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  1. #1

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    Sept 1st, 1980

    Some of the younger folk maybe weren't exposed to this. Is this my favorite album ever? Maybe.


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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    That's a pretty good one, and frankly the only recording w PM that I can listen to.
    I'll vote for this....


  4. #3

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    Larry Carlton Last Nite

    Amazing live chemistry, artistry, melody, rhythm, musicianship. Still remember the day I bought it way back then



    Larry Carlton Last Nite Live complete - YouTube

  5. #4

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    Doesn't say favorite jazz albums, so here goes:

    No need to be specific. Think Prince, Talking Heads, U2, Paul Simon, Michael Jackson, AC/DC, Police, various others.

  6. #5

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    This is not my final answer but I think this is from a good pop album from 1980 ("Arc of a Diver") that was succesful at the time but I don't hear it mentioned much anymore. I think it holds up well.


  7. #6

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    Released in 1983 I'm going with Jimmy Raney and The Master; Here is Billie's Bounce:


  8. #7

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    Grateful Dead "Reckoning," e.g.,



    Wonderful marriage of music and lyrics...

    to lie with you, once more, to lie with you
    with our dreams entwined together
    to wake beside you, my love still sleepin'
    to tell sweet lies one last time and say good night
    Last edited by Cunamara; 05-20-2020 at 04:15 PM.

  9. #8

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    Favorite album from the 1980s-91gwxsxpgcl-_ac_sl1425_-jpg

  10. #9

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    Not a guitar-heavy album but just the same :

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil59 View Post
    Doesn't say favorite jazz albums, so here goes:

    No need to be specific. Think Prince, Talking Heads, U2, Paul Simon, Michael Jackson, AC/DC, Police, various others.

    Some great stuff there .. I have a weakness for the Euro synth based early 80s stuff like Ultravox



    And not to mention that my 15 to 18 year old self loved absolutely loved these guys

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon View Post
    That's a pretty good one, and frankly the only recording w PM that I can listen to.
    I'll vote for this....

    What do you mean by 'w PM'? Thanks

    Benson playing straight ahead in the 80s was always nice to listen to.

  13. #12

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    Metheny

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by gggomez View Post
    Larry Carlton Last Nite

    Amazing live chemistry, artistry, melody, rhythm, musicianship. Still remember the day I bought it way back then



    Larry Carlton Last Nite Live complete - YouTube
    For jazz, hell yeah.

    I've got other faves for other genres, but Last Nite is a great album. For heavy rock: Back in Black. For new wave, Spring Seesion M from Missing Persons. Pop? Stronger Than Pride, from Sade, or 1999 from Prince. Thrash is Metalllica's And Justice for All.

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon View Post
    Metheny
    Ok, that's what I assumed but the album cover I found on net only said it was 'featuring' Benson, Carter, Tate and Turrentine (but 'featuring' should have been a tip off that there were others on this).

    The few tracks I listen to with Benson sounded fine but generally I don't like these 'featuring' albums and the Amazon user comment ad is really a turnoff with "I like George Benson's guitar on this CDs' combination of smoother jazz and swing, however Smith's organ playing lacks the magic of his older recordings. For a .... ".

    But like I said 80's Benson on non smoother jazz \ singing tunes is always worth a look-see.

  16. #15

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    Anything by Talking Heads. I was not listening to serious music in the 80s.

  17. #16

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    was referring to Metheny on the Joni Mitchell record. Not a Metheny fan but like him as as a sideman here. The Smith record is outstanding in every way imo, even though he's using a bassist, I usually prefer organ recordings w left hand bass + pedals, but this lp is an exception for me

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon View Post
    was referring to Metheny on the Joni Mitchell record. Not a Metheny fan but like him as as a sideman here. The Smith record is outstanding in every way imo, even though he's using a bassist, I usually prefer organ recordings w left hand bass + pedals, but this lp is an exception for me
    Ok, I get it now (I needed to look UP). The use of 'that' (or 'this') strikes me, yet again.

    As for the Smith recording, good to hear since I have seen other recommendations from you and we have similar taste.
    Last edited by jameslovestal; 05-18-2020 at 01:49 PM.

  19. #18

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    May not be my absolute favorite, but it's up there in the top 10. The most introspective Morse ever got. Brilliantly executed and brilliantly recorded.

    Steve Morse - High Tension Wires




    .

  20. #19

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    For me, it's Tom Wait's Rain Dogs, as well as Frank's Wild Years, Big Time and Swordfishtrombone. Tom was on fire in the 80s and didn't sound like anything else from that era.

    Favorite album from the 1980s-rain-dogs-jpg
    Last edited by darkwaters; 05-21-2020 at 07:49 AM.

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    This is not my final answer but I think this is from a good pop album from 1980 ("Arc of a Diver") that was succesful at the time but I don't hear it mentioned much anymore. I think it holds up well.

    That is certainly a high point (high life?) for Winwood, and one of the best pop records of the 80's.

    As far as pop music, I would have to go with Peter Gabriel's So, though PG3 (Melt) would be a close second. It absolutely redefined the artist and the role of art music in pop culture.



    Eno's solo work and collaborations were particularly fruitful as well--U2's the Unforgettable Fire and Talking Heads Remain in Light. And of course David Bowie's Scary Monsters and Let's Dance.

    While I did listen to and buy jazz obsessively in the 80's, I am hard pressed to think of anything earth-shattering from that decade. The 60's and 70's were MUCH better IMO.

    However, the Herbie Hancock album Future Shock lit up the charts and the dance floors at the time. Hard to think of anything more impactful in terms jazz influence on the general public.

    John McLaughlin, Pat Metheny , John Scofield and Chick Corea all put out some fine albums at the time. And of course the debut of Wynton Marsalis in 1982 and the return of Miles in 1982.

  22. #21

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    I'm not sure what I'd say today, looking back at the 80s, but back in the early 80s, this was one of my favorites. So many who played in open tunings seemed to let the tuning play them. Alex was always about composition and the tuning just facilitated communicating the song.


  23. #22

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    Too many to list, but....














  24. #23

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  25. #24

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    Stevie Ray Vaughan made at least two great albums in the '80s, "Texas Flood" and "In Step."
    A song from each




  26. #25

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    For Jazz, outside of the obvious Pat Metheny Albums there is



    and (recorded in 89, released in 90)


  27. #26

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    Always hard to pick just one, but this one would be near the top for me.

  28. #27

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  29. #28

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    Three records of Wayne Shorter's in '80s are actually full of beautiful compositions. Those typical '80s drums and keyboards are disastrous though.

  30. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo View Post


    How good is Bonnie Raitt's slide playing? Instantly recognizable as is her voice.

    Years ago I loved trying to play slide and there was all these guys with these pyrotechnics sliding all over, but I always thought her tone and VIBRATO was just the best.

  31. #30

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    Making Movies from Dire Straits

  32. #31

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    and 2, and 3, and 4 and 5, and 6 to follow

  33. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by 339 in june View Post

    and 2, and 3, and 4 and 5, and 6 to follow
    Those have some good moments but they were not released in the 80's.

    Shut Up and Play Your Guitar was released then. Some of his 80's albums were quite good, some rather meh, but not comparable to his mid-late 70's fusion masterpieces IMO. I did see him twice in the 80's--great concerts.

    Edit: I stand corrected. The first 3 of them were released in '88-89. I don't think they were widely available--mail order only? I certainly never saw them at my local record store.

  34. #33

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    Loved being hipped to the Grolnick and Jimmy Smith records.

    While Sco is an obvious choice for this forum and this thread, here's is an eighties Sco album I'd been meaning to check out for decades, and didn't get around to until this month. Sco is playing his butt off on this live session with the Pullen/Adams Quartet.

    The reviews of this record weren't great, said he didn't really mesh with the group...and it does have a "playing to the jazz festival crowd" vibe...but it's Sco playing intense straight ahead jazz in 1985, with fellow travelers (all these musicians except the bass player were featured on mid-70s Mingus albums). I'm sure if they played a week at Sweet Basil and then went into the studio, a very different kind of record would have been made. But I'm digging this record as a document of a time and place, and especially the energy of the opening cut, "IJ", a blues written by Sco. I wish Sco's Blue Note album with Eddie Harris had a bit more of this kind of energy. This live date also has some more subtle stuff--it's not all barn burners.



    Also, all of the late, great Hal Willner's concept albums from the 80s are treasures to me (and the 1992 Mingus, the last of the great run IMHO). Carla Bley's work in particular is outstanding on the first three:
    Last edited by 44lombard; 05-24-2020 at 05:39 PM.

  35. #34

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    Earl Klugh's 'Solo guitar' album was made in 89. Some tracks a bit background music, but others are fantastic.