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  1. #1

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    Jimmy and Doug in a quartet setting. For me, it does not get any better. This is what bebop guitar is all about. Legal upload by the way.

    Raney 81 - YouTube
    Last edited by DB's Jazz Guitar Blog; 02-17-2020 at 05:24 PM.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    My teacher in '79! And a lasting influence ('The Influence')...

  4. #3

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    First Jimmy Raney album I heard - instantly converted me!

  5. #4

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    Only 2 replies to a thread about a player so important to me (and many others---once) makes me feel----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------old...

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    Only 2 replies to a thread about a player so important to me (and many others---once) makes me feel----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------old...
    Well we can't have that. Jimmy Raney was one of my big influences. I still teach his solos to my students because his lines were so perfect.

  7. #6

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    One of my favorite jazz records, period. Raney hit such a stride in his "second career" as I call it, such a string of good records, beautiful sound, masterful playing.

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    Only 2 replies to a thread about a player so important to me (and many others---once) makes me feel----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------old...
    yeah, but 10 'likes' already

  9. #8

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    It’s been posted before, but it’s good:

    PREPARED GUITAR: How Did I Become A Living Legend by Jimmy Raney

  10. #9

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    Jimmy was one of those players who never felt the need to radically change the source material---like Sonny Stitt, Getz, Pat Martino, others. He also seemed happy to play the same repertoire and stick to that same small group setting. One youngun from hometown Louisville (who actually really admired him) smirkingly said 'he's been playing the same licks for 30 years'.

    Maybe he was from the 'if it ain't broke...' school. Dunno. I do know that his playing deepened in later years---in sound, spacing, asymmetry. And there was one significant change: a lifelong love of classical music that was always front and center in his writing moved up in his playing. He loved, for example, Bartok. Eddie Diehl used to say that when Jimmy stayed with him briefly he would talk obsessively about Bartok, and how he wanted to play like he wrote. I know he started ending pieces (like the live Darn That Dream from Tokyo) with a quote from (I think) Petrouchka---and I could be dead wrong attribution-wise, but I've heard that exact passage in a Bartok piece. I know he talked as much about classical influences as jazz the few times we got together for lessons (and when he stayed with Tim Whalen in summer of '80, for the festival he played with Getz).

    I think he did go somewhat afield from his early reputation as a successful Charlie Parker guitar interpreter with his own additions to that language.

    Young radicals and fellow travelers, if they live long enough, are one day labeled 'conservatives'. Isn't that lovely?

  11. #10

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    This one cracked me up, too---good, dryly humorous writing:

    PREPARED GUITAR: Things Downbeat Never Taught Me by Jimmy Raney

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    Jimmy was one of those players who never felt the need to radically change the source material---like Sonny Stitt, Getz, Pat Martino, others. He also seemed happy to play the same repertoire and stick to that same small group setting. One youngun from hometown Louisville (who actually really admired him) smirkingly said 'he's been playing the same licks for 30 years'.

    Maybe he was from the 'if it ain't broke...' school. Dunno. I do know that his playing deepened in later years---in sound, spacing, asymmetry. And there was one significant change: a lifelong love of classical music that was always front and center in his writing moved up in his playing. He loved, for example, Bartok. Eddie Diehl used to say that when Jimmy stayed with him briefly he would talk obsessively about Bartok, and how he wanted to play like he wrote. I know he started ending pieces (like the live Darn That Dream from Tokyo) with a quote from (I think) Petrouchka---and I could be dead wrong attribution-wise, but I've heard that exact passage in a Bartok piece. I know he talked as much about classical influences as jazz the few times we got together for lessons (and when he stayed with Tim Whalen in summer of '80, for the festival he played with Getz).

    I think he did go somewhat afield from his early reputation as a successful Charlie Parker guitar interpreter with his own additions to that language.

    Young radicals and fellow travelers, if they live long enough, are one day labeled 'conservatives'. Isn't that lovely?
    Jimmy was so good at what he did...if anybody thinks him playing "long ago and far way" in 1990 something was tired shit, they're a damn fool.

    I say "you play it then, slowhand"

  13. #12

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    That's why the wag said 'talk is cheap'...

  14. #13

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    I'm a huge fan of Jimmy Raney and kick myself every day because I live just an hour's drive from Louisville Ky where Raney lived and never went to hear him when I had the chance. Stupid.

    I spent several years on this forum learning about 8 of the solos in Jimmy's Aebersold volume 20. It was the best thing I've ever done for my melodic playing. We worked so slowly, 4 measures a week! That first solo I crept along so awkwardly, and these days I'm learning Charlie Parker material from the Omnibook--that's how helpful those Raney solos were! They created in my mind a different sense of how a line lays over the form of the song, gave new rhythmic patterns to play with, and in general it was like doing a solid physical workout every day. I still play 6 or 7 of those solos every week and they are still fun, When I play them, my amp thinks it has been sold to a real guitar player.

    I love Raney's music from all periods of his career equally, but I know there are people who prefer early Raney or later Raney, and I can see why they do in each case. No disagreement, I am just one of those people who likes it all and doesn't want to choose one or the other!

    I always felt Doug Raney really took his dad's style and advanced it. There is something just amazing about Doug Raney's huge tone and perfect technique that completely blows me away. I miss them both deeply.

  15. #14

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    Nice to see the love and appreciation...