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  1. #1

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    I started listening to Pat Martino more lately. I just finished hearing the Road Song. This was a take on a Wes classic. But Pat went further without seeming, well, unseemly. He added quite a bit of complex chording in the background that was both amazing and tasteful.

    He's someone who can do long runs of 16th notes and make each one count.

    I focused on his tone and really like the sound of each note. I wondered how these notes could be so fat coming from his skinny guitars. Then I remember he uses ropes for strings.

    I have some heavy Labellas, and they're no too bad. Has anyone tried the GHS Martino strings?



    GHS Custom Shop: Pat Martino Flatwounds

    GHS Stainless Steel Precision Flats™ deliver a traditional deep percussive tone due to the unique cross-winding process. They are made with a highly magnetic stainless steel flat wrap for greater volume, longer durability and a smooth satin finish. These are specific gauges put together specifically for guitar legend, Pat Martino.
    GAUGE GUIDE
    MODEL# 1st-E 2nd-B 3rd-G 4th-D 5th-A 6th-E
    CU-MARTINO-L .015 .017 F24 F32 F42 F52
    CU-MARTINO-M .016 .018 F24 F36 F46 F56
    MG

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    I thought he described his strings as set of 12's that he replaces the high E and B with heavier strings the rest are normal. The normal strings move around too much when he picks.
    No, I'm not going to give you the answer to your question. I don't want to deny you the pleasure you'll receive when you figure it out yourself. -- Bill Evans talking to his brother.

  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by docbop View Post
    I thought he described his strings as set of 12's that he replaces the high E and B with heavier strings the rest are normal. The normal strings move around too much when he picks.

    That looks like it's true with the "light" set. The mediums are pretty heavy.

    Here are Labella's heaviest flats. They are similar to the Martino mediums.


    Pat Martino -- question about his strings-la-bella-electric-guitar-stainless-steel-flat-wound-015-056-20ph-png
    MG

  5. #4

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    I ordered a couple of sets. They are not easy to find, which reflects their popularity or lack thereof. I ordered them from Strings By Mail. They're only about $12 a set.
    MG

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marty Grass View Post
    I ordered a couple of sets. They are not easy to find, which reflects their popularity or lack thereof. I ordered them from Strings By Mail. They're only about $12 a set.
    Please report back, MG? I've looked at these strings, too, but I'm still in the land of the nickel-wrapped.

  7. #6

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    I'll report back.

    GHS is only a few miles from my home, yet I have a love-hate relationship with their strings. One good thing they got going for them is that they are not expensive.
    MG

  8. #7

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    Other factors in PMs tone on that LP and I'm assuming we are talking about the Road Song from the LP "The Visit" , was his use of a very heavy pick, strong/hard attack and his oval holed Koontz archtop. In the late 70's I tried the heavy top strings e.g. .15s etc and since I wasn't PM and didn't hit the strings that hard,and played with a 25.5 sale, it was just plain hard to play.

  9. #8

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    There's a music store in the Philly suburbs near where my office was, the proprietor told me Pat comes in there- and he uses a 17 E string.

  10. #9
    When I was studying with Pat a bit in the late 80's, he was using GHS 15, 18, 26, 36, 46, 56 on that intricately carved Rivera "Les Paul". He was not a 'try my guitar' kind of guy, so no idea how a setup like that really felt.

    PK

  11. #10
    I studied with him in the late '70s and he used .016 .018 .028 .038 .048 .058

  12. #11
    He also used extremely high action. he once demonstrated that he could barely play an F barre chord in 1st position with the string height and guage.

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by paulkogut View Post
    When I was studying with Pat a bit in the late 80's, he was using GHS 15, 18, 26, 36, 46, 56 on that intricately carved Rivera "Les Paul". He was not a 'try my guitar' kind of guy, so no idea how a setup like that really felt.

    PK
    Did he explain why he used those strings?
    MG

  14. #13
    He liked pick hard with a heavy plectrum (I don't recall exactly what..) and would break a lighter string. He did cop to the fact that it was a tradeoff, he was giving up any legato phrasing possibilities rather than lighten up on his picking attack. He used to call his right hand "The Dropout" and his left hand "The PhD"...

    PK

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by M-ster View Post
    Please report back, MG? I've looked at these strings, too, but I'm still in the land of the nickel-wrapped.
    I've used nickel rounds for years, mainly to combat fret wear. On my one guitar with flats they are 13 chrome. Since flats are not like tiny files grinding away at feet material I feel assured that non-nickle flats shouldn't present a problem.

    And... while PM uses 15 gauge, which I think is pretty hefty. As much as I like the idea, I really wouldn't want to cut another nut just to try them out. Wound G strings are really nice though.

  16. #15

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    Be aware that La Bella strings are made specifically for guitars with an archtop/violin style tailpiece. If you put them on a guitar with a stoptail or string through/ top loader the windings at the ball end may likely extend over the bridge. In short, they don’t fit Les Paul ‘s or telecasters. I was ready to buy some and saw the warning on one of the online string dealers.
    Ignorance is agony.