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  1. #1

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    I've been checking out Mike Moreno's music. I found him as Aaron Parks's guitarist on the Invisible Cinema CD. He has two albums as a leader; both very nice. He handles an acoustic well too.

    He is considered "post-Rosenwinkel" in his style. Check him out if you have not already.

    This is a neat live song:


    Also with Aaron Parks:


    I'm curious what you all think. Though I like it, and it does not sound too "outside", I find his playing somewhat ambiguous. It seems abstract on many levels.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    I like Mike's playing and compositions a lot.

  4. #3

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    lol post-rosenwinkel.

    Sorry Rosenwinkel is excellent and probably the top of the charts for modern jazz guitarists that is not 40ish and under... but post-rosenwinkel is a silly thing to say.

    Moreno might have elements of his sound... anyone these days that uses delay reverb and plays with a dark sound gets pigeonholed as a Rosenwinkel clone.

    I prefer Moreno to Rosenwinkel. Mostly in his use of space. But that is totally subjective.

    He's burning

    PS i really dig his drummer
    Last edited by Jake Hanlon; 12-19-2010 at 02:25 PM.

  5. #4

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    Here's Rosenwinkel playing Nemesis with Aaron Parks for comparison. I know it's a Mike Moreno thread, I don't mean to hijack it. Moreno's awesome, he deserves all the exposure he can get.

  6. #5

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    Aaron says he wrote it for Kurt. Mike is on the official recording though. Very neat tune in 7. Parks posted the chart for free download online. It is fun to play around with.

  7. #6

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    I first heard Moreno playing on a John Ellis CD. What a great surprise. You can't say there's no Rosenwinkel influence in his voice, but he's got something of his own going on, that's for sure.

  8. #7

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    Great clips! I was just listening to 'Invisible Cinema' this morning. Goes great with the rainy weather we're having!

  9. #8

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    Anyone care to analyze any aspects of his playing? Even subjective ideas would be interesting. I want to know more about this style!

    I heard an hour-long interview with him. He says he thinks of Wayne Shorter each time he composes (Nefertiti was mentioned). He is a listener of Radiohead and Blonde Redhead, two of my personal favorite post-rock bands, and good old Joni Mitchell. The impressionist composer/arranger Ravel is his favorite classical; I am also a big Ravel/Debussy fanatic. He sounded like a neat dude.

    Mike and I have uncannily common interests in music listening/influence, but we sound NOTHING like one another! In fact, I wouldn't guess that he dug that stuff any more than the next guy just by listening to him. Mind you, Mike is is a lifetime ahead of me guitar technique-wise though we are about the same age. He can shred! lol. I'm very old-schooled when it comes to my guitar style, not post-modern or "post-Rosenwinkel" whatever that means.

    Reviews always seem to call his playing "lyrical". That word bugs me when 95% of a solo does not seem "singable" due to extensive range, endless systems, and odd interval emphasis. I think it is very "intelligent" sounding, but I think of guys like Wes as "lyrical". (BTW Andrew Hill gets called lyrical as a piano soloist as well: he sounds like Hindemith improvising bi-tonal jazz in the cracks of rhythm! Not especially "lyrical"! Though it is great.)

    Thoughts?

  10. #9

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    Funny Mike Moreno Anecdote: I was seeing him perform at Chris' Jazz Cafe in Philadelphia, in his usual trio format (though maybe it was a quartet?). About ten minutes before he went on I decided to use the bathroom, and if anyone has ever been to Chris' you know that the bathrooms are small. The door opens to the sink, which is right next to the urinal, so when one opens the door and steps in they are inches away from anyone relieving themselves at said urinal. Anyways, I'm mid-pee, and who other than Mr. Mike Moreno opens the door, almost bonking me in the face with the headstock of his black 335. Though I hadn't yet finished, I quickly zipped up my pants in deference and offered Mike the urinal. He only sort of mumbled at me, grabbed some paper towels, and, blowing hard into them with his nose, threw them away and quickly returned to the stage (which is only about 5 feet away...).

    I know what your thinking, and yes, of course, as soon as the door shut I grabbed up his used paper towels and hid them safely in my pocket, to wipe my guitar down with upon my return home.

    Joking aside, Mike is an awesome player. I've seen him live twice, definitely something you want to do. My guitar teacher is a disciple of Mike's, following him to the ends of the Earth. He played a tune from Mike's CD Between the Lines (which I highly recommended), "Still Here" at his senior recital. "Between the Lines" is exceptional and definitely worth a listen.

    I love Mike's playing. Listening to Gypsy Jazz almost exclusively, I think this says a lot. He has incredible right hand technique, and a technical precision in his timing and overall playing that seems almost robotic. He has the ability to play licks in the midst of very long and fast lines that make you stand up out of your seat. Jake commented on Mike's use of space in improvisation, which is something I think Mike uses extensively and to great effect. Additionally, I think Mike's beautiful new Marchione, seen in the 1st video posted in this thread, has contributed to his playing.

  11. #10

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    Great story! lol.

  12. #11

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    I actually grew up around him. Him and I weren't friends, (he was a few years older than me) but he knew everone I knew that went to HSPVA when I lived in Houston. I remember he had a cocaine problem in New York and he moved back to Houston. Our mutual friend said his playing had become worse, ut that was 11 years ago. I am happy as hell to see Mike doing so well!

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark P
    Great new vid of mike:
    Those Marchione semi hollow's sound great!

  14. #13

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    As much as he is a fantastic technician, along with his unbelievable command of the instrument, I feel his playing (along with Rosenwinkle's for that matter) lacks one key aspect.... joy.
    Last edited by sgreb; 01-03-2011 at 05:38 PM.

  15. #14

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    Wow. Chops city! I still have to admit that I really don't get it. Perhaps no joy. Not sure. I am intrigued.

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgreb
    As much as he is a fantastic technician, along with his unbelievable command of the instrument, I feel his playing (along with Rosenwinkle's for that matter) lacks one key aspect.... joy.
    I guess that's fair; even as a listener intense concentration is required to fully appreciate Mike's music. You can see that even more concentration is required to play Mike's music, he never relaxs! (though I don't think that's really true, he's probably always making that face...)

    I can see where you're coming from. I definitely have to be in a certain mood for Mike Moreno, whereas I can almost always listen to Django (very happy music!). His playing might lack "joy", but I believe the majority of his compositions and solo work therein are very very remarkable.
    Last edited by Mark P; 01-03-2011 at 08:21 PM.

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark P
    His playing might lack "joy", but I believe the majority of his compositions and solo work therein are very very remarkable.
    I agree his work is remarkable, (and I could never get close to playing with that kind of dexterity) but I find it hard to listen to him for very long... I kind of get bummed out. Other current "complex" players (like Metheny's trio work, Julian Lage, Peter Berstein or even Matt Stevens for that matter) still transmit, melody, groove, blues and fun, while simultaneously exemplifying a pure state of intellegent and jaw-dropping playing.

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgreb
    I agree his work is remarkable, (and I could never get close to playing with that kind of dexterity) but I find it hard to listen to him for very long... I kind of get bummed out. Other current "complex" players (like Metheny's trio work, Julian Lage, Peter Berstein or even Matt Stevens for that matter) still transmit, melody, groove, blues and fun, while simultaneously exemplifying a pure state of intellegent and jaw-dropping playing.
    ^^Don't forget Gilad Hekselman!!

    I know what you're saying, and it can get sort of unsettling listening to some of his darker, heavier tunes for extended periods of time.

  19. #18

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    sorry im a bit late on this thread!

    love his playing. i own quite a few of his albums or albums he's been on and love them all. I had a skype lesson with him a few months ago. Absolutely MEGA!

  20. #19

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    I just talked to a mutual friend of ours (Mike Moreno and mine) and apparently some of the same people coming up in our era in the Houston area we lived in that went on to Berklee and Peabody ect are turning to pop fusion.

    Are people afraid of straight-ahead/modern jazz? Is this common?
    Here's what I'm talking about, Alan Hampton was another tremendous player (bassist) now he's playing on pop records?
    http://alanhampton.com/listen
    /////// JOSH MEASE\\\\\\\ ::

    It's so great to see Mike stick to his gun and not be afraid. N offense to the others that play "poppish" music

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bailz
    sorry im a bit late on this thread!

    love his playing. i own quite a few of his albums or albums he's been on and love them all. I had a skype lesson with him a few months ago. Absolutely MEGA!

    I thought about doing that. Wanna spill his price?

  22. #21

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    This is some great stuff:


    Nelson Veras!!

  23. #22

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    I find a lot of joy in Mike's playing! My definition of 'joy' encompasses a wide range of emotional colors though.

  24. #23

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    think it was £80 for an hour a half or something like that.

  25. #24

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    I have two CD with him, "Third Wish" and a tribute to Pink Floyd "jazz side of the moon" with sam yahel.

    Moreno is like Debussy or Bill Evans.
    His improvisations are more vague, more in the suggestion.
    And, Rosenwinkel is like Bach or Sonny Rollins.
    He has a style more affirmed.

  26. #25

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    I like that John Ellis track. I gotta get that album! Is Mike on all of it? Badass.