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  1. #1

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    Just wondering.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Yes !

  4. #3

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    Love it. Seriously. It sounds dated now, but has some serious grooves and moments of magic. I prefer the album that paved the way to it, In A Silent Way.

  5. #4

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    i really like it but i dont listen to it.

    got to be in the right mood, which for me seems to be once every few years.

  6. #5

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    Love it, but like basinstreet said, I need to be in the mood for it, it’s like going into a trance or something!

    I love the way they used multiple electric pianos, great sound. I kind of wish Miles had used that sound in the 80s instead of those cheesy synths, I reckon it would have dated better! Funky retro Rhodes piano seems to be making a bit of a comeback these days.

  7. #6

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    Not really. I feel somehow like I should, and I've given it a lot of spins, but no not really.

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop View Post
    Love it. Seriously. It sounds dated now, but has some serious grooves and moments of magic. I prefer the album that paved the way to it, In A Silent Way.
    Ditto! I have the complete In A Silent Way (3 disks) and it's hypnotic.

  9. #8

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    Yes, then. No, now.

  10. #9

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    Like others here I like it and appreciate it, but it is not a frequent listen for me. To me it is like other great art that is making a statement and/or pushing boundaries, but not meant to be easily digestible or enjoyable. Similar to classical pieces by Schoenberg, Webern, etc. Movies can be similar as well, like something like "Requiem for a Dream" or "A Clockwork Orange"

  11. #10

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    To me it's one of those .. I guess you have to have been there albums

  12. #11

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    Absolutely love it. Still sounds heavy and current to me, much more than Miles' later electric work.

    In a Silent Way also really holds up for me.

  13. #12

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    Sure i do. I like 'in a silent way' even more.

  14. #13

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    Yes it's great

  15. #14

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    Disc 2 is much more conventional sounding jazz rock than Disc 1

    i wonder if the track order was different if it would have such a reputation for difficulty?

  16. #15

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    Bitches Brew is what drew me to Miles when it was released. A forerunner of sorts to the jazz-rock that was beginning in the day. From there I backed up to Miles earlier groups and now prefer his 50's bands mostly. Heard him in concert during that time as well which was a treat. So, yes, I like BB but these days don't listen to it all that often.

  17. #16

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    I'm joining others in liking it, and liking In A Silent Way more, but d'you know what I listen to more often? His final Prestige recording, Walkin', Cookin', Relaxin', Workin' and Steamin'.

    And we haven't even mentioned Kinda Blue...

  18. #17

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    Some tracks are more badass than others. "Spanish Key" is a groovy blast. The title track can sound like a 1970s public service announcement about the dangers of PCP.

    All the electric stuff from 'Brew' to 'Agartha' is good jogging music! All that neurotic funk and tension makes you want to keep moving down the road, and there are lots of hip licks flying by from the various players to appreciate.

  19. #18

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    I prefer in a Silent Way too.

  20. #19

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    I prefer Tutu!

  21. #20

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    No

  22. #21

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    i liked, and still do, the whole first electric miles period from in a silent way thru pangaea...still listen to them regularly...has to be remembered that miles was recording fairly loose jams with a variety of players and the results were then edited by teo macero into the records we now know...

    if you have the bitches brew box you can hear the jams from which the original recording were put together from...

    if you like the miles electric stuff, make sure to check the bill laswell remixes on the album panthalassa...he re-edits and remixes, transforming the old tapes into sonic bliss



    cheers

  23. #22

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    An all-time favorite.

    Always sounds fresh to me.

  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyLoveHandles View Post
    I'm joining others in liking it, and liking In A Silent Way more, but d'you know what I listen to more often? His final Prestige recording, Walkin', Cookin', Relaxin', Workin' and Steamin'.

    And we haven't even mentioned Kinda Blue...
    For me, those are in a class by themselves. What a lineup! And correct me if I'm wrong, but I seem to recall that they were all together recorded in about a week so that Miles could get out of his contract with Prestige so that he could sign with Columbia. Wow!

  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by darkwaters View Post
    For me, those are in a class by themselves. What a lineup! And correct me if I'm wrong, but I seem to recall that they were all together recorded in about a week so that Miles could get out of his contract with Prestige so that he could sign with Columbia. Wow!
    Pretty close: Miles Davis discography - Wikipedia

    April 3, 1954 Walkin'
    October 26, 1956 Cookin'
    May 11 - October 26, 1956 Relaxin'
    May 11 - October 26, 1956 Workin'
    May 11 - October 26, 1956 Steamin'

    Busy, day, October 26!

  26. #25

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    I'll have to give it a listen, not put on any electric Miles in years.
    I'll whisper this very quietly, but I've never really got Miles Davis. I like a lot of his stuff with Coltrane, especially the live recordings. I like some of his Gil Evans albums too, and Birth of the Cool. But in general he just doesn't grab me emotionally the way certain other canonical jazz greats do (e.g. Coltrane, Monk, Mingus) or even notable Davis collaborators like Wayne Shorter or Tony Williams. Maybe there's something wrong with my ears.

  27. #26

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    No, it's too out there for me. My tastes are unbelievably vanilla. To give you an idea, Willie Nelson's Stardust was my springboard into jazz.

  28. #27

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    I like it! For me it brings back fond memories of being young, listening to new music, going to new places, trying new things. Ahh the good ol' days

  29. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic View Post
    i liked, and still do, the whole first electric miles period from in a silent way thru pangaea...still listen to them regularly...has to be remembered that miles was recording fairly loose jams with a variety of players and the results were then edited by teo macero into the records we now know...

    if you have the bitches brew box you can hear the jams from which the original recording were put together from...

    if you like the miles electric stuff, make sure to check the bill laswell remixes on the album panthalassa...he re-edits and remixes, transforming the old tapes into sonic bliss



    cheers
    I love Panthalassa

  30. #29

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    For me it was a gateway recording that led me to recordings by all the participants.

    My first three jazz records were Tony Williams Lifetime (Turn It Over), John Coltrane (Sunship), and Miles Davis (Bitches Brew).

    Weather Report followed shortly (I Sing and the first one).



    Still going to school on those recordings.

  31. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    I love Panthalassa
    yes that Bill Laswell record is great, it’s an excellent cherry-pick of the best bits from those forbiddingly long 70s albums and with much improved sound, especially the drums:


  32. #31

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    ‘Aura’ is great too, with John McLaughlin:


  33. #32

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    I like it but its not my favorite. I haven't listened to it in years. My favorites Miles recording from that period are "Jack Johnson", "In a Silent Way", and "Agarta".

    I listened today to Weather Reports "I sing the Body Electric"....I love the live cuts , Mahavishnu Orchestra "Visions of the Emerald Beyond" and Carlos Santana/Alice Coltrane " Illuminations". I was in a 70's fusion frame of mind. I cleansed my palate if you will with George Benson's "Bad Benson". The bonus cut of "Serbian Blue" contains some monster riffage from GB.

  34. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyLoveHandles View Post
    I'm joining others in liking it, and liking In A Silent Way more, but d'you know what I listen to more often? His final Prestige recording, Walkin', Cookin', Relaxin', Workin' and Steamin'.

    And we haven't even mentioned Kinda Blue...
    I love those Prestige albums as well as Someday My Prince Will Come, not to mention Kind Of Blue, but Miles lost me at Bitches and beyond.

    Danny W.

  35. #34

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    Bitches is such a great record...iconic. There was before Bitches and after...

    I agree with the above...it’s like Clockwork Orange, can’t listen to it everyday.

    Teo Macero seems to have played an outsized role with this album. He has come in for a fair amount of criticism, but his role in sculpting Miles’ sound and that of others like Brubeck is undeniable.

    From his Wiki entry:

    Behind the scenes, Miles and Teo took the tapes of the In a Silent Way sessions and transformed some beautiful, folk-tinged, melody-driven sets into two exquisite, beguiling and otherworldly pieces of music. Using techniques that pre-dated the proliferation of tape loops, cut-ups, edits and sequencing in rock, pop, hip hop and dance music, Miles and Teo took apart the original recording and reassembled them outside of any traditional or accepted jazz structure or melodic framework. This idea of taking jazz away from its birth, genesis and flowering as a live art and into the studio would soon become standard practice, but in 1969 it was groundbreaking.

    It took a force like Teo to splice together a cohesive album out of so many inspired pieces. Not only did Teo have the balls to stand up to Miles on creative decisions, he had the right. And Miles knew it. And while his ego rebelled against any producer messing with his music, Miles knew that incredibly great records were borne out of the conflict and compromise of his relationship with Teo.

    Macero's innovative techniques were inspired partially by his association with avant-garde composer Edgard Varèse, and they continue to impact the way musicians, producers, and remixers work in the studio today. Brian Eno, a producer who has worked extensively with U2 and Talking Heads, among others, talked about Macero's influence on him in a 1996 interview with jazzthetik magazine. Eno describes being "fascinated" by Macero's editing techniques and the "spatial" quality he added to the music. "He did something that was extremely modern."

    I will say that anything with Bernie Maupin playing bass clarinet is off-the-chart awesome. My favorite instrument among the instruments one doesn’t hear too often on recordings.

  36. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop View Post
    ‘Aura’ is great too, with John McLaughlin:

    aura is beautifull!

  37. #36

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    Yes. I haven't listened to it for awhile but there was a time it was glued to my TURNTABLE.

  38. #37

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    I love everything Miles, including BBrew. Been listening to it for 50 years and still put it on from time to time.

    For myself, Miles from beginning to end is kinda like the primordial stew that most of my music comes from in some form or other. We all know the list of players. Different periods bubble to the top of the playlist from time to time. Spent a few months listening to Donna Lee recently while I was learning that one. That's how he rolls for me.

    Currently on a more mid-60's kick though. Up to Nefertiti. You know... the one that led to Silent Way that led to Bitches that led to... :)

  39. #38

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    Bitches Brew is a really important record for me. Along with some Ornette, Sonny Sharrock and Cecil Taylor, it helped form the basis for my playing.

    But I totally get that some people just don't dig it. And that's cool too!

  40. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by rmpmcdermott View Post
    Bitches Brew is a really important record for me. Along with some Ornette, Sonny Sharrock and Cecil Taylor, it helped form the basis for my playing.

    But I totally get that some people just don't dig it. And that's cool too!
    Absolutely. How boring it would be if we were all the same.

  41. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by darkwaters View Post
    Ditto! I have the complete In A Silent Way (3 disks) and it's hypnotic.
    I prefer In a Silent Way to Bitches Brew about 50 to 1.

  42. #41

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    Some of it. I love Miles Runs the Voodoo Down. One of my favourite Davis recordings in any era along with Right Off from Jack Johnson. Sanctuary is hauntingly beautiful. I like John MacLaughlin and Spanish key for their grooves. There's energy to them. The title track and Phaorahs Dance are too meandering and directionless for me to sit through anymore, especially the out of time sections on BB. I tend to like electric miles better when there's a beat to it.

    I have the box set, and some of the outtakes/alternative takes is as good as the released album. I understand one of the versions of Double Image is also on Live-Evil (i haven't heard that album in a couple of decades), and that's some masterful playing from John McLaughlin

  43. #42

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    Another great update:


  44. #43

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    I did like Bitches Brew but remember thinking that this needs kinda special mood to listen through. I've had it once

  45. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by BWV View Post
    Another great update:

    yeah, lots of miles ex-players on that...inc. pete cosey!...dave liebman, mike stern, michael henderson and mclaughlin

    cheers

  46. #45

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    It's a classic for sure

  47. #46

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    This thread just made me realize why my Jazz musical tastes are somewhat limited. I came to Jazz later in life.

    When you are young, you have time to experiment with different styles of music and sub-styles of a certain type of music. But like certain styles of food, or certain dishes, if I don't like the way it tastes, I am going to move on to something that I like because my "playtime" is limited.

    And can't get enough of the styles of music and Jazz that I already like, so there is sadly no room for gaining appreciation for any other.

    Maybe when the kids are gone and I can once again sit around and have more time to myself to listen....