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  1. #1

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    The commercial DVD of this is permanently out of print (Joe Pass: An Evening with Joe Pass: Guitar DVD: Joe Pass). Many of you probably have seen this before. I'd only seen various short clips of it but I just realized that it's on Youtube in full. If you haven't seen it already:
    Last edited by Tal_175; 08-28-2019 at 10:08 PM.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2
    It's amazing, he is going directly to PA and his tone is exceptional both with the band and solo (e.g. 1:21:30). I guess it's a good room too.
    Last edited by Tal_175; 08-28-2019 at 10:22 AM.

  4. #3

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    I got that DVD way back when it first came out and it's a true feast for any admirer of Joe. He's fully aware of his cancer and the brevity of his upcoming days. He's still at the top of his game, having a lot of fun playing and interacting with the musicians, and the interview is incredibly transparent and vulnerable in places.

    I love the interaction that takes place as they warm up over "That's Earl, Brother," which clearly the musicians only barely know! Joe could fetch up some pretty obscure tunes and give them a fresh performance.

    The first chorus of "Satin Doll" was transcribed in the booklet that came with the DVD and is well worth learning. It has some great lines that are easy to "port" to other settings.

    Thanks for reminding us of this fantastic encounter with Joe.
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175 View Post
    It's amazing, he is going directly to PA and his tone is exceptional both with the band and solo (see 1:21:30 for exp.). I guess it's a good room too.
    Going direct was his habit in the last several years of his life. Of course, at Musicians Institute I expect he had a great sound system and a very good person sitting at the board! You also hear him asking a few things about the sound.

    Funny how Joe Diorio brings a glass of water to Joe Pass!
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  6. #5
    I didn't know he knew he was dying at that point. That makes it even more fascinating to watch.

  7. #6
    It's also interesting that his break down of how he simplifies tunes is very similar to Barry Harris's approach.

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175 View Post
    I didn't know he knew he was dying at that point. That makes it even more fascinating to watch.
    Yes he died in May 1994, and 1994 is the copyright date on the DVD set! He was on a plateau and about to really come crashing down shortly after that performance.
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  9. #8

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    Wow. Just wonderful!

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzstdnt View Post
    Wow. Just wonderful!
    I love his rh and lh technique. Just clean and economical. Never seems to have to stretch or reach for a note, always seems already to be where he needs to be.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone View Post
    I love his rh and lh technique. Just clean and economical. Never seems to have to stretch or reach for a note, always seems already to be where he needs to be.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    yeah, I can remember buying his VHS video back in the day. It was full of his humor too, he'd start to show you something and next thing you know he'd be off in Joe-land improvising, then he'd catch himself and apologize, iirc. But I remember him saying something along the lines of keep it simple, you don't need to play hard stretches, super fast runs, etc to be convincing. He said something like, "I don't like to play anything too hard" …. I think that's someone's tagline on this forum.

  12. #11

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    I've watched this video a few times over the years. One thing that stuck with me is Joe's talk about how he and Oscar Peterson had the same harmonic sense that came from the music they heard growing up. I think he also mentions how influential the Nat Cole Trio was.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  13. #12

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    I think this is the video where as he leaves the venue he walks through a group of fans - 'Aah, guitarists - I like guitarists...remember what I said guys, play tunes, always play tunes, that's how you get the girls...'

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by dot75 View Post
    I think this is the video where as he leaves the venue he walks through a group of fans - 'Aah, guitarists - I like guitarists...remember what I said guys, play tunes, always play tunes, that's how you get the girls...'
    Right. The actual quote is something like "you never get the girls by playing scales" IIRC
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  15. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone View Post
    ... "you never get the girls by playing scales" IIRC
    Hmmm. Food for thought.
    Last edited by Tal_175; 09-08-2019 at 06:59 AM.

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon View Post
    yeah, I can remember buying his VHS video back in the day. It was full of his humor too, he'd start to show you something and next thing you know he'd be off in Joe-land improvising, then he'd catch himself and apologize, iirc. But I remember him saying something along the lines of keep it simple, you don't need to play hard stretches, super fast runs, etc to be convincing. He said something like, "I don't like to play anything too hard" …. I think that's someone's tagline on this forum.
    Watching Joe Pass I notice: he does not prop his hand when he uses the pick but has a very strong common-sense alternating approach. Sometimes it's easier not to alternate, so he doesn't. Holds the pick in the very traditional grip, fingers together, mainly wrist. Economy of movement. FIngerstyle, again, no propping. Not quite classical positioning, but definitely not the usual finger style positions we see in country, bluegrass, folks, or other modern finger style playing. Seems to be mainly free strokes, again great economy of movement.

    Left hand thumb is always placed text-book correctly for modern non-classical style, maybe even for classical. No hooking over the neck, for example (not that it's wrong, he just never seems to do it). Always seems to be playing notes easily in the 5-6 fret zone where his hand is. Shifts position rather than stretching or reaching (typically that is, of course, exceptions exist). Seems always to know the notes right under his fingers, knows his chord shapes but doesn't really seem to be stuck on them. They are references not boundaries. Very, very strong hammer/slur technique that almost sounds like picking.

    All this impresses me somehow. I love watching Joe play almost as much as I love listening. He really makes it look like the guitar is an extension of himself. No gyrating, grimacing (okay, not much grimacing), doesn't seem in pain, no "what's that smell" expression. No "I practiced hours every day in hard-core dedication to be able to do this" vibe. Hard to see any real technical limit to his ability to express his ideas on the guitar.
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  17. #16

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    Thanks for sharing! Amazing video! "Don't ask about modes". Made my day! ... maybe my life!

  18. #17

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    Beautiful! Will have to give this my full attention when I have a chance.

    I like what he says at the 13:30 mark..."I don't like to rehearse." With Oscar Peterson he only rehearsed TWICE...

    Man, that says a lot about the talent of those guys.

    He has also been quoted as saying he doesn't like to practice...he would start out playing some scales and songs, and then pick up the paper and sit on the couch and read. The article actually referred to him as a couch potato. Wish I could find his couch...
    “Without music, life would be a mistake”--Friedrich Nietzsche

    Current lineup: Gibson ES-135 ('02), Peerless Sunset, Harmony Brilliant Cutaway ('64), Godin 5th Avenue, Alvarez AC60 A/E classical, Kay K37 ('56), Fender Squier VM Jazz bass, several ukes. Amps: Fishman Artist, Fender SCXD, Pignose 7-100.

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff View Post
    He has also been quoted as saying he doesn't like to practice...he would start out playing some scales and songs, and then pick up the paper and sit on the couch and read. The article actually referred to him as a couch potato. Wish I could find his couch...
    He said more than once he'd done enough practising as a kid....

  20. #19

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    Does anyone happen to know why Gibson never put that guitar into production as their "Joe Pass" model?? I just love it. Can't believe it wouldn't be a big seller. Even in today's market.
    Last edited by Bob P.; 08-29-2019 at 10:52 PM.

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone View Post
    I love his rh and lh technique. Just clean and economical. Never seems to have to stretch or reach for a note, always seems already to be where he needs to be.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Yeah, that right hand technique is something else. Have you ever seen anyone else with that kind of a picking style? I don't think I have. He balls up his hand into a fist-like posture and his upstrokes are as strong and clear as his downstrokes. Truly something to emulate, if one can.

    I wish Troy Grady had been around to film his technique.

  22. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob P. View Post
    Does anyone happen to why Gibson never put that guitar into production as their "Joe Pass" model?? I just love it. Can't believe it wouldn't be a big seller. Even in today's market.
    Yeah that's a shame. But I guess it's specs is pretty much Sadowsky Jim Hall. Narrower depth ES 175 with the neck pickup moved up near the neck.

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175 View Post
    Yeah that's a shame. But I guess it's specs is pretty much Sadowsky Jim Hall. Narrower depth ES 175 with the neck pickup moved up near the neck.
    If only Heritage made something like that
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  24. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    If only Heritage made something like that
    True, but I thought 575 was carved, not laminate no?

  25. #24

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    I am not sure of this and I'm not about to go look, but I think I recall that there was an issue of Just Jazz Guitar in which Joe Pass was playing in Europe, maybe Germany, and had occasion to use a Heritage Sweet 16. It was just after that when Gibson made him a (relatively) thin ES175 with the pickup near the neck.

    So this, at the moment, is unsubstantiated recollection; take it for what it's worth.

  26. #25

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    Never heard Joe scat-singing before! (1:03:30). Interesting that he espouses the ‘You should be able to sing/hear what you play’ approach.

  27. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop View Post
    Never heard Joe scat-singing before! (1:03:30). Interesting that he espouses the ‘You should be able to sing/hear what you play’ approach.
    Martin Taylor* tells of running into Joe in a bookshop in Australia & being invited to stop by JP's workshop at the local Music School the next day.

    Joe stopped a student mid solo & asked him to sing the phrase he'd just played, when he couldn't - & couldn't play it again either, let alone play the line up and down the neck he was politely asked if he was playing the guitar or was the guitar playing him. He makes a similar point during the Q&A at the end of this video.

    *My introduction to MT was hearing him supporting JP at the Union Chapel in London years ago - they played some duets at the end which I'm listening to with my coffee as I type...way to start the day.

  28. #27
    I think JP's custom ES 175 had a thin neck (not narrow). His original ES 175 was one of those early 60's (62-64 I think) very thin profile models. Unlike most people he liked it. I also find thin necks comfortable and fast.

  29. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop View Post
    Never heard Joe scat-singing before! (1:03:30). Interesting that he espouses the ‘You should be able to sing/hear what you play’ approach.
    Herb Ellis said in his instructional DVD that Joe Pass did that. Oscar Peterson does it audibly on many of his records. Herb said Wes did it too. In fact, he (Herb) said every jazz guitarist that he knew (and liked) did it. He also said horn players do it but you can't tell because they have a horn in their mouths.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  30. #29

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    Joe Pass was amazing, no doubt about it! He's also one of my biggest regrets as well, as I regret I never saw him in person!! Funny story I have about different guitar players. I was playing with a rock guitarist once and I didn't even bring up the subject of Joe Pass, he did. He told me he hated Joe Pass and he hated when people would applaud him after his solos! I thought it was strange but then when I thought about it afterwards, I chalked it up to him not understanding jazz and being a closed minded fool. Strange mofo's out there, needless to say that was the first and only time I played guitars with the guy.

  31. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175 View Post
    True, but I thought 575 was carved, not laminate no?
    It is, but it's a thick top, honestly it's stiffer and more feedback resistant than most 175's!
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  32. #31

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    If i'm reading the Heritage web site correctly, they're not making 575's right now.

  33. #32

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    This is one of the greatest music videos I saw in my entire life, thank you ..!



  34. #33

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    Thanks for that. Really amazing!
    Explore the new possibility learning music using The Emoji System from the Jonathan Levin Guitar Institute

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NfTJCfSjoAc

  35. #34

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    I've been listening to some of those recordings as individual tune videos for years, didn't actually know of this DVD of the entire concert. Thanks for posting. This is perhaps my favorite Joe Pass, not just him but the band is excellent and it's a great recording. The tone of that acoustic bass, wow, and the player sure knows how to listen. Same for the drums.
    B+
    Frank (aka fep)

  36. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by fep View Post
    The tone of that acoustic bass, wow, and the player sure knows how to listen.
    Bob Magnusson worked with many of the best. (I have a video of him with Herb Ellis that I love.)
    Here is a bit more about him, in his own words. Seriously, this guy got around!



    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  37. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    Bob Magnusson worked with many of the best. (I have a video of him with Herb Ellis that I love.)
    Here is a bit more about him, in his own words. Seriously, this guy got around!



    And yet even he seemed momentarily thrown by "That's Earl, Brother." It's fun to really listen to his comments when Joe hands him the chart and says it's a Dizzy Gillespie tune, used to have an intro but he forgot it, etc.

    Joe could really call obscure but delightful tunes.
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  38. #37
    Another JP freebee thanks to youtube (another out of print dvd):

  39. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175 View Post
    Another JP freebee thanks to youtube (another out of print dvd):
    That opening blues is transcribed in the book/CD Joe Pass: On Guitar. (Includes performances of ATTYA and Stella, IIRC). It's a good look at how Joe thought and played. Lots of examples.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  40. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    Bob Magnusson worked with many of the best. (I have a video of him with Herb Ellis that I love.)
    Here is a bit more about him, in his own words. Seriously, this guy got around!
    The way I understand it he has retired from playing now due to osteo arthritis. For all I know he might still be surfing though! I was so lucky to be able to hire Bob Magnusson for studio stuff (including jazz!) a couple times. He has always been the greatest player with the greatest sound IMO, and is a nice, unassuming gentleman with plenty of fun stories to tell indeed!

  41. #40

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    This is worth a watch too - useful takeaway I got was to refrain from putting motor oil on your fretboard....

    Watch A Not So Average Joe | Prime Video