View Poll Results: Past or Present...which era are you living in?

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  • I dig 'old school' jazz!

    122 45.86%
  • I dig 'contemporary' jazz!

    23 8.65%
  • I dig both equally!

    121 45.49%
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Posts 101 to 123 of 123
  1. #101

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    My tastes in guitar music goes back about 400 years, so I guess my taste in jazz is new school regardless of the era. However, I find a lot of modern recordings exhausting. I love the guitar sounds from the older recordings; not as dynamic, but they had their place and their own space. I just don't want to hear digital reverb and compression anymore. Give me Django or Segovia overloading the front end and I'm happy.

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #102

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    If we all just sit at home listening old recordings of dead musicians, there's not much of a future for jazz!!...
    Quote Originally Posted by Encinitastubes View Post
    My tastes in guitar music goes back about 400 years, so I guess my taste in jazz is new school regardless of the era. However, I find a lot of modern recordings exhausting. I love the guitar sounds from the older recordings; not as dynamic, but they had their place and their own space. I just don't want to hear digital reverb and compression anymore. Give me Django or Segovia overloading the front end and I'm happy.

  4. #103

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    Quote Originally Posted by larry graves View Post
    If we all just sit at home listening old recordings of dead musicians, there's not much of a future for jazz!!...
    Of course, as Devil's Advocate, one could argue that the greats from the "Golden Era" could quite possibly sustain an ongoing interest for this art form longer than the current scene will.... Besides, plenty of life left in those old forms yet! Hard Bop and early Post Bop were just warming up before the Beatles killed it....

  5. #104

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    Quote Originally Posted by princeplanet View Post
    Of course, as Devil's Advocate, one could argue that the greats from the "Golden Era" could quite possibly sustain an ongoing interest for this art form longer than the current scene will.... Besides, plenty of life left in those old forms yet! Hard Bop and early Post Bop were just warming up before the Beatles killed it....
    What I meant was the future of jazz as a performing art as opposed to just appreciation societies like here!.....I was playing Be-Bop in the 60s, until the Mersey sound took over all the jazz clubs in Liverpool. Do golden ages ever return? As guitarists we can play more or less anything...I do just that!...But jazz is my game...L...

  6. #105

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    Quote Originally Posted by pierre richard View Post
    old school man old school...

    wes...pass...roberts...farlow...ellis...kessell... bikert...byrd...smith...van eps...

    time on the instrument man...pierre
    Amen! And, let's add Freddie Green, Grant Green, Jimmy Raney, and...of course...Jim Hall.

    Oh, and don't leave out George Barnes, Bucky Pizzarelli, Les Paul, Kenny Burrell, George Benson, and the Three Godfathers: Charlie Christian, Eddie Lang, and Django Reinhardt.

  7. #106

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    I listen to all kinds of stuff ancient to modern.

    The people I aspire to play like the most are kind of old school: Grant, Wes, Barney, Kenny, Joe.

  8. #107

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    The more I work at this, the more I realize that, for me, learning jazz guitar needs to start almost with the history of the music - Satin Doll, Summertime, Autumn Leaves etc. leads to WWII tunes leads to bebop leads to modal jazz leads to the contemporary "Berklee" players etc.

    Too much just to dive into the deep end!!
    Last edited by boatheelmusic; 06-12-2015 at 10:15 AM.

  9. #108

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    What about the future? I live in the distant future where you can download cheese, and the name of Kenny G has long passed into obscurity. It's a good place, come join me via use of the time chord (it's a maj7#5 with extra garlic.)

  10. #109

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    In the future, the Gibson Robot guitar will actually be a robot which plays the guitar for you. This will free everybody up to go and do something else instead.

  11. #110

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    There is something in there regarding the Keynesian dream of increased leisure time brought by improvements in technology and the reality of increased inequality and 'unemployment' in todays world - but I think that robot guitarists would be a direct threat to most players income in numerous ways.

    In my dream future of togas and crystal spires, we all play the Synthaxe anyway.

  12. #111

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    Big band, swing, and bebop, for me. My wife calls it her grandfather's music. I listen to everything, but prefer the earlier.
    Matt

    Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.
    ~Thomas Huxley

  13. #112

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    I listen to everything from Mozart to modern, but modern jazz like Rosenwinkel doesn't do anything for me. Joe Pass, Barney Kessel, Wes Montgomery, Grant Green, Freddie Green, Jimmy Ramey, Bucky Pizzarelli, Charlie Christian, Frank Vignola, Jimmy Smith, Jimmy Bruno, Monty Alexander, Oscar Peterson, Herb Ellis, George Benson, George Barnes, Count Basie, Lou Donaldson, Charles Earland, Dizzy Gillespie, Tommy Flanagan, Sonny Stitt, Plas Johnson, etc. Now those cats swing!

  14. #113

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    I'm a zeitgeist sort of guy.

  15. #114

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    Quote Originally Posted by Endorphins View Post
    I'm a zeitgeist sort of guy.
    The Zeitgeist in London seems to be to play the music exactly as it was played in 1948. I'm sure it's not entirely the case, but it does seem all the guys in their early 20's seem to be out of sympathy with the contemporary stuff... Things go in cycles.

    Me, I'm rather partial to a bit of odd time, an analog delay and a wooly hat worn indoors.
    Last edited by christianm77; 10-23-2015 at 10:27 AM.

  16. #115

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    Lol. A good question.

    I aspire to be in the Present and look to Jazz to help me expand my thinking ...

    Though I don't play Standards and also don't want the changes to fly by as fast as in some Jazz and don't want as many II-V-I's all over the place as some Jazz- I am interested .

    I will check out some of the Modern guys I hear about here.

  17. #116

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    Quote Originally Posted by fumblefingers View Post
    both:

    i was on the 3rd row.




    2 nights later i was on the 4th row, at UCLA.
    I think I like McLaughlin's playing more now than way in the past...although I think a cleaner tone might be cool.

  18. #117

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    Old school jazz yeah give me Lee Morgan, Clifford Brown, Art Pepper, Herbie (transcends all era's), Mobley, Turrentine, Miles etc etc.

    For me, not lots of old school guitar that I get into I can't feel it.
    Grant Green's first few records, early Benson, some Kenny Burrell but generally a lot of those amazing guitarists from back whenever I can appreciate but don't dig.

    When it comes to contemporary though the guitarists are killer, love them - Rotem Sivan, Gilad Hekselman, Jonathan Kreisberg, Szymon Mika and then the new horn players wow Hargrove, Redman, Fram, Avashai Cohen trumpet, Mark Turner and rhythm guys Petros Klampanis, Lindah Oh, McLean, Gilmore Stewart etc etc then piano oh my Aaron Parks Soren Bebe Eyel Lovett. Man jazz is amazing right now!
    “When you’re creating your own ...., man, even the sky ain’t the limit.”
    Miles Davis

  19. #118

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    Music went wrong in 1722. Everything was downhill after that.

  20. #119

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    Re: like Johnny Mac more now than in the past... Hmm? I don't know? I've always liked him. He sounds like Johnny Mac, to me. The clip above sounds not THAT dissimilar to Mahavishnu Orchestra stuff from 1973-ish, to me. The chief difference is that I'm listening to JM riff on a Super Strat, not a Gibson. Otherwise, it's Johnny Mac. (Pretty good, too.)

    As it happens, though, I'm kind of stuck in the Charlie Christian-to-Larry Coryell era--from the Benny Goodman Sextet to the Gary Burton Quartet (right at the dawn of fusion). Interestingly, that's the era from the Gibson ES-150 to the Gibson Super-400 (Christian to Coryell).

    Now, just mix in some West Coast hot shot guitar (Jimmy Bryant, etc.) and I'm a happy camper.

  21. #120

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    I am old but am using very modern type Voicings , Rhythms , Techniques etc . for mostly mainstream ( not esoteric ) Guitar which sometimes resembles Jazz but is not ....or Classical but is not.

    I think because I was exposed to Jazz late in life - I use it as part of my Style rather than became absorbed into Jazz and 'changing course ' or overall direction.

    When younger -I wanted to have the chops or vibrato of this guy or that guy , or the fire of the Fusion Players ,or the contrapuntal ability of Classical Guitarists- but I have a lot of that now so am not trying to sound like _____ unless it gets into my head somehow.

    Also when writing/composing- sometimes it's much better to not listen to ' Others ' for awhile....

    I have seen others surprised that many people on the Forum don't like /love Jazz - I like some of it but the spirit of Jazz - I like that and the skill set- I like that I use that.

    In the 80s in Miami we had semi famous Jazzers sometimes playing R&B - or maybe improvising on a Sade Tune or Al Jarreau Tune that morphed into an expanded form of R&B - they often did not realize it !
    That is some of the basis for what I do now- I have only had the strong chops needed to do it for a few years - I could have made real money if I had my present chops(not just speed but intervals &rhythmic figures) in the 80s lol.

    I am old but clearly ' new school '-
    Last edited by Robertkoa; Today at 09:07 AM.

  22. #121

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    While I selected "old school" instead of "both", what I listen to the most would be non "old school" players playing "old school" music \ songs.

    E.g. the generation associated with players like Doug Raney; In some way the recordings by artist from this generation have the best of both worlds.

    (which is also the case when a contemporary artist does an "old school" type recordings (say mostly standards).

  23. #122

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    Quote Originally Posted by docbop View Post
    Jazz is about learning from the past, but playing on the cutting edge. So I dig both old and new.
    Well said doc. As an example, I like Jim Hall and Miles Davis. Some might consider them old school, but they were always striving to extend their playing and composing, right to the end.

    As the expression says, I like music "In the tradition" A solid base never hurt!

    Doug

  24. #123

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    I actually don't like jazz music or guitars TBH - I'm just a slut for interesting forums irrespective of the subject matter !!!!!!!!

    Will