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  1. #1

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    >>>In his notes for the collection, guitarist Nick Rossi notes that [Oscar] Moore’s synthesis of such influences as George van Eps, Dick McDonough, Django Reinhardt, and Charlie Christian led to his “groundbreaking style, one which provided a template for how the guitar functions in a modern jazz setting.”<<<<<

    Would like to hear this material.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  4. #3

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    Oscar Moore is an overlooked giant, and the Nat Cole trio one of the most influential groups in the history of jazz.... looking forward to this one!

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    On my list - isn't this the group that made piano guitar bass trio's a thing ? Predating Oscar Peterson's groups etc...

    Oscar Moore quit the music scene after this & ended up working as a maintenance man (?)...

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by dot75 View Post
    On my list - isn't this the group that made piano guitar bass trio's a thing ? Predating Oscar Peterson's groups etc...

    Oscar Moore quit the music scene after this & ended up working as a maintenance man (?)...
    I think so, yes. They were hugely important, Nat as a pianist and a vocalist. (I've read that when the band started out, Nat only sang now and then, mostly novelty tunes, as a change of pace. It's ironic that be became more famous as a singer. His piano playing had a big influence on Ray Charles, among others. They were a great group.)

    I don't think Oscar Peterson's trio came along until the early '50s.

    As for Oscar quitting, I've read that when Nat became a bigger deal, the powers that be wanted to pay Oscar as a sideman, not as an equal. I think that's what he rejected. (Perhaps he regretted that decision later, I don't know.)
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  7. #6

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    A 43-minute sampling.

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  8. #7

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    I have a 5 CD set of this Trio of recordings made in the early 40s and a quick review indicates this new set contains those recordings BUT a whole lot more.

    Moore's solos are always melodic with a warm 'happy' sound to them. Combined with Nat's singing and piano and the solid bass support these recordings have always been my desert island choice; I don't think there was another trio that musically had more to offer.

    Also the songs have major blues influences and are very hip for their time. E.g. Just Another Blues;


  9. #8

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    Oscar Moore has always been my "ideal" jazz guitarist. I enjoy many others, especially Pass, but Moore just has a sound and feel I always love to hear.

    Read up on him, and when the NKC Trio broke up, well ... jazz guitarist wasn't always a well or consistent paying gig. So he went into being a bricklaying contractor to make an assured and decent living.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

  10. #9

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    Yes, the Nat “King” Cole trio was the influence behind Oscar Peterson’s original piano-bass-guitar trio, as well as Ahmad Jamal’s first trio and even Ray Charles. I believe Peterson’s trio started in 1949-50 when he replaced a drummer with former Cole guitarist Irving Ashby.

    Around 1952, Ashby was replaced by Barney Kessel, who in turn was replaced by Herb Ellis (a/k/a the classic OP trio). Sometime early on, Kenny Burrell subbed for Ellis for while on when Herb went off to deal with his struggles with alcohol. (Herb talks about it here:
    Jazz Profiles: Herb Ellis: 1921-2010 A Tribute

    John Galich
    Last edited by jmgalich; 07-20-2019 at 03:14 PM. Reason: adding link

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by jmgalich View Post
    Around 1952, Ashby was replaced by Barney Kessel, who in turn was replaced by Herb Ellis (a/k/a the classic OP trio). Sometime early on, Kenny Burrell subbed for Ellis for while on when Herb went off to deal with his struggles with alcohol. (Herb talks about it here:
    Jazz Profiles: Herb Ellis: 1921-2010 A Tribute
    Great article! Thank you for posting that. Made my day!
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  12. #11

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    I think that Oscar Moore is probably why I played jazz guitar. My dad was a big NKC fan and had a lot of those early records, which I grew up listening to every Sunday. Just fantastic stuff.
    Beauty is as close to terror as we can well endure. -Rainer Maria Rilke

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    A 43-minute sampling.

    This accompanied my commute today, what a treat! Looking forward to hearing more.

  14. #13

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    This new NKC is another important project from Resonance. But, I would be reluctant to recommend it to start your NKC collection. Similarly, the career spanning box set of Cole's Capital recordings are not the best introduction for jazz listeners.

    There are some excellent collections of the Cole Trio Capital recordings (study the All Music discography). That's the place to start, IMO.

  15. #14

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    "Similarly, the career spanning box set of Cole's Capital recordings are not the best introduction for jazz listeners."

    If you mean the Mosaic set, I have that one. Like all Mosaic box sets it's superb in every way, from the recordings to the extensive booklet. 18 CD's of the pure trio bliss from beginning to end.
    I listened to it a ton when I got it, probably time to dig it out again.

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Elliott View Post
    . But, I would be reluctant to recommend it to start your NKC collection..
    Why?

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Neverisky View Post
    Why?
    To add Nat King Cole trio to your jazz collection, I would not recommend:

    (1) the upcoming Resonance box set. It is rather expensive (about $100) and it covers a period before the classic Cole trio work on Capitol.

    (2) the 4-CD Nat King Cole box set on Capitol which has some of the classic trio pieces but is mainly about Cole the popular singer

    (3) the Mosaic Nat King Cole Trio box set. It's wonderful, but it's massive, rare and hard to find. Even used, it looks to cost $400.

    The Nat King Cole Trio I would recommend to start with

    (1) NKCT, The Instrumental Classics
    (2) NKCT, The Vocal Classics, 1942-1946
    (3) NKCT, The Vocal Classics, 1947-1950



    You can find these CDs used at a very reasonable price.

    There is lots of great Oscar Moore playing on the vocal hits CDs.

    OR

    5-CD set from Laserlight

    I think this overlaps with the Capitol set and might set you back about $25.

    On the other hand, if you are a big Cole trio fan and have the Capitol basics covered, you should definitely consider the new, upcoming Resonance set.