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  1. #51

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    People talkin' "guitar like Coltrane's approach" and no one mentions Allan Holdsworth, possibly the most Coltrane inspired guitarist and one who can "rage" on the instrument.






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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

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    For me, he's the first to come to mind.

    Dug the Linc Chamberland videos. Wasn't familiar with him.


    Quote Originally Posted by Cunamara
    People talkin' "guitar like Coltrane's approach" and no one mentions Allan Holdsworth, possibly the most Coltrane inspired guitarist and one who can "rage" on the instrument.






  4. #53

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    i was really lucky to tour with sonny sharrok
    he was an incredable person to work for , just a beautiful personality , and really funny...i miss him a lot

    im not sure if anyone has mentioned pete cosey , but, he could get out there, and still do the electric mud session

    ryo kawasaki could hit a trane intensity

    there are plenty of good people who arnt as well know who can come from there

  5. #54

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    I totally love Sonny Sharrock and I am so glad his name keeps coming up. Even though I can appreciate all the older players nothing until the early 60's really holds up for me.
    Seize The Rainbow | Bill Laswell
    Guitar players who played with/or like Coltrane or Ornette Coleman-sonny-jpg

  6. #55

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    Quote Originally Posted by bonsritmos
    i was really lucky to tour with sonny sharrok
    he was an incredable person to work for , just a beautiful personality , and really funny...i miss him a lot

    im not sure if anyone has mentioned pete cosey , but, he could get out there, and still do the electric mud session
    yeah i got pete c mention in ^...him and sonny..two early out theres

    here's great archived recording of sonny & linda from wkcr nyc 1974

    Sonny And Linda Sharrock - Live WKCR : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive

    cheers

  7. #56

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    thanks for the link, and thanks to anyone who mentioned sonny also , he was a really great guy

    i was hired by sonny in the early eihties , there were some gigs around new york and a tour in france and switzerland and a demo



    here is one cut with him in paris i did, with a surprising melodic ballad , yet, i think you could say his phrasing is very uncharactoristic of a standard jazz aproach and falls into a trane ornette thing

    no matter what he did, he was himself and has his own voice

  8. #57

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    Quote Originally Posted by VanEpsInDeChirico
    I’ve always felt that jazz guitarists often had a collective obsession with clean playing that restricted their ability to rage and sound wild. No one for example, ever seems have slammed their pick across a string the way Monk slammed his fingers into the piano keys. No one ever pushed notes to the point where they sound like they are going to burst out of their musicality and become living bird calls like Dolphy. Jazz guitar is always very beautiful and not particularly abrasive and intense. This certainly makes for very nice ballads. I think often ballads sound much nicer with a guitar than piano. Especially when backing up a singer the way Kessel did with Julie London. There’s a great Chet Baker/Burrell duet called “You’re Mine You.” Stunning guitar sound. But yeah, sweetness in jazz is its strong point. As a guitarist, it is a frustrating limitation. Blues guitar is where the instrument has excelled at raging. I love it. But in that case, the harmonic simplicity and simplicity of form leaves me wanting more. To the extent that jazz guitar ever did rage, it was often in recordings that border on not really being jazz. Check out Kessel’s solo on “The Peanut Vendor.” Its pretty raging and I love it, but its hardly pushing the boundaries of modern jazz harmonically or compositionally. Its essentially a commercial jazz recording. I always thought Kessel was really good at raging when he wanted to be and wished he’d gone more often in that direction. Kenny Burrell’s solo on Gil Evans version of “Time of the Barracudas” is kind of raging, but it almost has more to do with the fact that Elvin Jones is playing like a maniac behind him on the drums. Also, absolutely has a listen to George Benson on "The Cooker." Raging! But again, its almost a soul blues number rather than jazz.


    As far as some of the more post-modern (70s and beyond) guitarists go….I don’t know….even when they are pushing boundaries it all feels quite clinical, academic, and technique obsessed at the expense of soul to me.
    Well said. I kind of wish there were more players who had the grit and blues of B.B. or Freddie, but applied Trane's harmony and facility.
    Scofield can do it, Stern too, and others but there's still a kind of reticence in their playing.

    Sharrock and McLaughlin are sophisticated ragers (and much more) for sure in my book.

    "Jazz Guitar" has always seemed hard for me to completely swallow. It's odd because Charlie Christian and a lot of early guys had a healthy dose of grit in their tone.
    So much of "Jazz Guitar" seems dominated by white guys, and many only ended up adopting distortion and more bluesy oriented tone when they heard British white guys playing it.

  9. #58

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    i think you are absolutly correct about scofeild and stern...it sure is out of the trane / miles modal school . its cleaner than sharrok. i played with both of those guys too, but not as intimite as with sonny...they might not even remember the gig...stern didnt, and he was real nice when i talked to him maybe 30 years later, but, i sure rememberd it , and , scofeild was a side man with micheal wolff and alex foster , subbing for barry finnerty and they gave me my first gig in new york , so for me its unforgettable. i kept in touch with alex and mike.

    but as i read your post, for sure you have to give them props for being modal trane jazz killers...and there are others, i just cant call them off my head

  10. #59

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    I like Kevin O'Neil's playing on Anthony Braxton's Standards Quartet recordings, with some fun takes on Coltrane tunes




    great version of 'inchworm' too..

  11. #60

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    Robert fripp / King crimson works in that energy level

  12. #61

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    John McLaughlin dedicated a CD named After The Rain to Trane's Quartets After the Rain (John McLaughlin album) - Wikipedia

    he was touring with the same stellar trio too.

  13. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by man-argentina
    Hi, thanks, Sonny Bono seems bad ass, gonna check it.

    Thanks to both.
    Actually, Cher was more avant-garde, Bono was more Irish rock-star.

  14. #63

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  15. #64

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  16. #65

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  17. #66

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