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  1. #51

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    Tribal Tech needs more love in this thread. While it may be hard to single out just one album, I think their body of work stand among the best.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

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    Certain Prog bands crossed into Fusion; Bruford and UK and Soft Machine have been mentioned. If you like those, check out Hatfield & The North (especially The Rotters Club album), Gilgamesh (Another Fine Tune You’ve Gotten Me Into) and Soft Head (Rogue Element; no guitar on this last, but an absolutely bonkers electric piano, soprano sax, electric bass, drums lineup. Like Ask The Ages? Dig this).

  4. #53

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  5. #54

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    Also, and demonstrating the suitability of a Les Paul in a Jazz context via Phil Lea and his LP Deluxe:


  6. #55

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    welcome aboard L50....

    nice... super huge fan of early prog/ uk fusion..so many great players and recordings...nucleus, gong, softs (from which pour forth almost everything)...robert wyatt himself was essential player in scene as he hung around usa after softs/hendrix tour...got involved with carla bley..played with coryell etc...went back to uk inspired!

    same scene holdsworth emerged from...percy jones on bass as welll...none better..why they played with everybody!! hah

    cheers

  7. #56

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    Reading through this thread brought back some memories. It took a few tries for my Alexa to pull up WR’s Heavy Weather. I kept getting the weather report.

    RTF LAAF always struck me as a Latin band put together by the Scientologists to better “communicate” with audiences. Then Chick and Stan heard MO and quickly retooled. Frankly, I don’t find that the post-LAAF fusion RTF stands up (unlike, for example, MO, which is still as heavy as it gets, or Head Hunters, notwithstanding the awful synth solo on Chameleon). I winced a bit listening to Vulcan Worlds recently. And it was further downhill after that. My opinion, that’s all.

    Broadening the definition a little, I recall with fondness a Danny Kootch outing called The Section, as well as T Scott’s first LA Express albums with Robben Ford and Larry Carlton.

  8. #57

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    Some things I haven's seen mentioned in the thread
    Brecker Brothers -- Back to Back; Heavy Metal Bebop; Don't Stop the Music
    Hammer and Jerry Goodman -- Like Children
    Jeff Beck with the Jan Hammer Group - Live
    Little Feat -- Time Loves a Hero
    Sco - Still Warm

    John

  9. #58

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    I heard Beck and Hammer back in the day. Terrific concert. They traded licks, with Hammer taking Beck’s licks and in a blink of the eye varying them into something amazingly ornate and complex. Beck finally dropped his hands in mock surrender.

  10. #59

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bach5G
    Reading through this thread brought back some memories. It took a few tries for my Alexa to pull up WR’s Heavy Weather. I kept getting the weather report.

    RTF LAAF always struck me as a Latin band put together by the Scientologists to better “communicate” with audiences. Then Chick and Stan heard MO and quickly retooled. Frankly, I don’t find that the post-LAAF fusion RTF stands up (unlike, for example, MO, which is still as heavy as it gets, or Head Hunters, notwithstanding the awful synth solo on Chameleon). I winced a bit listening to Vulcan Worlds recently. And it was further downhill after that. My opinion, that’s all.

    Broadening the definition a little, I recall with fondness a Danny Kootch outing called The Section, as well as T Scott’s first LA Express albums with Robben Ford and Larry Carlton.
    I agree the first 2 are awesome but I have a soft spot for Romantic Warrior, as it was one of the first jazz records I ever bought, and I think it is still the pinnacle of Dimeola's career. (Though whether it's real "jazz" could be a point for debate.) Great, great production on that album.

    Who started this thread?!?

    Oh...

    Anyway, listening to the Grateful Dead's Without a Net today. Longtime deadheads may disagree, but I think this is their best recording on vinyl...pristine production, the vocals are not immaculate but "good enough", the rhythm section is tight as a cat's a$$, and the jams are high level. Also special marks for the boys' guitar tone. The versions of Birdsong and Eyes of the World in particular veer into jazz fusion territory...the latter features Branford Marsalis on sax.

  11. #60

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    Eyes of The World is a really fun set of changes to jam on.

  12. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff
    I agree the first 2 are awesome but I have a soft spot for Romantic Warrior, as it was one of the first jazz records I ever bought, and I think it is still the pinnacle of Dimeola's career. (Though whether it's real "jazz" could be a point for debate.) Great, great production on that album.

    Who started this thread?!?

    Oh...

    Anyway, listening to the Grateful Dead's Without a Net today. Longtime deadheads may disagree, but I think this is their best recording on vinyl...pristine production, the vocals are not immaculate but "good enough", the rhythm section is tight as a cat's a$$, and the jams are high level. Also special marks for the boys' guitar tone. The versions of Birdsong and Eyes of the World in particular veer into jazz fusion territory...the latter features Branford Marsalis on sax.
    Without a Net is great "Live" album (compiled from a few shows, I think)

    The sound quality is great, and yeah, that "Eyes" with Branford is killin.'



    I think my favorite fusion records are Herbie's "Sextant" and Badal Roy's "Daybreak,"with Kenny Wessel on guitar.

  13. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by Average Joe
    Tribal Tech needs more love in this thread. While it may be hard to single out just one album, I think their body of work stand among the best.
    Absolutely! They are my desert island band (anything with Scott). Sounds like someone put Jeff Beck, Jimi, SRV, Zeppelin, and Weather Report in a hadron collider.

  14. #63

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    Excellent thread to dig into your favs. To avoid obvious choices I recommend this:


  15. #64

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tomcat
    Excellent thread to dig into your favs. To avoid obvious choices I recommend this:

    This was one of the albums that got me into Jazz. I saw some of Lee's initial concerts at The Baked Potato in North Hollywood in 78 \ 79.

    One funny thing happened when I went to the restroom; There was graffiti on the wall and one thing was "Joe Pass pissed here".

    When I went in, Lee was just finishing, and after he was done, and turned around he said something like "I don't know if I'm qualified to piss here if Joe did!".

  16. #65

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    Most of you guys probably wouldn't think of it as "fusion," but I do -- Buckshot LeFonque

    John

  17. #66

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    for you jeff beck-jan hammer fans...a track-blue wind- from their hollywood bowl reunion from 2016



    cheers

  18. #67

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    doesn't get much better for an (original 70's) fusion quartet....stanley clarke, jan hammer, bill connors and tony williams



    cheers

    This plus Inner Mounting Flame got me through my 15th year of life. I'd love to hear them both again, though with the ears I had then.

  19. #68

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    Listening to a couple of cuts, I wonder if JH gets enough credit for his contribution to MO? And, I guess, by extension, to fusion history.
    Last edited by Bach5G; 12-12-2019 at 09:49 PM.

  20. #69

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    Yep - here's one you missed - a remarkable, unique record - one of my all time favourites - which I place on a pedestal level with 'Sergeant Pepper' for inventiveness and innovation - and which some might call proto-fusion (occasional background horns on a couple of tracks) or prog-rock:-

    The Soft Machine - Volume II - Probe Records - 1969

    They went on to be more decisively and sophisticatedly jazz-rock in subsequent years, but not as gripping - that 1969 year was one of amazing inventiveness and breakneck advances in their musical sophistication- from where they'd been to where they were going. Volumes 1 to 4 are essential listening - after that, well, the magic 'progressively' wore off.....

    See Youtube: Jazz Bilzen 1969 tienerklanken (11.00 through to 25.50)

    For a better sound on this same musical piece, hear their classic studio performance:

    'Moon In June' (long version) live at the BBC 1969 (also on YouTube)

    And the most razor-sharp, professionally together and blasting-it-out jazz rock gig I ever saw? Chick Corea's 'Return To Forever' (with Bill Connors) at the Guildford Civic Hall, U.K., 1973 (I think!)

    Buy the CD of Soft Machine Volume 2 - you'll be glad you did !

  21. #70

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bach5G
    Listening to a couple of cuts, I wonder if JH gets enough credit for his contribution to MO?
    jan hammer was amazing!!! when jeff beck saw the mo while he appreciated mclaughlins obviously advanced shredding skill..it was hammer who appealed to him most..why he hooked up with him!!! and gave him a lot of creative power on becks own "solo" lps!!

    hammer was also wicked good on the stanley clarke lp mentioned above..and on timeless..the first john abercrombie solo lp on ecm!!! cobhams spectrum with guitarist tommy bolin!

    his great use of the pitch control wheel on early synths to bend notes was particularly attractive to guitar players..beck has based his entire career on it!! via whammy..which he uses constantly!!!

    so yeah...agree, jan hammer was an early fusion treasure

    cheers

  22. #71

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    Quote Originally Posted by QsDuesBlues
    Yep - here's one you missed - a remarkable, unique record - one of my all time favourites - which I place on a pedestal level with 'Sergeant Pepper' for inventiveness and innovation - and which some might call proto-fusion (occasional background horns on a couple of tracks) or prog-rock:-

    The Soft Machine - Volume II - Probe Records - 1969

    They went on to be more decisively and sophisticatedly jazz-rock in subsequent years, but not as gripping - that 1969 year was one of amazing inventiveness and breakneck advances in their musical sophistication- from where they'd been to where they were going. Volumes 1 to 4 are essential listening - after that, well, the magic 'progressively' wore off.....

    See Youtube: Jazz Bilzen 1969 tienerklanken (11.00 through to 25.50)

    For a better sound on this same musical piece, hear their classic studio performance:

    'Moon In June' (long version) live at the BBC 1969 (also on YouTube)

    And the most razor-sharp, professionally together and blasting-it-out jazz rock gig I ever saw? Chick Corea's 'Return To Forever' (with Bill Connors) at the Guildford Civic Hall, U.K., 1973 (I think!)

    Buy the CD of Soft Machine Volume 2 - you'll be glad you did !
    love it..agree..and thanks for that..hugh hoppers (ayers replacement) fuzz bass introduction on vol II...yeah..but i'll stick with soft machine thru terry riley minimalist inspired 7...and even the holdsworthian bundles...they morphed and dipped but always remained innovative

    and wyatt still with us...despite it all..

    cheers

  23. #72

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    Hugh Hopper deserves greater recognition and name dropping. Great player, and really innovative.

  24. #73

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop
    Hugh Hopper deserves greater recognition and name dropping. Great player, and really innovative.
    Indeed; and he’s on two of the three cuts I posted above. I was lucky enough to catch him at The Knitting Factory back in the ’90s.

  25. #74

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    I must also shoutout to Jeff Sipe, Jonas Hellborg and Shawn Lane for the masterpiece, “Temporal Analogues of Paradise.”

  26. #75

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    Brecker Brothers - Heavy Metal BeBop



    Also, Weather Report's 3rd album Sweetnighter. I really dig pre Jaco WP.


  27. #76

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop
    Hugh Hopper deserves greater recognition and name dropping. Great player, and really innovative.


    Best fusion albums of all time-bilzen69_soft_machine-jpg


    Indeed, yes - first time I saw him he'd not long joined Soft Machine and was seated, playing a Precision bass - a knockout performance by the group at the Parliament Hill Fields Open Air Concert, Summer 1969 (I was on the ceiling for the next 3 days !). Saw him many times thereafter - a great musical soul.

    Peter Jenner and Andrew King (Blackhill Enterprises) also deserve everlasting praise if not an MBE each (if they're still with us) for organising/making possible the many unforgettable FREE open air concerts in the London parks during these years - with quite unbelievable line-ups on any one day - which introduced thousand upon thousand of punters like myself to Blackhill related label artists and to the best music of the day. The Nice, Yes, Procul Harum, Soft Machine, Roy Harper, Pink Floyd, Edgar Broughton Band, Tyrannosaurus Rex, Third Ear Band, Jethro Tull, Egg, Byzantium, Melanie, The Stones, Blind Faith, Marriott/Frampton, Leslie West, Jack Bruce Band, and loads more - all FOR FREE - it couldn't be, could it ? (well actually, yes!).

    Today you pay £75-00 and the audience are more interested in selfie-ing themselves celebrating - regardless of what may or may not be happening on stage...……..and Prince Charles is often there as well, as a 'bonus', Lord help us.....

  28. #77

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    Qs, just reading those band names brings back a lot of memories, though I never saw any of them live. But it was a big formative period for me in my teens, discovering great new music.

  29. #78

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    Love this tune from Soft Machine 4; still listen to it all the time:


  30. #79

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    Ooooh, “Teeth” is classic! Mike Ratledge wrote great stuff with Soft Machine.

  31. #80

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    Quote Originally Posted by jbernstein91
    Love this tune from Soft Machine 4; still listen to it all the time:
    saxist elto dean era..equally beautiful...dean used the saxello..a widemouthed soprano of sorts..unique..very rashaan roland kirk inspired!!! clever





    cheers

  32. #81

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop
    Qs, just reading those band names brings back a lot of memories, though I never saw any of them live. But it was a big formative period for me in my teens, discovering great new music.

    I'll echo the latter, and I'm veering away from the 'jazzguitar' umbrella here, but - if you're unfamiliar with the music of Sheffield's The Comsat Angels (1979 - 2003-ish), risk whatever it costs on E-Bay for a copy of their 1996 CD 'My Mind's Eye' - and then have the lasting pleasure of investigating their back (and forward) catalogue. My interests focused mainly on jazz from the early 70's onwards, as the rock-related image became seemingly more important than the sound produced - but discovering The Comsat Angels in 1979 made up for the dearth of quality in a lot of post 60's music for me.

    Try this for size - ideally through some quality headphones with the volume whacked up to '11' - YouTube: The Comsat Angels - 'Something's Got To Give' - one hell of a 'B' side, the musical depiction of a 'noir-movie' type stakeout: - is she cheating on you, and what if she is......? Tragically commercially unsuccessful, their musical output over a 20-odd year period - even with a 'radio-friendly' interlude - qualifies them as Britain's finest 'unknown' rock group with a brilliant oevre.......hope you enjoy!

  33. #82

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    Sorry, Qs, but that just sounded like U2 or Simple Minds to my ears, with some local colour. Not my thing. Let's get back to fusion

  34. #83

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    I remember Coryell telling me "they call me the "godfather of fusion". " I don't really like that". I think it was Dimeola who first coined that phrase. Maybe based on "Spaces" which had a pretty heavy cast for the time. Coryell was good friends with Hendrix, and jammed together sometimes, (Steve Paul's Scene) I think Larry just considered it all music.

  35. #84

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    Tom Scott & the LA Express - Tom Cat


  36. #85

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    Nostalgia notwithstanding, as a huge fusion fan, there's some awesome stuff coming out of London these days. Very much in the fusion vein, but new and fresh. Check out Yussef Dayes, Mansur Brown, Alpha Mist