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  1. #1

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    The big band I sometimes sit in with does a series of concerts with the great Philip Catherine (for that occasion they understandably don’t need a second guitar player ;-). They rehearsed today. Philip brought his Godin. I was a bit surprised to see the stickers he is using as position markers.... (but his playing was great!)


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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Phillip is a current fave - his Cole Porter album is really nice....

  4. #3

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    I have that Cole Porter album - it's wonderful.

    In some on-stage lighting situations, having big white stickers for fret markers helps a lot...as I know to my embarrassment!

  5. #4

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    Looks like Philip got some pretty wood on his Godin's neck...

    As for the stickers, I've played some dark places where I could barely see my guitar, so if it works, it works.

    Philip's playing is always excellent...tasteful, daring, swinging. An absolute favorite of mine.

  6. #5

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    be nice if someone got him some of these neck dot type stickers

    cheap and readily available


    Philip Catherine-fm-smallcustomdot_2048x2048-jpg

    great player..first became hip to him in 70's via larry coryell!!

    cheers

  7. #6

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    I play a Gretsch thin hollow guitar, and the fret markers are a bit difficult to see in the dark. I used to play a fancy steakhouse/martini bar almost every weekend, and they liked to keep the stage pretty dark. When I was having to read a tune, even just changes, I had a really hard time keeping my place on the fretboard because I couldn't really see it that well peripherally. For that and several other reasons I won't go into that wasn't the most fun gig ever.

  8. #7

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    Wow! I've never seen anyone do that before but it obviously works for Philip.

    I guess playing a classical guitar with no neck markers for so long kind of got me to the point where I don't need them.

    Regards,
    Steven Herron
    Learn To Play Chord Melody Guitar

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    be nice if someone got him some of these neck dot type stickers

    cheap and readily available


    Philip Catherine-fm-smallcustomdot_2048x2048-jpg

    great player..first became hip to him in 70's via larry coryell!!

    cheers
    Seeing the fingerboard in the dark can be a huge problem when doing pit work playing musicals.
    I did the The Who's "Tommy" over the summer, and there are no breaks going from one number to the next. There are tons of modulations within each number, and everything is done at pretty quick tempos, with the guitar featured 100% of the time.

    If you can't use your peripheral vision when you're reading the music because it's too dark, you're shot. I had to use some glow-in-the- dark gel on the higher frets of my Parker P-44 to get me through the more difficult numbers.
    Do those dots glow in the dark? Where can you find them? TIA

  10. #9

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    s- amazon sells'em

    https://www.amazon.com/Fretboard-Mar.../dp/B00PGQYQJY

    more choices-

    Small Custom Dots 1/8" For Fret Side Markers – Inlay Stickers Jockomo

    Rosette Ivory Dot Fret Markers (Small Size) pack of 12


    don't know about glow in dark..reflective tho!..stew mac has actual dot material that supposedly glows in the dark and it got very bad reviews...

    cheers

  11. #10

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    Could also just be that transitioning from the 175 that had large split parallelogram Fretboard markers to the smaller dots of the Godin means a little modification was necessary. Iirc, his old Les Paul was a Custom with the full size block inlays, too. Both Gibson’s would have been very visible compared to the Godin.

    what a thrill to see him rehearse! A wonderful player.

  12. #11

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    Philip travels without and amp so the big band had to provide him an amp. Here’s his list of amps he finds acceptable:

    1 GUITAR AMP - You can choose between the following :
    - Fender Deluxe Reverb
    - AER Acousticube 2 ou 3 (100 watts)
    - Trace Elliot Acoustic TAB 100 ( but not TA 100)
    - Marshall JCM 2000 Triple Super lead
    - Peavey KB / A 100
    - Peavy Bandit 112
    - Polytone Minibrut II, III ou IV (100 Watts)
    (are NOT accepted :Fender Twin Reverb or Roland.Jazz Chorus)

    And here’s a vid of the rehearsal (sorry, only accessible thru facebook):

    Repetitie 29 november 2018 met Philip... - West Coast Big Band | Facebook

  13. #12

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    He is a tasteful and masterful player!

    I used to put stickers on lutes...

    but I felt annoyed with it eventually I got over it... but I did some special focus on it..
    I really thought I did not look at the fretboard untill occasionally I picked a guitar with no dots at all anywhere...

    I think the best thing that helps to overcome it is playing in positions - I mean you can do whatever you want - stretching or sliding or whtever - but if you had sometime specifically on positions that helps blind orientation the best.

    Disclaimer: that does not make anyone a good player... as well as the opposite.. I am almost sure Wes could not really play blind...))))

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Jay
    Philip travels without and amp so the big band had to provide him an amp. Here’s his list of amps he finds acceptable:

    1 GUITAR AMP - You can choose between the following :
    - Fender Deluxe Reverb
    - AER Acousticube 2 ou 3 (100 watts)
    - Trace Elliot Acoustic TAB 100 ( but not TA 100)
    - Marshall JCM 2000 Triple Super lead
    - Peavey KB / A 100
    - Peavy Bandit 112
    - Polytone Minibrut II, III ou IV (100 Watts)
    (are NOT accepted :Fender Twin Reverb or Roland.Jazz Chorus)

    Wow! That's a surprise.....

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by TOMMO
    Wow! That's a surprise.....
    Haha, yes I was surprised too!

    And even more by the clear statement a Twin Reverb is NOT accepted!

  16. #15

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    I suspect it's because in order for a Twin to sound any good, you have to turn it up to louder than would sound good in most stage environments. Philip is a pro, he plays to serve the music, not his own ego...he amplifies only to be heard, not to overpower.

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont
    I suspect it's because in order for a Twin to sound any good, you have to turn it up to louder than would sound good in most stage environments.
    That's why I never got a Twin Reverb....

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by TOMMO
    That's why I never got a Twin Reverb....
    A Twin with master volume solves that problem for me. But then there’s the weight.

  19. #18

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    Wow! How have I not heard him before. Someone on the Chet Baker thread posted the record below with him on it and I was immediately drawn to his playing. Someone school me on what other albums to check out


  20. #19

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    One of my favorite players.

    The three records he did with Tom Harell are amazing-- I remember you (which is a tribute to Chet) and Moods volume 1 and 2. Just outstanding music, and beautifully recorded.

  21. #20

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    He made a good duo record called Twin House, with Larry Coryell:


  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop
    He made a good duo record called Twin House, with Larry Coryell:
    I listened to that album a lot in the ‘80s. I had no idea how two people could possibly play like that. Now I at least have an idea. I’ll put it back on my playlist.

  23. #22

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    Catherine did an album with Dexter Gordon; Something Different. It is called that since the 'difference' is that Gordon is playing with a guitar trio instead of a piano trio. Since there is no piano to get-in-the-way Catherine's comping can be heard well and he really 'pushes' Gordon (not that he needed any, ha ha). Anyhow fine solos by all and great interplay.

    Summer Night is a more recent Catherine effort. Nice album.
    Last edited by jameslovestal; 06-05-2019 at 02:58 PM.

  24. #23

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    I often listen to Philip Catherine Plays Cole Porter - a wonderful album.

  25. #24

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    I used to play Dance for Victor a lot back in the day, great song. The chord changes are a bit challenging for improv, but a lot of fun.


  26. #25

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    A very versatile player, he also played with Focus:


  27. #26

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  28. #27

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  29. #28

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    He was on a few Kenny Drew albums that are worth having IMHO.

  30. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by lammie200
    He was on a few Kenny Drew albums that are worth having IMHO.

    I have all of those Stepplechase recordings and they are first rate. Drew and Catherine don't step on each other and of course NHOP keeps it all together.


  31. #30
    I love all of the Philip Catherine discs with Kenny Drew and NHOP.

    But the duets with Bireli are my favorites. In addition to the I'll Remember April tune posted above, there's this one with Aladar Pege on bass.

    Philip has the sweetest tone, and Bireli is so utterly inventive.


  32. #31

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    I consider very myself fortunate to have discovered and purchase a Philip Catherine album called Nairam from the $2.99 cut-out bin at a record store back in 1976. It was a Warner release compiled from tunes off of September Man and Guitars. I didn't have a clue who he was, but the notes on the album back convinced me to buy it.

    Damn, that was how you did it back before the internet. Nobody I knew had ever heard about him in '76 when I was first venturing into jazz. I'd been listening to fusion, because that's what 20 something guitarists were doing. Dropped the needle on that record and 2 sides later, my jaw was hanging open. It was one of those serendipitous moments, when you knew that you had heard something very important, and you'd be the one that would be turning your musical peers onto something new and amazing.

    It was so fresh and current, and as a fusion player, he was on par or hipper than all the early fusion cats I was hearing then...Abercrombie, McLaughlin, Corryell, Khan, Beck, Bolin, Conners, etc. It was only later, after the fusion thing cooled off and the internet became available that I fully understood what an accomplished bop and straight ahead player he was. What a talent. He was a huge early influence on me to keep at the guitar and jazz. A musical hero.

    Here's a taste of what I heard 44 years ago, still relevant today.



  33. #32

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    My first experience with Catherine was with the record he made with Larry Coryell “Splendid.” I found this album in a cutout bin back in the mid-80s.




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  34. #33

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    Philip Catherine made this album with Grappelli, Coryell and NHOP.

    When I first purchased the album I assumed the title was a reference to Coryell but, duh, it was the European Catherine.


  35. #34

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    for more ,Informactions ,E_mail ,me , fabiodrummy@gmail.com ,
    copiato-1- CHET BAKER .,tr Live in Hilversum.,1980 - Trio.., Philip Catherine .,cht. + JeanLouis Rossinfoss?.,cb 1980- t.4,,vd.1232,-

  36. #35

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    I love Philip. I got the chance to watch him in Belgium where he is from, after the Cole Porter album release. A true master. Guitars two is my favorite album. Very fresh and poetic music. Nothing to see with the fusion recordings he is best known for though.

    Envoyé de mon SM-G930F en utilisant Tapatalk

  37. #36

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    Please check the full album and let me know what you think …..

  38. #37

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    This Video is from my own *,Concerts, Jazz festivals,* collections.,!!. Here is another Live jazz festival from Italy..: PHILIP CATHERINE,cht,.TRIO Live at ''SanRemo'' - Italia Jazz Festival ,1986., Aldo Romano,.dr ,,cb,.?? t,.22'.,vd,1169,3.,- ,

  39. #38

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    Three or Four Shades of Blue by Mingus. It has Catherine, Coryell and Scofield on it and is one of the greatest guitar albums ever. Catherine’s solo on Goodbye Porkpie Hat is especially good.

  40. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo
    I consider very myself fortunate to have discovered and purchase a Philip Catherine album called Nairam from the $2.99 cut-out bin at a record store back in 1976. It was a Warner release compiled from tunes off of September Man and Guitars. I didn't have a clue who he was, but the notes on the album back convinced me to buy it.

    Damn, that was how you did it back before the internet. Nobody I knew had ever heard about him in '76 when I was first venturing into jazz. I'd been listening to fusion, because that's what 20 something guitarists were doing. Dropped the needle on that record and 2 sides later, my jaw was hanging open. It was one of those serendipitous moments, when you knew that you had heard something very important, and you'd be the one that would be turning your musical peers onto something new and amazing.

    It was so fresh and current, and as a fusion player, he was on par or hipper than all the early fusion cats I was hearing then...Abercrombie, McLaughlin, Corryell, Khan, Beck, Bolin, Conners, etc. It was only later, after the fusion thing cooled off and the internet became available that I fully understood what an accomplished bop and straight ahead player he was. What a talent. He was a huge early influence on me to keep at the guitar and jazz. A musical hero.

    Here's a taste of what I heard 44 years ago, still relevant today.



    Unbelievable. Honestly, your entire post.... word for word, it could’ve been written by me. Same exact story, the dates, etc. The amazing impact of that album, yes, even on the first listen. Wow, what an album, right?

    His playing, his tone, the compositions, his phrasing and that distinctive touch.... Philip Catherine is definitely one guitarist I can always manage to identify within just a few notes, and he is certainly one of my favorite jazz players of all.

    A few years later, I was SO lucky to see Philip at My Father’s Place on Long Island, teamed with Larry Coryell on their Back Together Again USA tour with Alphonse Mouzon. Not only did they perform most of that album, including Catherine’s fantastic, frenzied, fusion composition ‘Transvested Express’, but Philip was also given the leader spotlight that evening, performing ‘Homecomings’ and ‘Nairam’. Unfortunately, at least to the best of my knowledge, it seems that he has rarely toured the USA, so I consider myself lucky to have been there that night.

    Thanks for sharing your memories. Definitely a huge musical influence and hero for me, too!

  41. #40

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    BTW, if you’re as big a fan of the earlier fusionesque direction of Philip’s Nairam period as I am, check out this track on YouTube, ‘Angel Wings’. Phew! The entire song simply drives along between shades of delicacy light and churning darkness, and his solo always leaves me kinda breathless between its nonstop inventiveness and energy.

    Last edited by ooglybong; 02-26-2020 at 10:40 PM.