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  1. #1

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    I'm talking about listening rather than teachers...

    It's REALLY hard choice.... These aren't always the players I think are the best, funnily enough. For example I feel that Johnny Hodges is perhaps the greatest alto sax player of all time, even above Bird, but I'm not that influenced by him.

    1) Miles
    2) Lester Young
    3) Bird
    4) Coltrane (probably the first jazz musician I really got into - the whole quartet, really important, Elvin, McCoy)
    5) Duke Ellington

    Mostly horn players as you can see... But I do also love drummers.... This list is mostly 'historical' but Mark Giuliana would figure among my favourite modern non-guitar musicians.

    Is it just me or is the guitar much more prominent in contemporary jazz, or is that just the filter I am listening to it though?

    Singers... It's funny, but I do tend to learn my tunes from Ella or Nat Cole... Not Sinatra so much...

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  3. #2

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    1. Barry Harris
    2. Barry Harris
    3. Barry Harris
    4. Barry Harris
    5. Barry Harris

    (Ah, just saw the reference to listening, rather than teaching.)

    1. Barry Harris
    2. Bud Powell
    3. Steve Swallow
    4. Tom Harrell
    5. Tony Bennett
    Last edited by David B; 03-02-2017 at 06:51 PM.

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  4. #3

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    Wow, what an interesting question. It is somewhat discomfitting as it makes me realize I almost only listen to guitar players. I don't enjoy listening to most sax players except Paul Desmond (the sax cliches are really annoying to me, they tend to overplay, and the sound of the instrument is often unattractive). I like trumpet, particularly Art Farmer and Miles; I would rate those two as influences. And I love how Herbie Hancock comps and have tried to bring some of that into my comping.

    Come to think of it, I prefer to comp than to solo which might also be why I don't attend much to horn players and singers in terms of finding things I can play on guitar. Comping is a much more interesting and challenging process, to me.
    Beauty is as close to terror as we can well endure. -Rainer Maria Rilke

  5. #4

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    Wow, hard to pick 5...here's probably "all time," but maybe not "this week"

    1. Paul Desmond
    2. Bill Evans
    3. Hank Mobley
    4. Chet Baker
    5. Ahmad Jamal
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  6. #5
    Not very diverse...

    Keith Jarrett
    Jack dejohnette
    Gary peacock
    Ahmad Jamal
    Ella Fitzgerald

  7. #6

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    louis armstrong -influenced everything that came after
    charlie parker-fluidity and invention
    don cherry- eclecticism
    jimmy giuffre-perfection
    stan getz-the sound


    cheers

  8. #7

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    1. wayne shorter
    2. miles davis
    3. monk
    4. bill evans
    5. keith jarrett

  9. #8

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    Stan Getz
    Paul Desmond
    Erroll Garner
    Joe Venuti
    Buddy Defranco

    Tomorrow, the list could look entirely different.

  10. #9

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    John Lewis - made jazz extremely approachable to me.
    Stan Getz - style, phrasing, tone and ideas and just about everything
    Thelonious Monk - Dissonance coupled with sheer fun
    Oscar Peterson - Fluidity and embellishment
    Ella Fitzgerald - 'nuff said.

  11. #10

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    in no order maybe...

    Lee Morgan
    Hank Mobley
    Art Pepper
    Dexter Gordon
    Bird

  12. #11

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    No big surprises I am sure, but I can't limit it to 5:

    Miles Davis
    Ornette Coleman
    Chet Baker
    John Coltrane
    Art Pepper
    Paul Desmond
    Art Blakey
    Charles Mingus
    Gerry Mulligan
    Thelonius Monk
    Bill Evans
    Kenny Drew
    Jan Hammer
    Billy Cobham
    Last edited by lammie200; 03-02-2017 at 08:47 PM.

  13. #12

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    John Coltrane
    Mingus
    Chick Corea
    Jarrett
    Freddie Hubbard
    Sonny Rollins
    Clifford Brown

  14. #13

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    Bud Powell
    Herbie Hancock
    Monk
    Red Garland
    Bill Evans

  15. #14

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    Clifford Brown
    Charlie Parker
    John Coltrane
    Chick Corea
    Jaco Pastorius

    The first three I've transcribed the most, though I'm afraid they haven't (yet) influenced my playing as much as I'd like. The last two are the guys that really got me into jazz.

  16. #15

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    1. Or
    2. Nette
    3. Cole
    4. Man
    5. John Zorn

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Duotone View Post
    1. Or
    2. Nette
    3. Cole
    4. Man
    5. John Zorn
    Ornette Coleman Hawkins? :-)

  18. #17

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    Miles Davis, Dexter Gordon, Sonny Rollins, Pharaoh Saunders, Stan Getz
    Last edited by citizenk74; 06-14-2019 at 09:46 AM. Reason: Spelling
    Best regards, k

  19. #18

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    Lee Morgan
    Clifford Brown
    Donald Bird
    Lou Donaldson
    Jack MacDuff
    Jimmy Forrest


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    “When you’re creating your own ...., man, even the sky ain’t the limit.”
    Miles Davis

  20. #19

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    Only one really. Everything else came after the fact. Louis Armstrong. He's the reason I play music. I heard him when I was 11 and felt like I had been waiting my whole life to hear him. It's been a journey. So just limited to 5, in some approximation of time.

    Duke Ellington
    Miles
    Parker
    Mingus (a passing passion)
    Hank Mobley
    Desmond
    Pepper

    ok, so I lied And Clifford, definitely, Clifford.
    Last edited by deselby; 03-02-2017 at 08:16 PM.

  21. #20

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    Art Pepper
    Louis Jordan
    Jaco
    Illinois Jacquet
    Jack McDuff

  22. #21

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    Charlie Parker
    John Coltrane
    McCoy Tyner
    Dexter Gordon
    Cannonball Adderely

  23. #22

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    Dexter Gordon
    Chet Baker
    Miles Davis
    Charlie Parker

    Coltrane was the first one I really got into, but I'm not sure about influence simply because I can't play anything like he did, on the guitar. But I did listen obsessively.

  24. #23

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    Bill Evans
    Miles Davis
    Sonny Stitt
    Wayne Shorter
    Art Blakey

  25. #24

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    These guys shaped the way I hear jazz, it's as much about the composing as anything. They created the jazz repertoire I like to play.

    miles
    monk
    mingus
    shorter
    trane
    ...can't really leave out herbie

  26. #25

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    Picking 5..hard to do. But these have been pretty much constants

    Ornette Coleman
    Steve Lacy
    Anthony Braxton
    Thelonious Monk
    Charles Mingus


    ..and everyone who influenced them..like Parker, Lester Young, Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, etc. I have always tried to learn about where my heros are coming from and then listen to them, and their own, to hear the relationship to what they themselves have done.

  27. #26

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    Hank Mobley
    Fred Hersch
    Herbie Nichols
    Cecil Taylor
    David Binney

    There are so many, but these are the ones I'm constantly turning to with that "What WAS that?" question.

    David

  28. #27

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    John Zorn
    Jaco
    Coltrane
    Miles
    Mingus

    No surprises here.

  29. #28

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    Miles Davis
    John Coltrane
    Fred Simon
    Joe Zawinul
    Lyle Mays

  30. #29

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    Cannonball
    Clifford B.
    Bags
    Sonny Rollins
    Oscar P.
    _____________________________________________
    "When the chord changes, you should change" Joe Pass

  31. #30

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    Non-guitarist musicians commonly recognized as jazz players:

    Paul Desmond stand alone on the list. Maybe because, as a young player, I didn't have many albums, but I had two of his.

    An aside: I don't think he was an influence, but I also had a Johnny Hodges album (Con-soul and sax, I think was the title) which I listened to more than I listened to Charlie Parker with Strings, which I had too.

    Other than Desmond, my influences tended to be guitarists -- and rock and blues players maybe more than jazz players. That's off topic here.

    I have also been influenced, more recently, by players I've had the opportunity to hear and play with. I've listened very carefully to Robert Kyle (tenor). I love his playing and I have tried to incorporate his incredible feel into what I do -- although I think with very limited success.

    Chromatic harmonica great Damien Masterson is another. Unique feel.

    I remember loving Gerald Wilson big band arrangements. I heard them on Mort Fega's radio show on FM in NYC in the mid 60's. Really atmospheric. I don't know if that crept into my playing, though.

    Oh, almost forgot. Ralph Sharon. He was Tony Bennett's pianist for a long time. What I love about his music is the way he comped in countermelody. So, for example, a turnaround would never be just some block chords. He was so melodic a turnaround would be a little song of its own. I think that did get into my playing, but it has to be the right situation -- swing music, vocals and no piano.

  32. #31

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    Lester Young (above all)

    After him in random order:

    Bud Powell
    Basie
    The Duke
    Dexter Gordon

    When using the word "influenced", I think as much about attitude to making music (and playing with other musicians) as about individual stylistic traits.

    Lester Young stayed true to his way of playing despite any opposition he met, and it was a lot. I love his smooth and laid back style which nevertheless swung hard in it's very own way. He really mastered staying in the groove - his own groove. He's one of the few musicians I can listen to all day long.

    Bud Powell managed to become creator of a style of piano playing which set the agenda for decades despite his serious mental illness and later in his life the motor side effects of the neuroleptics he had to take.

    Basie may not have been the worlds greatest virtuoso (though he could play far more than we hear on the Basie Band records) but he understood his place and role in the band better than most - and used that understanding to perfection. He and his rhtym section should still be a role model these days.

    The Duke had this immense talent for writing new and unusual (for the time) music. He also had the strong personality to make his band, partly populated by individualists and primadonnas, play it for decades exactly as he wanted it to sound. He was once nominated for a big music price but was eventually bypassed in favor of a much lesser musician. When asked about how he felt about it, he answered: "I think The Good Lord don't want me become famous too soon." He was in his 60s by then.

    Dexter Gordon was such a strong voice, had a great logic in his phrasing. And when he arrived in Denmark in the 1960s, he set out to discipline the Danish musicians, especially rhythm sections which were fairly sloppy at that time. For him music was not fooling around, it should be taken seriously.

    And if I may bring a most underrated musician (there are many) to attention, check out pianist Jimmy Jones who played with Stuff Smith in the swing era but later became Sarah Vaughans accompagnist for many years. He had impeccable taste and the most delicate touch. Kenny Burrell rated him very highly. After Billy Strayhorn died, he now and then subbed for The Duke in the Ellington band when The Duke couldn't make it. Check out his ballad playing here (with Sarah Vaughan, 1954):

    Last edited by oldane; 03-05-2017 at 05:04 AM.
    "But if they all play like me, then who am I?" (Lester Young)

  33. #32

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    Coleman Hawkins
    Lester Young
    Charlie Parker
    Paul Chambers
    Sam Jones

  34. #33

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    1. Keith Emerson
    2. Trane/Miles
    3. McCoy Tyner
    4. Stan Getz
    5. Buddy Rich

  35. #34

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    John Coltrane
    Art Tatum
    Stan Getz
    Oscar Peterson
    Buddy Rich

  36. #35

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    miles..from Kind of Blue on

    bill evans

    jimmy smith

    chick corea/herbie hancock/laffeyette gilchrist

    Charles mingus

    grover Washington jr
    play well ...
    wolf

  37. #36

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    ornette coleman
    steve lacy
    thelonious monk
    gyorgy ligeti
    ben goldberg

  38. #37

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    Gary Burton

    Jan Garbarek

    Eberhard Weber

    Björn J:son Lindh

    Lyle Mays

  39. #38
    Bird
    Coltrane
    Sonny Rollins
    Lester Young
    Ambrose Akinmusire (More of an inspiration than a direct influence on my playing)

  40. #39

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    Benny Goodman

    Count Basie

    Dizzy Gillespie

    Charlie Parker

    George Shearing

  41. #40

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    Wow, I can't believe I missed this thread--awesome question.

    I, too, got into Jazz by listening to John Coltrane--through my father. I melted The John Coltrane "Quartet" cassette album--the blue one with his portrait playing the horn--in my dad's tape player because we played it so much in the car. I can still hear "After the Rain" and "Tunji" in my head.

    I gotta give a shout out to Henry. Out of everyone who I've heard who lists Coltrane as an influence, you can REALLY hear 'trane in Henry's playing!

    My non-guitarist influences:

    1. Miles Davis--Mr. SPACE man

    2. Art Farmer--he did what Miles did, but his lines have a quality that is even more haunting. He knows how to land on those beautifully mysterious notes, especially on ballads--dang!

    3. LTD--Mr. Dexter Gordon--Soooooiiiy Caleeeeeaaaaffahhh--I know that his lines aren't super complex, but they are incredibly lyrical.

    4. Ben Webster--I can't play Bye Bye Blackbird or The Touch of Your Lips without hearing The Brute's (what a nickname) breathy phrasing.

    5. Cannonball Adderly--It's simultaneously a shout and a chant, depending on whether you know anything about the roots of church music. Meaning Soul Church Music, I don't mean Bach Choralllls!--the way he talked to his audience and brought them into his world. That, and Cannonball had this incredible sense of swing. Other's have said it, so I'll say it some more. He never played double time completely straight (like everyone says you're supposed to straight out the feel when you play fast)--nah, he had a sway when he played quarter notes, eighths, and sixteenths--that's how I've been practicing my double time. Vincent Herring is the closest we have to Cannonball.

    6. Oliver Nelson--he can solo in such a compositional manner it's ridiculous. That's because he was a composer as well. I still love his solo on Stolen Moments and his Sound Pieces Album--holy crap is that an exciting album! His early stuff is interesting because you can hear what he was reaching for, even at a young age.

    Do I have room for some more?

    I can't believe someone mentioned Ligeti--that's pretty bad ass!

    7. Beethoven

    8. Mozart

    9. Glen Gould--though, hopefully not his posture

  42. #41

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    Miles
    Dexter Gordon
    Sonny Rollins
    Dr. John
    The Blue Note crowd

    Iiro Rantala‘s John Lennon record has opened up new perspectives for me recently.


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  43. #42

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    Louis Armstrong
    Miles Davis
    Charles Mingus
    Frank Sinatra
    Ella Fitzgerald
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  44. #43

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    Come to think of it, I learned a lot from the Manhattan Transfer Vocalese album.


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  45. #44

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    Dave Brubeck & Paul Desmond, Benny Goodman, Louis Armstrong, Dizzy Gillespie, Buddy Rich.

  46. #45

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    My first two choices were family members. If not for them who knows if I would have my passion for music. But because of them, I had no choice but to be exposed to all musical styles, and every day I'm grateful for that. I could never figure out why other 8 year old's didn't dig Ragtime!

    #1 My late Aunt, Lally Sargent, she played, performed, and taught all styles of Jazz & Church music on a B3 organ for 80 of her 94 years. She even drove around in a Corvette convertible for 20 years and had the funkiest wardrobe I've ever seen.

    #2 My Grandmother and sister of my aunt above. She was a Classically trained pianist who mostly taught privately for 60 years. She was my first music teacher. They also had a sister Bernadette who was a singer.

    #3 Monk

    #4 Chet Baker

    #5 Bill Evans

    If it moves me I don't care what instrument it is. Or what style. My Father composed symphonic pieces with his Kurtzwell keyboards that really influenced my playing.

  47. #46

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    Donald Fagen - Harmonic Expansion
    Stevie Wonder- Harmonic &Rhythmic Expansion
    Michael Brecker- rhythms and the reckless speed with Soul ( soulful long notes mixed in )

    McCoy Tyner -slight influence , the others you can actually hear. Lol.

    I first became aware of Brecker doing that Church Blues on the Saturday Night Theme at the end .

    I heard this Tune when very young but always loved Soul Music/R&B..

    This was a hit on the Radio when I was very young: so I could add him as an influence now:



    That is some great Soul Music by Cannonball Adderly ...
    Live Recording with near perfect intonation making the Horns sound like a larger Section ( to me ).
    Last edited by Robertkoa; 06-20-2019 at 09:44 AM.

  48. #47

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    I wish these players would influence my playing: (in no order...)

    1. Jackie McLean
    2. Sonny Rollins
    3. Cannonball
    4. Trane
    5. Dexter

  49. #48

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    Eddie Costa
    Phil Woods
    Bill Evans
    Gene Puerling
    Tony Scott/Jimmy Giuffre

  50. #49

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    Vince Guaraldi- My first jazz experience was watching Charlie Brown. I love that swing he has in even his milder pieces. While “Linus & Lucy” is his most recognizable, the instrumental version of “Christmas Time is Here” just gets me every time.

    Louis Armstrong- my other first jazz influence. Even his covers (Mack the Knife, Dream a little Dream of Me, La Vie En Rose) got me further into the genre. I am not as much into the modal stuff as the big band/trad and soulful styles (a la Billie Holiday).

    Tony Bennett- just pure class. Nothing more will really add to that.

    Gershwin- my other earliest jazz influence was also very orchestra oriented

    Count Basie- I love the blues/jazz crossovers

    Honorable Mentions:
    Bennie Goodman- Probably the best rhythm section in trad jazz I could think of.

    I want to add whomever wrote Manha de Carnival, because it’s my favorite jazz guitar piece, performed by Al DiMeola, John McLaughlin, and Paco deLucia. I could listen to it on repeat for hours.
    Last edited by zcostilla; 06-20-2019 at 12:21 AM.
    Redeemed, Husband, Father, Veteran. Thankful for all four!

    I play a customized Godin 5th Avenue, Córdoba GK Studio, Gibson L6-S and a Hamer Korina. I also play a Kala uBass on occasion

  51. #50

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    "
    Gene Puerling"

    I have to admit I had to google that name, but now I see he was in the Hi Lo's etc..