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  1. #1

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    Why is Kenny Burrell so damn good?

    I can't stop listening to his work.

    What are your favorite CDx/recordings (besides Midnight Blue)?

    Best KB story?

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    I agree! Not only is KB the man, he's a real class act as well.

    I have 15 KB discs and I dig them all. I can't really pick a favorite but 'Introducing Kenny Burrell - The First Blue Note Sessions' definitely deserves a mention!
    Last edited by Jazzpunk; 03-16-2011 at 03:07 AM.

  4. #3

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    Blues:The Common Ground, Blues Bash w/ Jimmy Smith and A Generation Ago Today get a lot of play at my house.

  5. #4

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    How many albums has he done like leader, sideman or just for the comping ?
    I don't know the number, but it's very amazing !

    For me, he's the reference of the jazz-blues.

    excellent with Ike quebec (soul samba), Jimmy Smith(blue bash, organ grinder), Stanley Turrentine(Hustlin', Midnight Blue),...

    I enjoy listening the albums : 'Round Midnight, All day long/All night long.
    The title "All of You" from the eponymous album is fantastic.

  6. #5

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    More than any other guitarist, Kenny is the one who got me excited about playing jazz guitar. Not the most 'flashy' or technical player, but with a terrific character and groove to his playing.

    My personal favorite KB album: Blue Lights, vol. 1 & 2

  7. #6

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    When people ask me about my playing, I usually reply that I try to sit in that comfortable chair between Kenny Burrell and Grant Green.

    KB has technique, soul, groove, sound!! Yep, the lot, the full package.





    Yes I am a fan, was it that obvious?

  8. #7

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    Kenny Burrell has a very melodic style.

    He's great.

  9. #8

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    I like his work with Jimmy Smith, esp "Back At The Chicken Shack." "Midnight Blue" is classic, of course, but that's been mentioned. I had a "Best Of" at one point that I now miss.

  10. #9

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    I'll jump on this train, he is a fantastic musician!

  11. #10

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    He's polished, precise and tasteful. He can take a simple blues progression and really make it sing and swing.

  12. #11

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    One of the greats. Impeccable taste, swing and feel.

  13. #12

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    Just started listening to his work recently, and I fell in love! Such an elegant and unique player! He has quickly become one of my favorites.

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by nado64

    excellent with Ike quebec (soul samba).

    That's an excellent record, ain't it?


    I love Kenny's "All Day Long" and "All Night Long," with the Prestige All-Stars...

    I'm also wear out his record with JC, the live village vanguard trio record, and as a sideman on Stanley Turrentine's "Hustlin'" and Thad Jones' "New York/Detroit Connection (or is that Detroit/New York?)

  15. #14

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    My first jazz album..(yes vinyl) and I still play it weekly...

    Kenny Burrell..Midnight Blue...I was hooked....in 1966...in California

    time on the instrument..pierre

  16. #15

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    Fourmost with Jimmy Smith, Stanley Turrentine, & Grady Tate is a great one as are Kenny's live albums Midnight At The Village Vanguard and 12-15-78.

    Also:

    Lotus Blossom
    The Cats with Coltrane and Tommy Flanagan.
    'Round Midnight

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyin' Brian
    Fourmost with Jimmy Smith, Stanley Turrentine, & Grady Tate is a great one as are Kenny's live albums Midnight At The Village Vanguard and 12-15-78.

    Also:

    Lotus Blossom
    The Cats with Coltrane and Tommy Flanagan.
    'Round Midnight
    Just got "The Cats" on CD a few months ago. Have it on vinyl too. Great record. Picked "Minor Mishap" off of it, but still have to write down the head.

  18. #17

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    I've been transcribing a bunch of KB blues lately.....really great stuff!

  19. #18

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    Like an old friend's voice, one that you are always glad to hear. Warm, intelligent, hip, sometimes strong and sometimes soft. It is always there when you need it.

  20. #19

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    My first jazz guitar album (LP)..was "Midnight Blue"...bought in 1965...still play it once or twice a week..

    oh the sounds of the needle in the grooves...

    my major influence...

    time on the instrument...pierre

  21. #20

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    Kenny is one of my early influences. I like that he also plays on acoustic nylon and acoustic steel string guitars. A good example of this is the album "Moon and Sand". On one of the tracks he does a version of Blue Bossa with a bridge section. Never heard this on any other recordings of Blue Bossa and haven't seen any lead sheets that have it. Makes me wonder if maybe Kenny composed the bridge?
    Last edited by EddieLastra; 06-10-2012 at 05:18 AM.

  22. #21

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    Great sounding Blue Bossa. thanks for the link.

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by pierre richard
    My first jazz guitar album (LP)..was "Midnight Blue"...bought in 1965...still play it once or twice a week..

    oh the sounds of the needle in the grooves...

    my major influence...

    time on the instrument...pierre
    Pierre,
    'Midnight Blue' is my go to album for studying the different forms of the jazz blues. Some really cool tracks in there that are very 1960's, but it's the era I grew up in and that's where it's at for me musically
    BTW, glad to know that I'm not the only one that still enjoys spinning the old vinyls

  24. #23

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    Yeah, Midnight Blue!
    It's the kind of record you can put on if you need inspiration to work on your blues, or just for the sheer listening enjoyment.
    However, I've been listening to it the most in the autumn when it gets dark and rainy with some good whiskey to go with it. That's the therapeutic use of it.

    I'm one of these new kids who's arrogant enough to listen to it on Compact Disc. I haven't found it on vinyl yet, though I can believe listening to it to be quite profound!

    To me, Kenny is one of the jazz guitar greats.

  25. #24

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    Glad you guys agree that Kenny is where it's at. I was lucky enough to get to spend time with him off and on when he first started teaching at UCLA around 1980. My guitar hero, to be sure. I love other players as well, but I always come back to Kenny.

  26. #25

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    Does anyone happen to know whether Kenny always used a pick or if he ever used finger and/or thumb? I was listening to the nylon string stuff on Moon and Sand and thought it might be fingers.

  27. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by KB_Blues
    Great video, thanks!

    Does anyone happen to know whether Kenny always used a pick or if he ever used finger and/or thumb? I was listening to the nylon string stuff on Moon and Sand and thought it might be fingers.
    I always heard he was famous for circle picking. I think he often uses hybrid style to get a finger style type sound when he needs it. I'm not an authority, just what I've observed.

  28. #27

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    I too love "Midnight Blue." Such a great record. Had it on vynal, back in the day, but God only knows where that it wound up. His is my favorite version of "Gee, Baby, Ain't I Good To You."

  29. #28

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    One of my favorites too....Wavy Gravvy also...

    the herb ellis quote and advice should be adhered to by beginners as well as intermediates...

    get the song in your head...learn the lyrics...the words will deliver the mood of the song....yes?

    time on the instrument...pierre

  30. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by pierre richard
    get the song in your head...learn the lyrics...the words will deliver the mood of the song....yes?
    +1. I'm a writer, so I have reams of lyrics in my head. I used to fill notebooks with lyrics to my favorite songs. (I pre-date the PC by a wide step!) I learn some tunes more for the lyric than, um 'jazz-worthiness' of the song, such as Johnny Mercer's lyric to the Harry Warren tune called "On the Atchison, Topeka, and the Santa Fe." (It's a catchy tune, but not one I would learn for its own sake; I learned it so I could sing those lyrics!)

    I also like songs with silly / fun lyrics, like "Frim Fram Sauce" and Louis Jordan tunes such as "Is You Is, Or Is You Ain't My Baby."

  31. #30

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    Until I really looked at it closely, Kenny's acoustic guitar appears to be a steel string acoustic strung with nylon strings, a very unusual setup. I'm thinking maybe a standard size classical guitar with it's shorter and wider neck might have been a bit small for him to comfortably play, since he usually plays that large body Gibson Super 400.

  32. #31

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    From the close-ups it looks like he has quite a disciplined classical type of right hand technique - one finger per string. I sometimes play jazz on a nylon (I'm a big Charlie Byrd fan) but my fingers are all over the place!

    And I think you're right about the guitar - it certainly looks like a regular steel string. I just checked and nylon strings with a ball on the end do exist so that's almost certainly what's he done.

    Whatever it is, it sounds great!

  33. #32

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    Glad to see Kenny getting the love here.

  34. #33

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    been listening to blue lights for 2 days now. (both albums)

  35. #34

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    Blue Bash with Jimmy Smith!!

    DG

  36. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by daveg
    Blue Bash with Jimmy Smith!!

    DG
    Speaking of Kenny Burrell and Jimmy Smith, here's Russell Malone sharing some humbling lessons he learned from both masters.


  37. #36

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    Burrell studied classical guitar for a while when he was young. He was a huge influence on everybody, including Wes. A very classy and intelligent guy, and a great teacher, as well as the very model of a jazz guitarist. Essential listening.

  38. #37

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    Gotta say other than Midnight Blue, I gotta go with his work with Jimmy Smith. I love KB's playing! It's a great change of pace from Wes or Martino, and just sounds great. Oh yea and that record with Trane? Shoot.

  39. #38

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    Kenny Burrell is about it for me as far as mainstream jazz guitar goes; Each to their own, etc. but without any disrespect to Messrs. Montgomery or Martino, I would rather listen to KB than either of them.

    I can't argue with these quotes, albeit the sources for some of them are quite surprising: I would have thought that Benson would have gone with Wes and Metheny with Jim Hall....but Hendrix and Stevie Wonder - bit out of left field, maybe?

    Press Quotes:
    ”Burrell is the grand master of jazz guitar.” - Dizzy Gillespie
    “There is no finer guitarist than Kenny Burrell.” - George Benson
    “Kenny Burrell that's the sound I'm looking for.” - Jimi Hendrix
    “Kenny Burrell is a great musician and his music has helped to make me what I am today.” - Stevie Wonder “Kenny Burrell is one of my favorite guitarists.” - Pat Metheny

  40. #39

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    My Ship is one of my favourite tunes - check out this amazingly laid back Kenny Burrell version on flat top - wow how well does he know this tune?

    Last edited by Groyniad; 10-20-2019 at 01:36 PM.

  41. #40

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    The sound really sits in the fingers...

  42. #41

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    I really love this tune, my favorite version is Jacky Terrasson and Cassandra Wilson's version.

  43. #42

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    Many thanks for posting this, I am YouTubing since years but did not find this gem.

    ***

    So there is no need for L5 and any special amp/reverb/PU to get a vintage soul moving jazz sound, I am very happy with this experience, this saves me a lot of time, and also gives me the solution, The only thing I need, I must practice and listen, then practice and listen until the result sounds like this video
    Last edited by Gabor; 10-21-2019 at 11:54 AM.

  44. #43

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    interesting - the moments that you can hear its a flat-top acoustic guitar (not that often)

    his phrasing is really wonderful here - and so representative of his thing

    tiny little explosions of 16th notes ornamenting a melody and not taking away from a very gentle lyrical vibe

    and his solo is so free - quite tricky form this tune has

    but mark murphy gets the prize for me (so far) - this is serious jazz singing:


  45. #44

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    Very, very nice! And Kenny's not even playing a "jazz guitar".

  46. #45

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    I like Kenny's version and Kenny generally. I wish he'd included Weill's intro (from Lady in the Dark) like Gil did with Miles and many other renditions. I just feel it's part of the piece and regret its absence.

    Fine trio, cadenza, and sensitive treatment, though...