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  1. #26

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    Reviving an old thread. What do people think of this guy? His playing is some of the freshest jazz guitar I have heard in recent memory.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #27

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    His home streaming is fastly becoming one hip venue of the current NYC jazz scene! So many great concerts.

  4. #28

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    I am not familiar with these younger, astonishingly capable guitarists (most of them mentioned in the earlier messages in this thread), and I can hear from the sound they are producing that they all (almost) have some common picking, articulation mannerisms that are very different from the previous generations. [I watched B. Kassel, Joe Pass, Luis Stewart, et al from a few yards away night after night. A totally different approach to tone, articulation and right hand technique. Also, all my early teachers advocated that kind of set up and right hand approach.]
    Where does this new sound originate? Berklee? They even all prefer the same kind of lovely, woody, thin body archtops (also some Tele interest), and very minimal wrist attack, rich, hot sounding humbuckers seem to add to the particular tone they variously produce (maybe a little bit of Ed Bickert in some of their sound, but certainly no Tal Farlow!)
    Clearly, lighter strings, but not necessarily lighter picks. Low action setups?
    Could anyone with any information confirm, or add to this topic. I am very curious.

    To add: they are also very different in tone production from the 1970s jazz-rock virtuosi, such as Allan Holdsworth, Gary Boyle, … (both of them, back then used extremely light stings and action - I still have the little note book with their scribblings of the string gauge range they wrote down for me during post gig drinks: AH used .09 Picatos in 1973!)

  5. #29

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    In my opinion the tone and style of many contemporary players can be traced back to Jim Hall (legato phrasing with light strings, ambient & dark reverb while still retaining the acoustic properties of the instrument). He influenced Sco/Frisell/Metheny, who influenced Kurt, who influenced Moreno, and on it goes

    I would argue with Metheny that Jim was the first new guy (watch the recent interview with Rick Beato to catch that reference)!
    Last edited by ikusan; 09-02-2021 at 06:45 AM.

  6. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by SeanSeb
    I am not familiar with these younger, astonishingly capable guitarists (most of them mentioned in the earlier messages in this thread), and I can hear from the sound they are producing that they all (almost) have some common picking, articulation mannerisms that are very different from the previous generations. [I watched B. Kassel, Joe Pass, Luis Stewart, et al from a few yards away night after night. A totally different approach to tone, articulation and right hand technique. Also, all my early teachers advocated that kind of set up and right hand approach.]
    Where does this new sound originate? Berklee? They even all prefer the same kind of lovely, woody, thin body archtops (also some Tele interest), and very minimal wrist attack, rich, hot sounding humbuckers seem to add to the particular tone they variously produce (maybe a little bit of Ed Bickert in some of their sound, but certainly no Tal Farlow!)
    Clearly, lighter strings, but not necessarily lighter picks. Low action setups?
    Could anyone with any information confirm, or add to this topic. I am very curious.

    To add: they are also very different in tone production from the 1970s jazz-rock virtuosi, such as Allan Holdsworth, Gary Boyle, … (both of them, back then used extremely light stings and action - I still have the little note book with their scribblings of the string gauge range they wrote down for me during post gig drinks: AH used .09 Picatos in 1973!)
    Id add that there’s a lot left hand articulation in the mix.

    Its not like they are using rock strings either; Gilad Hekselman uses .13s (TI’s I think). But roundwounds strings are ubiquitous.

    Current gen more likely to start on electric?

    Probably it comes from Kurt Rosemwinkels influence. But that said, I think the ur example of this type of tone and articulation is specifically early Metheny, Bright Size Life, building of course on Jim Hall.

  7. #31

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    I wonder if the video you sent is functioning.
    Or has it been withdrawn-?
    Best wishes,
    S.

  8. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by SeanSeb
    I wonder if the video you sent is functioning.
    Or has it been withdrawn-?
    Best wishes,
    S.
    It's now been set to private by the host.

  9. #33

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    Thank you.
    s.

  10. #34

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    I listen to him quite a lot. Especialle First in Mind.