

    to jim crockett!

    cheers

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    ^ absolutely ck74... super eclectic!!..they had a real mix/fusion...often rock guys in feature story or on cover, but inside was everything...and the columns in back...jerry hahn, tommy tedesco, carol kaye, howard roberts, etc etc

    i used to study those mags...

    to jim crockett!

    cheers

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff
    I don’t know whatcha talkin’ about...

    Add some boats, some bikes and some horses and it’s all good!

    And blowguns! I have one of my own for non-leathally chasing away critters.

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by nopedals
    I have this dim recollection about Randy Bachman and Guitar Player, and maybe you oldtimers can correct me.

    Until about 50 years ago Guitar Player and its readers were mostly about jazz, and Bachman was one of the first rock guys to get a serious profile in the magazine. He was somewhat earnest and told the interviewer that he learned to play Chet Atkins songs note for note as part of learning to play guitar. The next month's letters to the editor were brutal, incredulous that he could play at that level "this guy can only play three chords, why is he in the magazine?" Soon there after rock players were regularly on the cover. Anyway, that's how I remember it.
    $

    Let's face it----and DB, same thing. Not dissing rock here, but the marketplace is what it is...

  21. #20

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    A couple of BTO tunes with some great guitar work that jazzers should appreciate, especially the outros

    Blue Collar, one of my favorite solos:


    Lookin' Out for #1:

  22. #21

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    a jazzier guess who



    undun

    cheers

  23. #22

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    I remember Guitar Player as being fairly eclectic.
    I just did a search just now for the first issue (from 1967) and although I have not seen a copy, the featured artists were: Chet Atkins, Barney Kessel, Charlie Byrd, and the Jefferson Airplane.

    I bought the mag at a Nashville grocery store in the early '70s. Not religiously, just whenever. Classical and country artists seemed to get their share of attention. Some of the lessons in the back were way over my head while others were less daunting.

    The older I got, the more the lessons made sense to me. ;o) I think the mag always had a soft-spot for good blues guitarists who had paid their dues. BB King was on the cover more than once. There was a great interview with BB that Billy Gibbons took part in. (Billy was asking some of the questions; Jas Orbecht was author of the piece.) Talks about getting his first gig in Memphis, about his cousin Bukka White, fascinating stuff.

  24. #23

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    jas obrecht has wonderful archive site with interviews from gp & more

    Jas Obrecht Archive

    cheers

  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgcim
    The lyrics to AW might have been a metaphor for something else, but I noticed a bunch of Guess Who songs that put down a woman in their lyrics. 'Undone' and the one with the line "She graduated from the school for losers".
    Might be a good PHD thesis topic.
    I always heard that the "American Woman" was the Statue Of Liberty.

  26. #25

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  27. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thumpalumpacus
    While I sympathize with the song's antiwar lyrics, I generally dislike polemic songs and this one is no exception. The riff is pretty basic even for hard rock, and I'm an oddball who thinks that allegory only works when it isn't so obvious. You have an opinion. That's nice.

    The only song I've ever liked from the GW is "No Time". It too casts a woman in the role of antagonist (this time literally rather than metaphorically imo). Somebody was havin' a bad couple of years.
    That's another one for my sub-genre list, thanks!

  28. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by citizenk74
    I started reading GP in the fall of '69, IIRC. Either Leslie West or Jimi Hendrix was the cover story. My recollection of those early days, when Jim Crockett(sp?) was editor was that they covered everyone who played guitar- classical, flamenco, Jazz, blues, country, folk, rock, pop, whatever. What I do distinctly remember is that many of the jazz guys favorably spoke of Duane Allman's playing. The approach was very eclectic, and I read every issue cover-to-cover over and over until the copies disintegrated. By the time i stopped collecting the magazines, I had a three-foot tall stack moldering in the garage. I had to stop, the GAS was killing me.
    GP was the only rag I ever subscribed to (20 years, roughly), precisely because they were so eclectic in their coverage. I could read about Ed Bickert, Tony Iommi, Jerry Reed, de Lucia ... sometimes in the same issue, it seemed.

    I let my sub lapse when they started abbreviating their articles and referring to their website.

  29. #28

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    "The only song I've ever liked from the GW is "No Time""

    What, no love for "No Sugar"?

  30. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon
    "The only song I've ever liked from the GW is "No Time""

    What, no love for "No Sugar"?
    No sugar for that song tonight ... or any other night, I'm afraid.

    I just never had it in for that band's songs, I guess. But "No Time" hit me, oddly enough, at the right time to make sense to me. Plus, those clean arpeggiations are a wonder to behold. Perfect counterpoint to the gritty riff.

  31. #30

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    What, no love for "Clap for the Wolfman"????
    Not my favorite either, but it popped into my head and now I can't shake it out.


  32. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by zdub
    A couple of BTO tunes with some great guitar work that jazzers should appreciate, especially the outros

    Blue Collar, one of my favorite solos:


    Lookin' Out for #1:
    And a couple of cool vids of that old and not so old.




  33. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    What, no love for "Clap for the Wolfman"????
    Not my favorite either, but it popped into my head and now I can't shake it out.

    I got got got got no time for that, lol. It's all good.

  34. #33

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    ^
    it's all accordin to how your boogaloo situation stands......



  35. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon
    ^
    it's all accordin to how your boogaloo situation stands......


    Let’s not bring the accordion into it.

    What’s next, ukulele? Banjo?