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  1. #1

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    What is your favorite Grant Greene album? Why?

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  3. #2

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    Solid.

    Shows a bit of all Grant could do.
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  4. #3

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    Matador has McCoyTyner and Elvin Jones, including a version of My Favorite Things with the guitarist in the Coltrane role.

  5. #4

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    The complete quartets with Sonny Clark and Grant Green. Classic Blue note. Great tunes, great performances and some of the finest playing from Sonny on piano and Grant. Art Blakey on drums. I love the range of tunes and the things the chemistry of these two brought out in each other. It feels like their work is overlooked, but luckily their complete output was collected and reissued on Mosaic and Blue Note reissue.
    David



  6. #5

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    Speaking of which, have you seen the latest issue of JazzTimes? Cover feature is Grant Green, closing page is Ben Monder talking about his most influential guitarists and their music. The guitar issue.

    David

  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by djg View Post
    too many:

    - holy barbarian
    - first stand
    - grantstand
    - reaching out
    - street of dreams
    - here 'tis (donaldson)
    - good gracious (donaldson)
    - latin bit
    - complete sonny clark
    - with gloria coleman
    - complete george braith
    - complete booker ervin-horace parlan
    - live at mintons
    - search for the new land (morgan)
    - workout (mobley)
    - steppin out (vick)
    - green street
    - all the gin is gone (forrest)
    Could you say a little to the OP's question of Why? It'd be helpful for me anyway. Thanks
    David

  8. #7

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    Pretty hard to pick one, but I'll go with Iron City.

    While Grant could play bebop, hard bop, latin, etc., I personally feel that he pioneered the soul jazz / acid jazz idiom that's the inspiration for some of the 'jam' bands of today like Soulive, Lettuce, New Mastersounds, etc. Guitarists like Eric Krasno and Eddie Roberts have styles that come right from the school of Grant Green.

    Here's a track from the album.

    Check out my new book, Essential Skills for the Guitarist on Amazon.

  9. #8

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    I'll go w/Reaching Out. Honorable mention to Idle Moments and Solid.

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by TruthHertz View Post
    The complete quartets with Sonny Clark and Grant Green. Classic Blue note. Great tunes, great performances and some of the finest playing from Sonny on piano and Grant. Art Blakey on drums. I love the range of tunes and the things the chemistry of these two brought out in each other. It feels like their work is overlooked, but luckily their complete output was collected and reissued on Mosaic and Blue Note reissue.
    David


    I agree with what is said here, and all I can add it is has a great mix of standards and Grant blues \ riff based melody tunes. This is a CD I take with me when I travel since there is a lot of music in this 2 CD set.

    PS: I also find this to be a great 'period' for Grant and his playing style. A nice balance in his solos; not repeating too much or using the same riffs and not into that funk period.

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dana View Post
    Pretty hard to pick one, but I'll go with Iron City.

    While Grant could play bebop, hard bop, latin, etc., I personally feel that he pioneered the soul jazz / acid jazz idiom that's the inspiration for some of the 'jam' bands of today like Soulive, Lettuce, New Mastersounds, etc. Guitarists like Eric Krasno and Eddie Roberts have styles that come right from the school of Grant Green.

    Here's a track from the album.

    Put on your red dress baby
    'Cause we're going out tonight
    Put on your red dress baby
    'Cause we're going out tonight
    You better wear some boxing gloves
    In case a fool might wanna fight

    Put on your high-heel sneakers
    Wear your wig hat on your head
    Put on your high-heel sneakers
    Wear your wig hat on your head
    I'm pretty sure now baby
    'Cause you know, you're gonna knock 'em dead

  12. #11

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    Agreed^, this one sums it up for me.

  13. #12

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    Oops - Thought I was responding to complete quartets album post - that's the one for me.

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dana View Post
    Pretty hard to pick one, but I'll go with Iron City.

    While Grant could play bebop, hard bop, latin, etc., I personally feel that he pioneered the soul jazz / acid jazz idiom that's the inspiration for some of the 'jam' bands of today like Soulive, Lettuce, New Mastersounds, etc. Guitarists like Eric Krasno and Eddie Roberts have styles that come right from the school of Grant Green.

    Here's a track from the album.

    I love that record too. I like it now and it would have liked it as a teenager (had I heard it.)
    I think Bill Jennings was also great at this style of music.
    Duke Robillard does a boogaloo version of "Hi Heel Sneakers." Fun tune.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  15. #14

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    Green Street

  16. #15

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    Super tough choice - his body of work is massive! I would have said The Complete Quartets until Funk in France was released and it has captured my imagination. It lacks the Rudy Van Gelder studio production quality, but to hear him playing live - it's captivating - and the tunes cover the span of his career - from his early straight ahead days at Blue Note to funk. I haven't heard Slick yet, but it's on my Christmas list. So are two tickets to the Grant Green Tribute Tour, featuring his son, Grant Green, Jr.

    Last edited by 3rdwaverider; 12-14-2018 at 02:14 AM.

  17. #16

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    I'm going to upset a lot of people and say Live at The Lighthouse. "Windjammer" is just sooooo good.

    On the Turntable: Steve Reich - Phases (box set), Fred Frith Guitar Quartet - Ayaya Moses
    Guitar:
    Fender AVRI '59 w/ TI Swing 11s and Tyson Tone pickups
    Through: Polytone Mini Brute II

  18. #17

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    I love the "Live at the Lighthouse" record. Love Wilton Felder's bass playing on it. So funky. I saw him live around that time. My band plays Jan Jan from this record. And sometimes Windjammer.

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by rmpmcdermott View Post
    I'm going to upset a lot of people and say Live at The Lighthouse. "Windjammer" is just sooooo good.

    Funny but when I was in my early 20s (about 30 years ago), Live at The Lighthouse was the reason my jazz guitar circle (a group of 4 guys that grew up together learning to play jazz guitar), decided to stop listening to Green: We were getting into Joe, Wes, Tal, Jimmy, Kenny, etc,, and while we liked Green's Blue Note recordings we found the playing on this live session to be somewhat pedestrian and over repetitive.

    Of course about 10 years later I re-discovered Green and he is one of my favorites, but I'm still not a fan of this jam \ live session.

    My favorite Green album is that 2 disc set with Sonny Clark (due to the mix of Green blue based original tunes and standards).

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    Solid.

    Shows a bit of all Grant could do.
    It does, and always makes me wonder why he didn't do more bop and less boogooloo
    or "blueboneing"...

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by jameslovestal View Post
    Funny but when I was in my early 20s (about 30 years ago), Live at The Lighthouse was the reason my jazz guitar circle (a group of 4 guys that grew up together learning to play jazz guitar), decided to stop listening to Green: We were getting into Joe, Wes, Tal, Jimmy, Kenny, etc,, and while we liked Green's Blue Note recordings we found the playing on this live session to be somewhat pedestrian and over repetitive.

    Of course about 10 years later I re-discovered Green and he is one of my favorites, but I'm still not a fan of this jam \ live session.

    My favorite Green album is that 2 disc set with Sonny Clark (due to the mix of Green blue based original tunes and standards).
    Repetitive maybe, but I wouldn't call anything on this record pedestrian. It was definitely a different era for Green, though.
    On the Turntable: Steve Reich - Phases (box set), Fred Frith Guitar Quartet - Ayaya Moses
    Guitar:
    Fender AVRI '59 w/ TI Swing 11s and Tyson Tone pickups
    Through: Polytone Mini Brute II

  22. #21

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    I am a huge GG fan; I have all his albums and most (well.. a lot at least) of his work as side man too.

    My favorite album might be a surprise: The Latin Bit! Why? Because it has that ‘feel good sound’ that makes me smile ;-) Corny tunes a plenty on that album, but you’ll find yourself whistling them long after listening. And it’s so darn groovy! Entertaining in every way!

    Believe it or not but I am seriously considering getting a group together to play all them tunes of that album....!


    Full album on youtube:

    Grant Green - The Latin Bit (full album) - YouTube
    Jazz, Funk, Soul & Boogaloo: My group | Listen to Hip Jazz a Go Go! | Jazz, Soul, Blues: Eva La Voix

  23. #22

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    All his Blue Note recordings are wonderful. Sunday Mornin.....another must have. I love his version of Exodus.

  24. #23

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    Grants First Stand. Solid. Green With Envy

    So tough, Grants First Stand. Just so swinging, the energy the blues. Miss Ann’s Tempo it is so alive I can just imagine experiencing that live and the crowd going nuts.

    Solid accompanied by Henderson and Tyner and Cranshaw and Elvin Jones. Are you serious? What a combination, what a privilidge to hear these all time greats together.

    Notwithstanding the above greatness the intimacy of the trio on Green With Envy that does it for me. It is a guitar album. It is almost rock n roll in parts, it’s sounds like a bunch of mates blowing. Each instrument is so clear in the mix, Tucker and Bailey blossom. GG’s sound is really warm. It is a really rhythmic album. Green With Envy is a show stopper.

    Actually I change my mind Solid is ridiculously good. It is jazz at its best.
    “When you’re creating your own ...., man, even the sky ain’t the limit.”
    Miles Davis

  25. #24

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    Iron city .that cover pic bothers me..Green didnt do any time... am i missing something

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by voxss View Post
    Iron city .that cover pic bothers me..Green didnt do any time... am i missing something
    Those are not bars but guitar strings.

  27. #26

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    true .but i find the pic unsettling ...despair ..dont feel that with Greens music...at moment collecting every transcription out there...

  28. #27

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    Bunch of good ones. Gonna go with "Idle Moments."
    Damn good line-up: Grant, Joe Henderson, Bobby Hutcherson, Duke Pearson, Bob Cranshaw, Al Harewood. Very nice writing and arranging too (guit, sax, vibes harmonies work very well).

  29. #28

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    I always come back to Greene Street. That tone is the icing on the cake.
    Edit: yeah I dictated that to my phone, and no I'm not going to fix the mistakes.

  30. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    Solid.

    Shows a bit of all Grant could do.
    Same here. That lineup, with that material is just magic. I feel like it shows in his playing a little different style

  31. #30

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    Nice lesser known grant. I think originally under Dave Bailey's name, but nonetheless beautiful playing from Grant. Plus Ben Tucker on bass.

  32. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by voxss View Post
    Iron city .that cover pic bothers me..Green didn't do any time... am i missing something
    According to his biography, written by Sharony Andrews Green, "Grant was sentenced to prison for drug possession in 1968. Initially, Grant received almost a slap on the wrist. Grant ended up with a longer sentence after he failed to report to the penitentiary at the agreed upon time."

    IMHO, the book is a good read for the dedicated Grant Green fan.

  33. #32

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    Jimmy D’Aquisto told me Grant would put anything he could get in his arm.

  34. #33

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    im shocked but not shocked ..prison was the norm for posession.....joe pass..dexter gordon..so the record cover was Green behind bars...thnks for info...Update..1968 Green received a brief prison sentence for drug possession. Rather than reporting to prison, he left for a gig in California. Federal agents waited until he finished his set before arresting him and escorting him to prison for a longer sentence.like WES he got tired of jazz...$$$.. had grown frustrated with his meager earnings. Blue Note could record cheaply but lacked the resources to promote their albums.1965 he was moving more toward pop music and funk. After his release from prison, Green returned to Blue Note to make more commercial recordings that received radio play. Between 1969 and 1973 Green's records not only scored high on the jazz charts, they hit the rhythm and blues and soul charts as well. Some critics accused him of selling out to commercialism....


  35. #34

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    I just gave Mobley’s “Workout” record another spin. Man that is a great one too, even though he’s not the leader. Every GG solo on the record is top notch

  36. #35

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    The earliest one that I have is Grantstand which was released in 1962. Yusuf Lateef on sax and Brother Jack McDuff on the organ. I like the earlier stuff, but I need to find more of of it. That said I’ll take what I can find. He was great no doubt. I have a later 1970 release Green is Beautiful which is pretty cool. It has the Beatles, A Day in the Life on it. Green is really articulate. I want to contrast it with Wes Montgomery’s take in 1967 which had to be months after the Beatles released the original. Unfortunately I can’t find my copy of that one. Those times were weird but interesting IMHO.

  37. #36

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    Even though these threads always end up being a list of albums, I still really enjoy them because there's always something new for me to check out. I've never heard "The Latin Bit", but, am now inspired to check it out!

    My favorite Grant record for overall mood and vibe is "Feelin' the spirit", but that has less to do with his playing and more to do with the overall outcome. Hearing Herbie play gospel is just incredible, and Billy Higgins!

    My single favorite Grant track of all time is "It Ain't Necessarily So".

    for sideman work, I've always been partial to Stanley Turrentine's "Up At Minton's", Grant plays some great stuff there.

  38. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by pcsanwald View Post

    ... My single favorite Grant track of all time is "It Ain't Necessarily So".
    That is a great tune ... ! It is so crisp and punchy I was surprised when I discovered it was a Gershwin tune from Porgy and Bess.

    Another tune that I think really emphasizes his unique single-note melody style is, "You Don't Know What Love Is" on Talkin' About. In fact, this album is one that Dave Stryker mentioned in his master's class a must-have. The B3 comp is just cool, too.

  39. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paulie2 View Post
    I just gave Mobley’s “Workout” record another spin. Man that is a great one too, even though he’s not the leader. Every GG solo on the record is top notch
    Mobley's Workout with Grant is the non-Green-lead album I tend to fall back on the most.

    Others have mentioned The Latin Bit; While I didn't list this as my favorite it might be the one I listen to the most since it is the one my wife really likes. While she loves jazz, The Latin Bit tunes have very pleasing, non-complex melodies and not being a jazz nut like me, she favors Latin rhythms.

  40. #39

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    "Idle moments", the music track in which I would live. Melancholic and melodic (Melocholic ? Melanlodic ?) at the highest point. And the first jazz intro I learned...
    Ps: If it were even possible to live in this track I would have my summer holidays in a more boogaloo record.