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  1. #1

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    phew


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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Great technique but this reminds me of what I use to listen to 30 years ago when I first got into jazz guitar.

    E.g. version of Cherokee by Tal, Jimmy, etc.... I.e. the faster the better. Today I don't even listen to those recordings.

    Hey, I still like up tempo music but mainly I listen to, and play at medium tempos; I just found this to be more musical .

  4. #3

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    Not impressed. He's raping the tune and the situation.

  5. #4

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    This reminds me of a local Flamenco guitarist I can't stand who guys by "Blondie".

  6. #5

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    He is actually a Greek bouzouki player in the states, he plays guitar on the side.

  7. #6

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    I got the impression he doesn't want to play with another guitar player, or he's trying to bully him with the technique, or he just don't care about communication. Either way, it didn't work IMO. But great technique yea, could've done better with it though.

  8. #7

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    Playing music is an art, not an athletic event.

  9. #8

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    Sorry, this won't lead me to give up playing. 30 sec and I was fed up.
    Even if I'm far from being able to "play" that fast
    I just intend to play some music, with my heart, and it's hard enough for me !
    Make a jazz noise here

  10. #9

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    Damn fast. That's about it, really. Nothing interesting melodically or harmonically.

    Are they playing the same song?
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  11. #10

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    I think fast, virtuosic playing can be very exciting and inspiring.

    This clip in particular didn't do anything for me, didn't really have anything interesting or inspiring going on musically.
    Oh, hi - if interested, I post a lot of playing/practice clips at www.instagram.com/JakeEstner

  12. #11

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    Makes me want to quit playing for the opposite reason implied by the OP.

  13. #12

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    So this means this must be the best shakespeare. NOW I get it!


  14. #13

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    His technique allows him to get into a mood which sometimes reminds me of the term "sheets of sound". The notes take on a different meaning if played at that speed. Sometimes i can almost perceive it as floating. With a suitably strong rhythm section it might actually work out. In this context it doesn't.
    _________
    JazzNote

  15. #14

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    I don't think he's that fast actually. Fast is Al Di Meola, or in the rock world the players like Paul Gilbert or Buckethead, having flawless picking and absolute control over what are they doing over the harmony and rhythm. Whereas this guy is turning on the autopilot and hoping he'll have the time to land on a more or less correct note. Not to mention that his playing is stiff and harsh, no dynamics, which is result of him trying to be the fastest guy in the world.

    EDIT: Or listen to Paco De Lucia, for a more "acoustic" comparison. Not to mention classic players who play some etudes so fast, I mean, I can't even hear the melody in my mind that fast.

  16. #15

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    i hung in there for 43 seconds. he can move his hands fast but i prefer guitar players who play music

  17. #16

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    I did give up ... listening (also after 43 seconds).

  18. #17

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    The big problem with you guys .... you all have good taste!!!

  19. #18

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    he should get some distortion on that bitch
    White belt
    My Youtube

  20. #19

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    You guys are too harsh. I can hear the bouzouki in this. Try shredding a bouzouki, record it, then post your recording.

    Waiting...

    Having said that, it's an interesting technique, just not my taste. I will listen to Paco or the Gipsy Kings if I want some fast acoustic stuff, or McLaughlin in his post-electric phase.

  21. #20

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    OP, you're absolutely right. After listening, I've given up guitar.

    David

  22. #21

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    I’m not a Yngwie fan, but I’d rather listen to Yngwie.
    Ignorance is agony.



  23. #22

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    Put me in the "I didn't want to stop playing, I decided to stop listening" camp.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  24. #23

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    Mmh, after listening to this I want to stop trying to play fast :-)

    ... honestly, that was a really unpleasant listening experience that I also quickly stopped. Give me Gilmour any day who plays 10 notes or so a minute ... but they move me ... this just makes me want to run away.

  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff View Post
    You guys are too harsh. I can hear the bouzouki in this. Try shredding a bouzouki, record it, then post your recording.

    Waiting...

    Having said that, it's an interesting technique, just not my taste. I will listen to Paco or the Gipsy Kings if I want some fast acoustic stuff, or McLaughlin in his post-electric phase.
    He should stick to bouzouki then.

    I mean, I could play a guitar like a drum, but it aint.
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by jameslovestal View Post
    Great technique but this reminds me of what I use to listen to 30 years ago when I first got into jazz guitar.

    E.g. version of Cherokee by Tal, Jimmy, etc.... I.e. the faster the better. Today I don't even listen to those recordings.

    Hey, I still like up tempo music but mainly I listen to, and play at medium tempos; I just found this to be more musical .
    You found this to be more musical than Tal Farlow and Jimmy Raney playing up tempo tunes?
    Add another name to the ignore list...

  27. #26

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    ...every note has an origin and a destination...
    - Tal Farlow

  28. #27

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    This kind of fast picking is idiomatic to the bouzouki instrument, where players often play melodies picking notes as fast as possible (kinda like death metal style ).
    Here are some better videos with the Rosenberg trio and Al di meola, and with his music







  29. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgcim View Post
    You found this to be more musical than Tal Farlow and Jimmy Raney playing up tempo tunes?
    Add another name to the ignore list...
    The 'this' (that I found more musical) was medium tempo over up tempo recordings (by all the players I like, e.g. Tal, Jimmy etc...).

    I didn't find this performance to be very musical (and not just because he played fast but because he wasn't playing with the other guitar player).

    I only mentioned Tal and Jimmy's version of Cherokee as examples of when I was young and was fooled by the faster-the-better and that today I like their more lyrical recordings (as well as more lyrical \ in-the-pocket guitar playing).

    I.e. 30 years ago I might have been impressed by this performance but not today.
    Last edited by jameslovestal; 05-19-2018 at 03:27 PM.

  30. #29

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    The was some of the least musical speed playing I've ever heard. I didn't even make it to :43.

  31. #30

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    Alter, I loved those Bouzouki pieces you posted above. He is a singular talent for sure.

    I also liked his playing with Di Meola. I recall seeing that piece played live in the early 80's, but for the life of me I can't remember if it was with the Guitar Trio, Di Meola solo or McLaughlin solo--probably the latter, because I remember that one very well. I was sitting about 10 feet from McLaughlin and the lovely Katia Lebeque. I might have also seen De Lucia playing solo. My memory is a little hazy of that time (for many reasons). I probably went to 40-50 shows that year--not exaggerating--and might have forgotten about a few. (I used to keep the ticket stubs in a little box...probably somewhere in a bigger box in the basement.)

    The OP's original video was maybe a joke or one-off or something--shouldn't have been posted, because it's not on par with his bouzouki stuff, and allows guitarists to take potshots at him. His bouzouki playing though is fast, lyrical and musical, IMHO.
    Last edited by Doctor Jeff; 05-20-2018 at 08:23 AM.

  32. #31

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    His bouzouki playing though is fast, lyrical and musical, IMHO.
    I'd agree with fast.

  33. #32

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    Most bouzouki players tend to fall in two categories, the technical one and the lyrical/traditional one. Not unlike gypsy guitar or flamenco players. I think he 's one of the better ones in the first style. It is interesting how similar the bouzouki picking technique is to the gypsy picking one.

    For me the biggest enigma with this instrument has been .. how to hold it in one place, with the round back. Can't do it for the life of me..

  34. #33

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    This is one of my favorite "sleeper" records ... Phil woods combining jazz with Greek Music. The Bouzouki player, Iordanis Tsomidis,
    is more in the lyrical mold.


  35. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff View Post
    Alter, I loved those Bouzouki pieces you posted above. He is a singular talent for sure.

    I also liked his playing with Di Meola. I recall seeing that piece played live in the early 80's, but for the life of me I can't remember if it was with the Guitar Trio, Di Meola solo or McLaughlin solo--probably the latter, because I remember that one very well. I was sitting about 10 feet from McLaughlin and the lovely Katia Lebeque. I might have also seen De Lucia playing solo. My memory is a little hazy of that time (for many reasons). I probably went to 40-50 shows that year--not exaggerating--and might have forgotten about a few. (I used to keep the ticket stubs in a little box...probably somewhere in a bigger box in the basement.)

    The OP's original video was maybe a joke or one-off or something--shouldn't have been posted, because it's not on par with his bouzouki stuff, and allows guitarists to take potshots at him. His bouzouki playing though is fast, lyrical and musical, IMHO.
    The tune is "Mediterranean Sundance/Rio Ancho." It starts with Di Meola's "Mediterranean Sundance" and goes into Paco De Lucia's "Rio Ancho".

  36. #35

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    That is ear shattering and I could not stand the sound at all. I would take up playing to show folks that the guitar sounds wonderful and rich, just do not think this what a good guitar should sound like.
    specializing in repair and setup, does your guitar play like it should?

  37. #36

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    Love me the odd burst of speed, it can add excitement or exuberance. Bird, Cannon, Trane, Clifford, Shorter, Becker etc, but also our Wes or GB...

    However, like most here, I deeply detest continuous diatonic simple scale running, including the De Lucia / Dimeola / phrygian / Flamenco type grandstanding (with all due respect to it's tradition). It's all so cheap sounding isn't it? To our Jazz ears at least.

    And I struggle to imagine who could possibly be entertained by this style of playing- all I can come up with is 14 year old male guitar students who always seem to be impressed by anyone who can play scales faster than they can... or something?....

  38. #37

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    Hey, Durban !
    Where are you ?
    Please come back with us and just tell us : that was a joke, wasn't it ?
    Make a jazz noise here

  39. #38

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    Sounds like the musical equivalent of an MG-42.

    He's very, very good, there's no denying that.

    As far as giving up after hearing him or any other good player? Nah. All that does is make me want to practice more and become a better player than I am.

  40. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by princeplanet View Post
    Love me the odd burst of speed, it can add excitement or exuberance. Bird, Cannon, Trane, Clifford, Shorter, Becker etc, but also our Wes or GB...

    However, like most here, I deeply detest continuous diatonic simple scale running, including the De Lucia / Dimeola / phrygian / Flamenco type grandstanding (with all due respect to it's tradition). It's all so cheap sounding isn't it? To our Jazz ears at least.

    And I struggle to imagine who could possibly be entertained by this style of playing- all I can come up with is 14 year old male guitar students who always seem to be impressed by anyone who can play scales faster than they can... or something?....
    Which is why I mentioned that when I first got into jazz guitar I liked this 'the faster the better' playing, but that was 30 years ago when I was 20!

    I would purchase jazz guitar albums and make cassettes tapes (yea, it really as that long ago!), and I would only record the 2 fastest songs or songs with the fastest scale running riffs from each album. This went on for a few years until I started taking lessons and discovered that MUSIC is so much more than just being able to play fast, repetitive riffs. After my ears 'matured' I even was able to fall in love with the playing of Jim Hall.

  41. #40

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    Now, if you want to hear burnin' with a recognizable melody ...


  42. #41

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    I had this on VHS until it just wore out. Don't know how many times I watched/listened to it. Never get tired of players like Herb and Barney.

  43. #42

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    Speed can be technically impressive but dosn't carry my interest beyond the first 30-40 seconds in 95% of cases.
    When the speed is allied to musical messages, melody and harmonic/rythmic creativity then my attention can be retained for maybe 5 minutes - but I still often say to myself "when will he use silence and spaces.... this needs some punctuation". I have the same response whether it is in the field of jazz (Birelli Legrène rapidly bores me, Al di Meola in his earlier years kept my attention longer), rock (sorry, shredding ain't for me but Steve Howe, Alan Holdsworth and Terry Kath grab and retain my attention) or traditional folk (9/8 irish slipjigs played at 190 bore me unless the fiddler is Aly Bain or Dave Swarbrick who understand/understood space)

  44. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ray175 View Post
    When the speed is allied to musical messages, melody and harmonic/rythmic creativity then my attention can be retained for maybe 5 minutes - but I still often say to myself "when will he use silence and spaces.... this needs some punctuation". I have the same response whether it is in the field of jazz (Birelli Legrène rapidly bores me,
    While I agree with you I don't view Legrene as a 'just fast' guitar player. I find him to be very melodic and lyrical. E.g. His Blue Eyes album and especially the song I Got You Under My Skin.

    Now his gypsy jazz stuff does often start to sound the same but I view that as the nature of that style of music and not because of any limitations on the part of Legrene.

  45. #44

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    That dude needs "The Glove", then he could go even faster...Imagine!!

    I was reminded of a later on AXS Fleetwood Mac concert where L. Buckingham loses his mind and
    is just beating on his guitar, nothing musical came out of it, just teen angst in a 60 something
    that was not endearing... No wonder they s***canned him...
    measure with micrometer... mark with chalk... cut with axe

  46. #45

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    Thought it sounded like a bouzouki played by an angry bee. I listened 1:45 into it. More of the same so I quit.

    I could never play like that if I tried. But thankfully, I have no wish to play like that.

    I hope he doesn't, uh, fook with the same angry intensity. Sorry, mates...

  47. #46

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    I hope I never play like that guy. What a train wreck.

  48. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff View Post
    Alter, I loved those Bouzouki pieces you posted above. He is a singular talent for sure.


    The OP's original video was maybe a joke or one-off or something--shouldn't have been posted, because it's not on par with his bouzouki stuff, and allows guitarists to take potshots at him. His bouzouki playing though is fast, lyrical and musical, IMHO.
    I believe you might be misunderstanding who (or where) any 'potshots' are directed: I see that most are directed at the OP as related to the title of the thread: "you will give up playing after this".

    That the OP would be so impressed by this video to create a title that was so over-the-top. Of course the title wasn't meant literally but instead was saying "you will be really impressed by this", when the vast majority of us were NOT impressed (far from it).

    So yea, posting this video did a disservice to the talents of the guitarist, as well as showing that the OP had a total misunderstanding of what most guitar players here would find impressive.

  49. #48

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    I started to bail @00:26 but tried a little longer... but too much was the glaring mistake @00:41 (rouge C#; they are in D minor, so the harmonic minor would invoke C#, but that's not where it came from...)
    "Bent my ear to hear the tune and closed my eyes to see."

  50. #49

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    woh is so fassttt!

  51. #50

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    And the only logical ending to speed for speed's sake is ....