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  1. #51

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    I couldn't make it up the Montmatre anymore...guess ev'rything's coming to its end.


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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

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    Quote Originally Posted by crusoe View Post
    I couldn't make it up the Montmatre anymore...guess ev'rything's coming to its end.

    It really demonstates that Gipsy Jazz grew up from Bal Musette

    I lived 30 years in Paris between 1966 and 1996 and never liked Montmartre either. However there are lovely small cafes / bars Porte De Clignancourt, very close to the East side of "Marché aux Puces" (the big flea market inParis) where Gipsy Jazz is played regularly, without the Montmartre look & envahissement of nowadays.
    Last edited by mhch; 04-07-2020 at 09:52 AM.

  4. #53

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    Don’t forget the polka! :-)

  5. #54

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    I should have thought of this much earlier, the celebration in Paris of Django's 100th birthday. Couldn't find any shot of the complete concert, just a few random extracts

    This one certainly showing the larger Gipsy Jazz band your ever watched





    And this one which is one that I already knew and which always impresses me the most


  6. #55

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    Good old Amsterdam...


  7. #56

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  8. #57

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    Alive and well...


  9. #58

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    Family Tradition:


  10. #59

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    Bucky, you're missed


  11. #60

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    Quote Originally Posted by crusoe View Post
    Alive and well...

    I've seen those guys before. Super swinging. That's the feel I like. NOLA eh?

  12. #61

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    Antoine Boyer posted this marvellous thing the other day:



    To me this almost like Chopin on guitar or something. Amazing touch!

  13. #62

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    Also his guitar is really cool. What is it?

  14. #63

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    yes NOLA, the guitarist is Molly Reeves, excellent at swing comping!

    Envoyé de mon SM-A520F en utilisant Tapatalk

  15. #64

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Also his guitar is really cool. What is it?
    I don't know but that's sort of along the lines of my dream guitar. A modern F hole guitar (patterned after a D'Aquisto Centurion) but with Selmac guts and a humbucker pickup.

    Not going to be commissioning anything anytime soon though.

  16. #65

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Also his guitar is really cool. What is it?
    It is a custom Di Mauro Chorus style guitar built by French luthier Yohann Cholet.

  17. #66

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    Keep it alive Boys...That's my kind of pensioners


  18. #67

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    I really really love that old stuff. It's got a certain kind of dusty atmosphere.
    The Ferret Family of long gone times.


  19. #68

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    Great Read.

    Django - his legacy and predecessors-gj-jpg

  20. #69

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    Hot Club Du Nax


  21. #70

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    Titi Winterstein

    wonderful violin


  22. #71

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    ...and not to forget Walter Malosetti


  23. #72

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    Django's Brother and Son...


  24. #73

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    Fapy Lafertin & Paulus Schäfer


  25. #74

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    Check out the Greg Ruby Quartet


  26. #75

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    I've been a fan of Stephane Wrembel and Gonzalo Bergara for about 10 years. Lately, I've been digging deeper and this thread is very relevant to me right now.

    The internet lessons I've seen by Yaakov Hoter (here on this site) and Sven Jungbeck have been incredibly helpful. I also bought Wrembel's book.

    The basic Django compilations like the classic blue "Best of" and "Djangology" are helping me keep things simple. I'm also trying to listen to people slowly to avoid overload. I like Bergara so I've been listening to the album he did with Adrien Moignard. Wrembel was influenced by Angelo Debarre, Bireli Lagrene, and Stochelo Rosenberg (among others) and I've peeked at their catalogs as well. I also stumbled onto Les Doigts de l'Homme and Olli Soikkeli.

    Lastly, I've been listening to guitarists I know were influenced by Django but had their own thing going on. Tonight I listened to "For Django" by Joe Pass. Of course there's Les Paul and even Tony Iommi.

    I'm not really sure what direction I'm going to take this in. For now, I'm just learning songs on my acoustic (and my unplugged Telecaster at night). So we'll see what happens once we come out on the other side of the current state of world affairs. But I enjoy the music, especially when it's not just straight Django tunes.


  27. #76

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    TBF there’s not many who aren’t influenced by Django.

    For instance people usually see the evolution from Wes, but I hear a lot Django in George Benson for instance. And I’m not the only one it would seem....

    And then listening to bluegrass - the influence is more latent but it’s there...

  28. #77

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    Pass the wine...

  29. #78

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    Huge Hands, tiny hands...doesn't matter.

  30. #79

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    Django - his legacy and predecessors-sw-jpg

    Great Book. Not easy, but after a while you'll see the light

  31. #80

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    Quote Originally Posted by crusoe
    Django - his legacy and predecessors-sw-jpg

    Great Book. Not easy, but after a while you'll see the light
    This is the book I'm currently using. Wrembel did a video session Guitar World has put on YouTube over the past 6 months. The exercises are pretty much taken from the book, and using them together has been very helpful.

  32. #81

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    Quote Originally Posted by Help!I'maRock!
    This is the book I'm currently using. Wrembel did a video session Guitar World has put on YouTube over the past 6 months. The exercises are pretty much taken from the book, and using them together has been very helpful.
    I like that shape-concept. (see Herb Ellis, Charlie Christian)
    I'm at page 38 Django - his legacy and predecessors-wr-jpg

  33. #82

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    Quote Originally Posted by crusoe
    I like that shape-concept. (see Herb Ellis, Charlie Christian)
    I'm at page 38 Django - his legacy and predecessors-wr-jpg
    That's a good one. I also like Sven Jungbeck's "Proper Chords" videos. They've helped me start on Minor Swing and All of Me.

  34. #83

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    For a while I resisted it but the DC Music School stuff is great. You have to be a bit self motivated and know what you're looking for because it's mostly about great players, not necessarily great teachers. Also Dennis Chang is making some free youtube videos lately. The dude knows what he's talking about. I think he has some basic stuff on soundslice which I'm sure is good.

    Sebastian Giniaux is my favorite. I've been working on one of his solos from the DC music school video for a few months. It was entirely over my head (and still is) but I've been slowly working on it phrase by phrase and it's taught me tons. He's just an impressive improvisor and just an amazing musician.

    Also the Yorgui Loeffler one, there's not much teaching but his technique is unbelievable. He sort of does a hybrid gypsy picking thing where it's sort of in the spirit of the gypsy picking but he freely will backwards sweep or whatever else he needs to do. His picking arm is a like a machine, in a good way. Check out his Montagne St Genevieve recording on youtube, it's unreal.

    Stephane's book is good. I wasn't quite as into his DC Music school video although there's some good stuff. If you get a chance to see him live, he's an impressive performer. He recently did a CD of Django's solo stuff (the "improvisations") that's really great. Also good because ensemble playing is a little unlikely at the moment.

    The Sebastian Giniaux tracks on this album are my very favorite modern gypsy jazz

    https://open.spotify.com/album/6tlXn...QZCPLnr4V0Ihpw
    Last edited by sully75; 06-12-2020 at 06:18 PM.

  35. #84

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    Quote Originally Posted by sully75

    The Sebastian Giniaux tracks on this album are my very favorite modern gypsy jazz

    https://open.spotify.com/album/6tlXn...QZCPLnr4V0Ihpw
    What album is this? The link doesn't work for me.

    Also, I had never heard of him and the first album that comes up is Franck Wolf's "Acoustic Five" record that was released in March. This is my kinda thing. Thanks!

  36. #85

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    Quote Originally Posted by Help!I'maRock!
    What album is this? The link doesn't work for me.

    Also, I had never heard of him and the first album that comes up is Franck Wolf's "Acoustic Five" record that was released in March. This is my kinda thing. Thanks!
    The Album is:
    Le QuecumBar International Gypsy Swing Guitar Festival

    Can't provide a link at the moment but it's on spotify.

    Also if you haven't heard Tcha Limberger, he's extraordinary in a different way. I have a hard time listening to Tcha...only because he's so good and so emotional, it is somehow a little painful. He's got Edith Piaf level emotion. But truly an amazing musician. A sort of bookend to Sebastian. He's been putting out little videos on youtube during the pandemic, they are pretty amazing.

    Sebastian and Tcha both know real gypsy music really well. Sebastian is also a classical cellist and plays electric perfectly. And Tcha is a great violinist. If you watch Tcha, watch the way he voices chords and moves voices. It's pretty wild.

    Truly inspiring guys. I've seen Sebastian play live in Paris a few times and so glad I did.

  37. #86

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    Quote Originally Posted by crusoe
    Django - his legacy and predecessors-sw-jpg

    Great Book. Not easy, but after a while you'll see the light
    I actually wasn't a big fan of this book. However, it did get me started on the important concept of gypsy picking, especially down up down triplets.

    I found Michael Horowitz's book "Gypsy picking" to be a better first book. If you haven't been in this forum yet you should:
    Recent Discussions — DjangoBooks Forum
    Helpful people there too.

  38. #87

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    It's really great that a few of us are interested in Gypsy Jazz Guitar. Jimmy Rosenberg once said
    something like: If you're fast and know Django's Music you can play anything.
    (and how right he is...)
    I've played so called Jazz/Blues all my life and I wanted something new...and here it is.
    Lots and lots of new players to discover. (...and don't forget the "old" ones)


  39. #88

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    What guitars are you playing ? I play a round-back nylon and I'm on the look-out for
    a gypsy guitar. Let's see.

    This book is the best I ever found:
    Django - his legacy and predecessors-manouche-jpg

  40. #89

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    I had a nice little "first" today. Was listening to Stephane Wrembel's version of All Of Me and I picked the guitar up and was able to transcribe each phrase (from half of one chorus) almost straightaway. I have really poor ears, but this is testament to learning the shapes and arpeggios from his book, getting the sound inside your own head and then... hey presto! I think this was a one-off, as I'm only starting this journey, too, but it was still kind of nice :-)

    Derek

  41. #90

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    Quote Originally Posted by crusoe
    It's really great that a few of us are interested in Gypsy Jazz Guitar. Jimmy Rosenberg once said
    something like: If you're fast and know Django's Music you can play anything.
    (and how right he is...)
    I've played so called Jazz/Blues all my life and I wanted something new...and here it is.
    Lots and lots of new players to discover. (...and don't forget the "old" ones)

    Just for the record Gypsy jazz is thriving right now. (or was, before you know what). I was in Paris in February and March, there were shows every night. With the top players. In 10 or so days I saw Angelo Debarre, Sebastian Giniaux, Sami Daussat, Noe Reinhardt, etc etc. In the US there's probably at least a band's worth of players in every city. Here in Baltimore we have a pretty amazing scene. Really excellent professional players.

  42. #91

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    Quote Originally Posted by crusoe
    If you're fast and know Django's Music you can play anything.
    Well that's 2 strikes against me. Better get practicing!

  43. #92

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    Especially the old records have a wonderful warm sound. Sully75 is absolutely right that
    this music is all over the place. The Netherlands and France are hotbeds and it's a pity that
    so many festivals had been cancled this year.(we know why...)


  44. #93

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    Another amazing player is Rocky Gresset. He's sort of a man of mystery. All the great players rave about him. I think he mostly works playing backup to other people.

    I'm 90% sure he's playing nylon string here. It's an instagram post.
    Login • Instagram

  45. #94

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    Quote Originally Posted by crusoe View Post
    Django - his legacy and predecessors-sw-jpg

    Great Book. Not easy, but after a while you'll see the light
    I take weekly lessons with Stephane. It helps to have him along with the book

  46. #95

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    It must be remembered that Django had many musical and other creative talents: